The Gifts of the Jews: How a Tribe of Desert Nomads Changed the Way Everyone Thinks and Feels [NOOK Book]

Overview

The author of the runaway bestseller How the Irish Saved Civilization has done it again. In The Gifts of the Jews Thomas Cahill takes us on another enchanting journey into history, once again recreating a time when the actions of a small band of people had repercussions that are still felt today.



The Gifts of the Jews reveals the critical change that made western ...
See more details below
The Gifts of the Jews: How a Tribe of Desert Nomads Changed the Way Everyone Thinks and Feels

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.99
BN.com price

Overview

The author of the runaway bestseller How the Irish Saved Civilization has done it again. In The Gifts of the Jews Thomas Cahill takes us on another enchanting journey into history, once again recreating a time when the actions of a small band of people had repercussions that are still felt today.



The Gifts of the Jews reveals the critical change that made western civilization possible. Within the matrix of ancient religions and philosophies, life was seen as part of an endless cycle of birth and death; time was like a wheel, spinning ceaselessly. Yet somehow, the ancient Jews began to see time differently. For them, time had a beginning and an end; it was a narrative, whose triumphant conclusion would come in the future. From this insight came a new conception of men and women as individuals with unique destinies--a conception that would inform the Declaration of Independence--and our hopeful belief in progress and the sense that tomorrow can be better than today. As Thomas Cahill narrates this momentous shift, he also explains the real significance of such Biblical figures as Abraham and Sarah, Moses and the Pharaoh, Joshua, Isaiah, and Jeremiah.



Full of compelling stories, insights and humor, The Gifts of the Jews is an irresistible exploration of history as fascinating and fun as How the Irish Saved Civilization.

BONUS MATERIAL: This ebook edition includes an excerpt from Thomas Cahill's Heretics and Heroes.

The Gifts of the Jews is the latest exploration of the historical foundations of Western civilization from Thomas Cahill, author of the bestselling How The Irish Saved Civilization. Cahill's premise is simple but bold: to show how the religious, moral, philosophical, and political systems developed by the Jews -- descendants and followers of Abraham, Moses, Joshua, Saul, and David --profoundly shaped the world we know today.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Prager
. . .[W]ritten with humor, whimsy, and an engaging sensitivity to literary nuance. But. . .aims for more than entertainment. . . .what is desperately needed is an articulation of Jewish distinctiveness. . . .Cahill. . .misleads those who may be truly seeking to understand where the Jews come from and how, as Jews, they can best carry their traditions forward into the future.
Commentary
Chicago Tribune
He exalts his ancient subject; their hearts, minds and experienes resonate in hsi compelling contemporary narrative.
Sarah Horowitz
Thomas Cahill looks at history with the rigor of a scholar but explains it simplywith the skill of a gifted teacher. . .He conveys with a fresh lens a legacy 'so much a part of us' that we scarcely recognize it. —The Jewish Bulletin
Diane Zaga
Thomas Cahill places the spiritual journey of biblical-era Jewry firmly in a historical context while simultaneously making it come alive in a way that is almost sensory in its immediacy. —Jewish Journal
Library Journal
Cahill argues that the greatest gifts of the Jews are the linear theory of history (vs. the cyclical theory of other ancients), with its implication that life can get better and avoid decline and the idea of the equality and dignity of each individual that culminated in the declaration that "All men are created equal." Other gifts include the concepts of universal brotherhood, peace, and justice. (LJ 3/15/97) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
New York Times Book Review
Charming and poetic... an entirely engaging, delectable voyage into the distant past. . .a small treasure.
Sarah Horowitz
Thomas Cahill looks at history with the rigor of a scholar but explains it simply, with the skill of a gifted teacher. . .He conveys with a fresh lens a legacy 'so much a part of us' that we scarcely recognize it. -- The Jewish Bulletin
Diane Zaga
Thomas Cahill places the spiritual journey of biblical-era Jewry firmly in a historical context while simultaneously making it come alive in a way that is almost sensory in its immediacy. -- Jewish Journal
The New York Times
Charming and poetic... an entirely engaging, delectable voyage into the distant past. . .a small treasure.
Los Angeles Times
A lovely tale. . .graceful and instructive.
Prager
. . .[W]ritten with humor, whimsy, and an engaging sensitivity to literary nuance. But. . .aims for more than entertainment. . . .what is desperately needed is an articulation of Jewish distinctiveness. . . .Cahill. . .misleads those who may be truly seeking to understand where the Jews come from and how, as Jews, they can best carry their traditions forward into the future. -- Commentary
Kirkus Reviews
Shows how the ancient Israelites transformed the idea of religion by gradually introducing monotheism, and equally transformed our sense of time and history. Beginning with Abraham's departure from his Sumerian homeland, the ancient Hebrews broke with the repetitive cyclical image of history assumed by most ancient religions to forge what Cahill terms the 'processive' world view.

