Gift of Death

Gift of Death

by Jacques Derrida
     
 

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The Gift of Death is Jacques Derrida's most sustained consideration of religion to date. While continuing to explore questions introduced in Given Time such as the possibility, or impossibility, of giving and the economic and anthropological nature of gifts, Derrida turns to the notion of responsibility and the ultimate gifts of life and

Overview

The Gift of Death is Jacques Derrida's most sustained consideration of religion to date. While continuing to explore questions introduced in Given Time such as the possibility, or impossibility, of giving and the economic and anthropological nature of gifts, Derrida turns to the notion of responsibility and the ultimate gifts of life and death.

Derrida divides the book into four parts, which deal respectively with the development of the notion of responsibility in the Platonic and Christian traditions; the relation between sacrifice and mortality; the contemporary meaning of the story of Abraham and Isaac; and the relation between religious ideology and economic rationality, explicitly linking this book with Given Time. The texts under discussion include the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, as well as writings from Patocka, Heidegger, Levinas, and Kierkegaard (whom he addresses here for the first time in print.)

Derrida's main concern is with the meaning of moral and ethical responsibility in Western religion and philosophy. He questions the limits of the rational and the responsible that one reaches in granting or accepting death, whether by sacrifice, murder, execution, or suicide. Beginning with a discussion of Patocka's Heretical Essays on the History of Philosophy, Derrida develops Patocka's ideas concerning the sacred and responsibility through comparisons with the works of Heidegger, Levinas, and, finally, Kierkegaard. Derrida's treatment of Kierkegaard makes clear that the two philosophers share some of the same concerns. He then undertakes a careful reading of Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling, comparing and contrasting his own conception of responsibility with that of Kierkegaard, and extending and deepening his recent accounts of the gift and sacrifice. For Derrida, the very possibility of sacrifice, especially the ultimate sacrifice of one's own life for the sake of another, comes into question.

This work resonates with much of Derrida's earlier writing and will be of interest to scholars in anthropology, philosophy, and, of course, literary criticism. In addition, given the emphasis on the work of Kierkegaard and on the role of religion in our thinking, it will be of particular interest to a new readership among scholars of ethics and religion.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Comprises four sections which deal respectively with the development of the notion of responsibility in the Platonic and Christian traditions; the relation between sacrifice and mortality; the contemporary meaning of the story of Abraham and Isaac; and the relation between religious ideology and economic rationality. Originally published in 1992 as Donner la Mort in L'ethique du Don, Jacques Derrida et la Pensee du Don by Metailie-Transition, Paris. Lacks an index and a bibliography. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780226143064
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Publication date:
06/28/1996
Series:
Religion and Postmodernism Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
115
Product dimensions:
5.52(w) x 8.44(h) x 0.39(d)

Meet the Author


Jacques Derrida (1930–2004) was director of studies at the école des hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris, and professor of humanities at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of many books published by the University of Chicago Press.

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