Gift of the Unmage (Worldweavers Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Great things have been expected of Thea, the seventh child of two
seventh children, Now, with Cheveyo, a mage [of the Anasazi], Thea has
begun to weave herself a new magical identity, infused with elements
of the original worlds. But back home, THea keeps her abilities ...
See more details below
Gift of the Unmage (Worldweavers Series #1)

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Overview

Great things have been expected of Thea, the seventh child of two
seventh children, Now, with Cheveyo, a mage [of the Anasazi], Thea has
begun to weave herself a new magical identity, infused with elements
of the original worlds. But back home, THea keeps her abilities hidden
and attends the Wandless Academy, the one school on Earth for those
who have no apparent magical talent. It is there that Thea realizes
that her enemies are hungrier and more dangerous than she knew. What's
more, her greatest strength may be the powerlessness she has resisted
for so long.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016615882
  • Publisher: Sky Warrior Books
  • Publication date: 5/16/2013
  • Series: Worldweavers Series , #1
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 865,071
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

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(1)

4 Star

(3)

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(2)

2 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 30, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Jocelyn Pearce for TeensReadToo.com

    Thea is a double seventh--a seventh child of two seventh children--and so, as soon as she is born, great things are expected of her. Everyone waits anxiously for her sure-to-be powerful magic to reveal itself. <BR/><BR/>And waits. And waits. <BR/><BR/>She disappoints everyone with her lack of the magic almost everyone in her world has, even those who can't show it, like her parents. However, in a last-ditch attempt to find Thea's power, her father sends her to another world, where her teacher, Chevyo, helps her to discover her own abilities. <BR/><BR/>Back home, however, Thea attends the Wandless Academy, where those hopeless cases are sent to be isolated from magic. There, her strange powers that Chevyo helped her find in the other world come in surprisingly handy when she and a few friends, thought to be talentless and useless by much of their society, are called upon to save their world. <BR/><BR/>GIFT OF THE UNMAGE was a good book, really, but at times I felt like it had a lot of potential to be even better, so I was a little disappointed. It's still worth the read for those who are looking for this sort of fantasy, however, and I will be looking forward to Ms. Alexander's next books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A YA read with great use of American Indian mythology.

    Thea is 14 years old. She's the seventh child of two seventh children, which means she is to be very powerful. Thea wants to go to the best magical University when she gets older. But, there is one thing holding her back...she doesn't have the magical touch, at all. She's not able to perform any magical projects. She feels she's letting her parents down. They have tried everything they can to help Thea find her magical nitch. Now, there is only one thing left to try and her father will call in a huge favor to try it.

    In her eavesdropping Thea knows her parents have plans for her and if these plans with some private lessons don't work, she will be sent to that place next year. That place is The Wandless Academy, where non-magical children go to school. Non-magical children and schools are the minority and she feels she will become nothing in a magical world without magical powers.

    This is a world where magic exists in a big way, and in many different specialities and levels. If you don't have magic, you don't amount to much of anything here, or as Thea feels. There is a big world starting to be created here with endless magical possibilities; from our traditional telepathy between family members to traditional magic with music or shepherd mages and different levels of mages. We even have portals to travel to different places and through time.

    This young adult read is not one for lots of violence or intimacy of boyfriend/girlfriend, but what I did enjoy from it was the American Indian mythology usage. This was a great mythology to set with this world. Alma relates the things Thea learns my using the beliefs to the current time and place Thea lives in.

    Thea starts off as a typical teenage child who in a way feels sorry for herself and guilty for her lack of powers, in relation to her parents. She has a wonderful and open relationship with her Aunt. As she is close with her parents, it's just she feels she has let them down, being expected to be so powerful. Thea really grows greatly through this book with what she learns while with Chevery. Then how she uses it when she returns home to willingly go to the Wardless Academy. Thea makes some wonderful and unusual friends there at the school. But it is a time she will never forget, for the things she accomplishes. I enjoyed the journeys Thea takes to understand herself. Through the beliefs and teachings Thea goes through she learns she has to be patient and the understanding will come ~ a great lesson to be learned by both children and adults alike.

    I enjoyed this first book, and will be reading the next book as well. I would suggest this book to a Young adult who likes to read of magic and Americal Indian mythology. I feel this book was a nice break from lots of fighting and violence and even the drooling love scenes. This is a nice read for a younger adult to sit back and enjoy, and the parents not worring what is in those pages.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2007

    Courtesy of Teens Read Too

    Thea is a double seventh--a seventh child of two seventh children--and so, as soon as she is born, great things are expected of her. Everyone waits anxiously for her sure-to-be powerful magic to reveal itself. And waits. And waits. She disappoints everyone with her lack of the magic almost everyone in her world has, even those who can't show it, like her parents. However, in a last-ditch attempt to find Thea's power, her father sends her to another world, where her teacher, Chevyo, helps her to discover her own abilities. Back home, however, Thea attends the Wandless Academy, where those hopeless cases are sent to be isolated from magic. There, her strange powers that Chevyo helped her find in the other world come in surprisingly handy when she and a few friends, thought to be talentless and useless by much of their society, are called upon to save their world. GIFT OF THE UNMAGE was a good book, really, but at times I felt like it had a lot of potential to be even better, so I was a little disappointed. It's still worth the read for those who are looking for this sort of fantasy, however, and I will be looking forward to Ms. Alexander's next books. **Reviewed by: Jocelyn Pearce

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2007

    there won't ever be one single thing that replaces Harry Potter once it's done...

    ...there will be many - and this is a book that deserves to be considered for a leading position in the posse. It's the anti-Harry Potter in a way, not the Boy Who Lived but the Girl Who Couldn't - a story of American magic and myth as much as Harry Potter was the embodiment of the British variety. Native American gods and spirits (including the Trickster himself, Coyote)jostle for space with a race of Elves with the souls of Ferengi and a bunch of misfit kids from the Last Ditch School for the Incurably Incompetent. As an opening salvo in a new trilogy, it stretches into the past and the future, leaving the reader to look forward to questions which will become resolved only in future volumes. A perfect summer read - something to while away the days until the last Potter, and then to leave the reader with something to look forward to once the Potter saga is done.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted May 14, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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