In this perspective, the present and future become more important than the past, for they are open to change, progress, and hope. Cahill also credits the Hebrew bible with bequeathing to Western civilization such seminal ideas as the interior self (e.g. in David's Psalms), the universal commonalities of all peoples, and, more dubiously, a focus on interpersonal relationships (e.g. in the 'Song of Songs').

He manages to turn many a beautiful phrase while being forthrightly colloquial. Occasionally, however, he overdoes the plain talk, missing more profound dynamics, as in noting that he's willing to give God 'the benefit of the doubt' for commanding Abraham to sacrifice Isaac because 'He had to jump-start this new religion and he didn't always have the best material to work with.' But he occasionally overstates his case—surely the ancient Greeks were as significant an influence on our values and worldview as the ancient Israelites. Nonetheless, in an age crowded with bloated, pedantic tomes, Cahill offers a refreshingly succinct, illuminating, and readable summary of the Hebrew bible's enduring wisdom and influence.

From the Publisher
"Captivating...Mr.Cahill's book is a gift."
N.Y. Times

"This is a valuable book, of interest to everyone, religious or not."
Washington Times

"A highly readable, entrancing journey."
San Francisco Chronicle

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307755117
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 4/28/2010
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 103,373
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Thomas Cahill studied at New York's Union Theological Seminary, Columbia University, Fordham University, and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America with some of the nation's most distinguished literary and biblical scholars.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

The Jews started it all--and by "it" I mean so many of the things we care about, the underlying values that make all of us, Jew and gentile, believer and atheist, tick. Without the Jews, we would see the world through different eyes, hear with different ears, even feel with different feelings. And not only would our sensorium, the screen through which we receive the world, be different: we would think with a different mind, interpret all our experience differently, draw different conclusions from the things that befall us. And we would set a different course for our lives.

By "we" I mean the usual "we" of late-twentieth century writing: the people of the Western world, whose peculiar but vital mentality has come to infect every culture on earth, so that, in a startlingly precise sense, all humanity is now willy-nilly caught up in this "we." For better or worse, the role of the West in humanity's history is singular. Because of this, the role of the Jews, the inventors of Western culture, is also singular: there is simply no one else remotely like them; theirs is a unique vocation. Indeed, as we shall see, the very idea of vocation, of a personal destiny, is a Jewish idea.

Our history is replete with examples of those who have refused to see what the Jews are really about, who--through intellectual blindness, racial chauvinism, xenophobia, or just plain evil--have been unable to give this oddball tribe, this raggle-taggle band, this race of wanderers who are the progenitors of the Western world, their due. Indeed, at the end of this bloodiest of centuries, we can all too easily look back on scenes of unthinkable horror perpetrated by those who would do anything rather than give the Jews their due.

But I must ask my readers to erase from their minds not only the horrors of history--modern, medieval, and ancient--but (so far as one can) the very notion of history itself. More especially, we must erase from our minds all the suppositions on which our world is built--the whole intricate edifice of actions and ideas that are our intellectual and emotional patrimony. We must reimagine ourselves in the form of humanity that lived and moved on this planet before the first word of the Bible was written down, before it was spoken, before it was even dreamed.

What a bizarre phenomenon the first human mutants must have appeared upon the earth. Like their primate progenitors, they were long-limbed and rangy, but, with unimpressive muscles and without significant fur or claws, confined to the protection of trees, save when they would tentatively essay the floor of the savannah--hoping to obtain food without becoming food. With their small mouths and underdeveloped teeth, their unnaturally large heads (like the heads of primate infants), they were forced back on their wits. Their young remained helpless for years, well past the infancy of other mammals, requiring from their parents long years of vigilance and extensive tutelage in many things. Without planning and forethought, without in fact the development of complex strategies, these mutants could not hope to survive at all.

But if we make use of what hints remain in the prehistorical and protohistorical "record," we must come to the unexpected conclusion that their inventions and discoveries, made in aid of their survival and prosperity--tools and fire, then agriculture and beasts of burden, then irrigation and the wheel--did not seem to them innovations. These were gifts from beyond the world, somehow part of the Eternal. All evidence points to there having been, in the earliest religious thought, a vision of the cosmos that was profoundly cyclical. The assumptions that early man made about the world were, in all their essentials, little different from the assumptions that later and more sophisticated societies, like Greece and India, would make in a more elaborate manner. As Henri-Charles Puech says of Greek thought in his seminal Man and Time: "No event is unique, nothing is enacted but once . . .; every event has been enacted, is enacted, and will be enacted perpetually; the same individuals have appeared, appear, and will appear at every turn of the circle."

The Jews were the first people to break out of this circle, to find a new way of thinking and experiencing, a new way of understanding and feeling the world, so much so that it may be said with some justice that theirs is the only new idea that human beings have ever had. But their worldview has become so much a part of us that at this point it might as well have been written into our cells as a genetic code. We find it so impossible to shed--even for a brief experiment-- that it is now the cosmic vision of all other peoples that appears to us exotic and strange.

The Bible is the record par excellence of the Jewish religious experience, an experience that remains fresh and even shocking when it is read against the myths of other ancient literatures. The word bible comes from the Greek plural form biblia, meaning "books." And though the Bible is rightly considered the book of the Western world--its foundation document--it is actually a collection of books, a various library written almost entirely in Hebrew over the course of a thousand years.

We have scant evidence concerning the early development of Hebrew, one of a score of Semitic tongues that arose in the Middle East during a period that began sometime before the start of the second millennium B.C.*--how long before we do not know. Some of these tongues, such as Akkadian, found literary expression fairly early, but there is no reliable record of written Hebrew before the tenth century B.C.--that is, till well after the resettlement of the Israelites in Canaan following their escape from Egypt under the leadership of Moses, the greatest of all proto-Jewish figures. This means that the supposedly historical stories of at least the first books of the Bible were preserved originally not as written texts but as oral tradition. So, from the wanderings of Abraham in Canaan through the liberation from Egypt wrought by Moses to the Israelite resettlement of Canaan under Joshua, what we are reading are oral tales, collected and edited for the first (but not the last) time in the tenth century during and after the kingship of David. But the full collection of texts that make up the Bible (short of the Greek New Testament, which would not be appended till the first century of our era) did not exist in its current form till well after the Babylonian Captivity of the Jews--that is, till sometime after 538 B.C. The last books to be taken into the canon of the Hebrew Bible probably belong to the third and second centuries B.C., these being Esther and Ecclesiastes (third century) and Daniel (second century). Some apocryphal books, such as Judith and the Wisdom of Solomon, are as late as the first century.

To most readers today, the Bible is a confusing hodgepodge; and those who take up the daunting task of reading it from cover to cover seldom maintain their resolve beyond a book or two. Though the Bible is full of literature's two great themes, love and death (as well as its exciting caricatures, sex and violence), it is also full of tedious ritual prescriptions and interminable battles. More than anything, because the Bible is the product of so many hands over so many ages, it is full of confusion for the modern reader who attempts to decode what it might be about.

But to understand ourselves--and the identity we carry so effortlessly that most "moderns" no longer give any thought to the origins of attitudes we have come to take as natural and self-evident--we must return to this great document, the cornerstone of Western civilization. My purpose is not to write an introduction to the Bible, still less to Judaism, but to discover in this unique culture of the Word some essential thread that runs through it, to uncover in outline the sensibility that undergirds the whole structure, and to identify the still-living sources of our Western heritage for contemporary readers, whatever color of the belief-unbelief spectrum they may inhabit.

To appreciate the Bible properly, we cannot begin with it. All definitions must limit or set boundaries, must show what the thing-to-be-defined is not. So we begin before the Bible, before the Jews, before Abraham--in the time when reality seemed to be a great circle, closed and predictable in its revolutions. We return to the world of the Wheel.

*Recently, the designations B.C.E. (before the common era) and C.E. (common era), used originally in Jewish circles to avoid the Christim references contained in the designations B.C. (before Christ) and A.D. (anno dom~n~, in the year of the Lord), have g.uned somewhat wider currency. I use B.C. and A.D. not to cause offense to anyone but because the new designations, still largely unrecognized outside scholarly circles, can unnecessarily disorient the common reader.

  

From the Hardcover edition.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: The Jews Are It 1
I The Temple in the Moonlight: The Primeval Religious Experience 9
II The Journey in the Dark: The Unaccountable Innovation 51
III Egypt: From Slavery to Freedom 91
IV Sinai: From Death to Life 123
V Canaan: From Tribe to Nation 165
VI Babylon: From Many to One 203
VII From Then Till Now: The Jews Are Still It 243
Notes and Sources 253
The Books of the Hebrew Bible 266
Chronology 271
Acknowledgments 274
Index of Biblical Citations 277
General Index 281
Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

1. The first books of the Bible were originally preserved as oral tradition. Discuss the ways in which oral tradition, despite its missing or inaccurate detail, can preserve essential truths.

2. Does the author give the Jews too much credit? Is philo-Semitism just as dangerous as anti-Semitism?

3. In the Sumerian Epic of Gilgamesh, a woman is used to tame and civilize the man/beast Enkidu. Talk about the change that the Jews gave to our perception of women. Of their role, their nature, their abilities, their responsibilities.

4. God told Avram to "go forth" and "Avram went." The author points to these bold words in literature. Discuss these and other bold words from stories and novels you've read. For instance, "Reader, I married him, " in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre. In what ways does simplicity of language enhance boldness of thought?

5. Discuss the idea of individuality as the "flip side of monotheism" [p. 72].

6. YHWH is a verb form. Discuss the significance and differences between the three interpretations of this word: I am who am; I am who I am; I will be there with you [p. 109].

7. The Israelites told their stories in real time, fixing them here on Earth with some attempt at writing history, not myth, unlike the ancient Sumerians and other civilizations before them who saw reality as the drama of eternity. Discuss this change.

8. Would you drop or add anything from the Ten Commandments, especially from those that have to do with human beings? Or, do you agree, as the author states, that in considering these commandments, "Both believer and unbeliever are brought to heel" [p.143]?

9. Discuss the idea that anti-Semitism has its source in hatred of God and hatred of the unyielding Ten Commandments--a hatred that the hater must hide from him or herself [p. 153].

10. The Bible shows us that God's fire "will perfect us, will not destroy" us. How is understanding and accepting this different from having a fateful, cyclical vision of the world?

11. Several times in the book, the author refers to the struggles of black slaves in the American South as similar in some ways to the struggles of the Israelites. Discuss the historical and current relationship between African/Americans and Jews.

12. Discuss the change from the early Israelite's "theocratic democracy" to earthly monarchy, with the anointing of Saul as king.

13. David, the poet, the leader, is a very flawed king and man. How is this part of his strength and appeal? In what ways does God's relationship with humans change and deepen as a result of David's story?

14. Discuss the personal emotion in the Psalms and the great change this signals from previous writing.

15. Creative energy became diluted from generation to generation in the House of David. Do you see this in modern-day examples also? What can we do to guard against it?

16. Discuss the change from prophet/leader as in Moses, to priest/prophet as in Samuel, to priests/politicians who don't speak any disruptive truths, to the outsiders (Elijah and Hosea) as the ones who hear and speak God's words, and finally to Isaiah, yet another kind of prophet.

17. Elijah hears the "still, small voice" on the mountainside. Discuss the physical manifestations of God in the Torah.

For Discussion: The Hinges of History Series

1. Each book gives a piece that helps complete the picture of who we are, of our history, of our humanity and acts as a piece in a puzzle. How effective is this type of a reckoning of our past?

2. The author did not write the books in his series in strict chronological order. Instead he traces large cultural movements over many centuries. How does this choice affect the understanding of each book as a piece in the puzzle? Or as an individual work?

3. In his books, the author gets inside the heads and hearts of his subjects, using a very close third-person point of view. How does this choice strengthen his premise? Does it have limitations?

4. The author is Roman Catholic. Is he able to present these histories without being biased by his Catholicism? Does one's religion (or lack of it) necessarily constrict or color one's view?

5. Discuss the nature and history of the Irish and the Jews as read in these books. What are their ambitions, their differences? How do they differ from the Romans and the Greeks in all three books?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 34 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2002

    Judaism Stands Alone

    Artifacts and documents have surfaced recently that give testimony on how both Christianity and Islam both plagerized Judaism and still try to link themselves to the G-d of Israel while being anti-Semitic. This author has not taken into account all the miracles and titles used in the New Testament were originally from Mithra, Egyptian paganism, Buddhism and even Hinduism. Also, he neglects to mention how Hellenistic both Christianity and Islam became and changed their commitment to the Noah Covenent into a new religion that far from resembles what the Almighty instructed the Jews to be and do, even today. This author missed the mark on how Romanized the New Testament is which includes our own US gov't policies and court system, a far cry from the Supreme Court (Sanhedrin) of the nation of Israel under King David and King Solomon. Actually, Native American religions can relate closer to Judaism than any other, especially the original Cherokee beliefs & customs.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2001

    Required Reading

    Thomas Cahill is one of those rare authors who takes a subject and, with study, insight, and masterful style, increases our understanding of not only that subject but also the world in which it lives. All of Cahill's books are 'must reads.' His input is priceless.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2000

    Cahill increases our understanding

    This book is chockfull of original thinking and presents in a clear, concise way the contributions of the early Jewish people to civilization. Cahill shows how the Jews moved us from a cyclical to a processive worldview. They gave us the concept that time has a start and an end, and replaced the world seen as a wheel by a world as a journey. Life came to have value and people developed a conscience. All of this and the Ten Commandments too. This book is a must read and buy.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2000

    Wow!

    At first the author left me speechless. I couldn't believe one could be so egomanical regarding the Jews. Ten stars for best part in the book, 'We know they (dimmest ancestors) looked up at the night sky in wonder, wandered...vague notion of a destination, and heard the prompting of an inner voice...'(p 169) Relevant then and now. Ten stars for his effort in admiting to prior similarities in literature (Gilgamesh Epic) that predates the Bible and that there might exist absurdities and contradictions in the Bible. He tries, but then retracts, 'We are not merely creating literature: we are retelling a personal story that really happened...' (p 129) Minus twenty stars for trying to laugh and shrug off Abraham's lies and cowardly acts in passing off Sari as his sister (p 66). Then with 'Good' God's help punishing the innocent victims of his deceit and walking away loaded with blackmailed wealth. This entertaining act was so successful he did it twice. The author calls it comic and almost a vaudeville routine! Following are a FEW firsts by Jews: 1. First to value education (p 144). Prehistoric people had no feelings of learning values? 2. Jews invented 'history' and the 'new' as positive values. No history or new as positive values prior to the Jews? 3. 'Many new things...but faith most of all, which prior to Avraham had no place in religious feeling and imagination.' (p l93-4) No faith in early religious feelings and imaginations before the Jews? 5. Semitic's invented the alphabet and was developed by Phoenician scribes and then admits it was borrowed from hieroglyphics. (footnote p. 150) 6. Joseph Campbell FORCES evidence to infer that all religions are cyclical, mythical, and ahistorical. Author categorically states all religions EXCEPT the Judeo-Christian religions. (no comment) William Carl Eichman in Catal Huyuk: The Temple of Prehistoric Anatolia called Jerico (9000 BC) an armed trading post and less than half the size of Catal Huyuk (6,500 BC and still being excavated to lower levels)the first city. Jews are a very important part of 'it', but discounting the efforts of the rest of the human race is pretty 'wild'! Three stars for motivating me to do some checking.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2000

    The Jews ARE it

    Cahill is an excellent writer and historian. He provides a history of the Bible, but places historical evidence above the 'Word of God', unlike many who have written about this book. It's about the Jews have been given credit for their enormous contribution to the world.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2014

    Jhaiyo {[ Bushes ]}

    Where the Halvidar and Naik rest.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2014

    =^-^= kittychloe&hearts

    Age 15: name:chloe: power: i turn cat form time to time and i shoot electricity out of my hands/paws when angry or someone hurts me: weakness: water: strength: electricity: (i turn cat form not knowing how to because a curse set to me at 12)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2014

    Fade bio

    Species:fox
    Talent: sneaking around never noticed by anyone!!.
    Personality: fun wise smart funny clever very clever
    Age: 22 moons
    Mate:none
    Pups: none
    Kin: felix her brother
    History: :3:3

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2014

    Waterwalker

    Name Waterwalker age 29 moons species wolf.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2014

    Ash bio

    Age: 4
    Name:ash
    Animal: phonix
    Details: golden wings and sliver eyes
    Power: heals the wounded when injured and when dies easily comes back by being reborn in fire
    Weakness:water
    Strenght: fire

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2014

    BountyFire's Bio

    Age: 27 Moons. <br> Name: BountyFire. <br> Species: Wolf. <br> Gender: &female. <br> Looks: Grey fur, with silvery blue eyes, shorter than a regular wolf. Strong looking, and feirce. <br> Personalitu: She is strong and know what to do in bad times, and help the hurt. The rest of my personality, just get to know me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2014

    Alyssa

    Long brown hair. That falls to her waist. With dimples. She's Thin. And she's 5'4

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2012

    yuck

    He did not read the same Old Testament that I am reading. I will not continue to read this filthy and world-loving book.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 22, 2011

    Disappointing

    This book rambles on and on with what seems to be an almost endless yammering that has nothing to do with the title. I did not finish reading it, I may or may not get back to it eventually.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 8, 2011

    A great attempt that succeeds and falls flat

    One thing that bothers me is the world's use of the term "Old Testament" as though with the advent of Christianity, the entire Eternal Covenant God made with Abraham had been abrogated. Nonsense. The heavens and the earth have not yet passed away, therefor, the one and only Covenant is still very much in force. Cayhill skirts the issues by virtually ignoring it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2007

    Undermines his own proof text

    I enjoyed this book very much and agree with Mr. Cahill's conclusions regarding how the philosophical foundations of Western society can be traced back to the influence of the Bible. It is blatantly obvious to the open minded individual that the Judeo-Christian ethic is the foundation for modern human rights and equality under the law among many other things. It is also very evident that the religion of the Jewish God is different than any other religion. However, Mr. Cahill would use the Bible as history and proof text on one hand then, with the other hand would undermine the authenticity of the Bible by deciding for himself which parts were historical and which parts were added later by other writers with their own agendas. I felt that with every stroke of the axe laid to the historical foundations of the Bible he chipped further away at the premise of his own conclusions.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2001

    Brings New Meaning to Old Testament

    This book explains in a very entertaining way why one-half of the people in the world are now members of an Abrahamic faith. We all know that Christianity and Islam trace their inspirations back to Abraham, but Cahill tells us why faith in the all-powerful one God is such a revolutionary and compelling idea. If you are searching for a book to bring new meaning to the Old Testament, THE GIFTS OF THE JEWS is required reading.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2000

    The main argument is wrong

    There is a basic mistake of the book, beyond that it is very well written. One should not identify the Jewish and Western civilizations. Those are two different ones and they will never meet, even if they can sometimes live closely and peacefully together. Western civilization is not born when Abraham hears the voice of God, but rather when Tales says 'all is water'. Chistianity is a vital contribution and a great part of Western civilization, but is it Jewish? The main argument of the book is wrong and it is one sided when it speaks about our civilization.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2000

    Low intellectual and moral level

    This book includes the only description of adult-child sex to which I have ever been subjected; if I had known, I wouldn't have gone through it! So you should be warned. In addition, what the author calls 'the gifts of the Jews' are actually some of the gifts of Christianity: if it had not been for Christianity, no one among the non-'chosen' would have accepted Jewish ethics. It was God's universal Dispensation that made ideas He first revealed to the ancient Hebrews prevalent in the West (and elsewhere), not some special insight of dreamy Jews. The author reads the Old Testament in a very 'Jewish' way, which is to say that he ignores the fact that the Old Testament's main function is to foreshadow the New, to show how God's Dispensation was worked out in history. If one believed Cahill, he would think the Old Testament was just a collection of quaint stories about an obscure Middle Eastern people. Amazing. (Perhaps political correctness prevents him from saying this, despite the fact that it has been the basic belief of Christianity since A.D. 33.)

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2000

    Roll over Thomas Paine

    Although I disagreed with the Author's conclusions, I recommend this book as an excellent example of how far 'believers' will go to defend and promote the Bible. To suggest the Declaration of Independence was inspired by the Jews is chutzbah. 'All men are created equal' could easily be seen as a repudiation of the Old Testament rather than an outgrowth from it. If Thomas Paine were alive today he might wonder why he bothered. It's a good thing to try and build bridges of understanding between groups of people who perceive themselves as different but to say the 'Jews are it' is not constructive in this purpose.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)