Gilded: How Newport Became America's Richest Resort
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Gilded: How Newport Became America's Richest Resort

by Deborah Davis (2)
     
 

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Newport is the legendary and beautiful home of American aristoeracy and the Sheltered super-rich. Many of the country's most famous blueblood families-the closest thing we have to royalty-have lived and summered in Newport since the nineteenth century. The Astros, the Vanderbilts, Edits Wharton, John F. Kennedy and Jacquleine Kennedy Onassis, Doris Duke, and Claus

Overview

Newport is the legendary and beautiful home of American aristoeracy and the Sheltered super-rich. Many of the country's most famous blueblood families-the closest thing we have to royalty-have lived and summered in Newport since the nineteenth century. The Astros, the Vanderbilts, Edits Wharton, John F. Kennedy and Jacquleine Kennedy Onassis, Doris Duke, and Claus and Sunny von Bulow are just a few of the many famous people who have called the city home. Through a narrative filled with engrossing characters and lively tales of untold extravagance, Gilded takes you along as you explore the fasinating heritage of the Newport elite, from its first colonists to the newest of its new millennium millionaire.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
* As a child in Rhode Island, Davis viewed Newport as “an enchanted place.” Here she traces its growth as a popular resort—as far back as 1844—with the influx of tourists prompting “enormous hotels.” On the heels of developers came mansions and elaborate garden parties, along with the smart set, literati and social climbers. (Caroline Astor established Newport as the Gilded Age's blueblood summer resort.) Examining power, privilege and upstairs/downstairs protocols, Davis (Party of the Century) looks at the town's tastemakers, loveless marriages, outrageous costume balls and extravagant dinner parties, along with social humiliations. Bringing Newport up to recent years, Davis details exclusive clubs, feuding neighbors, ostentatious socialites, controversial figures (Claus von Bülow, Doris Duke) and such eccentrics as reclusive Beatrice Turner, who secretly painted hundreds of portraits of herself. Closing chapters recount the launch of the Newport Jazz Festival and the mission of the Preservation Society to maintain historic Newport even as a “younger and hipper” crowd made changes. This light, entertaining history also displays portraitist and fashion illustrator René Bouché's superb sketches for Vogue of iconic Newporters in their signature settings. 34 b&w photos. (Nov.) (Publishers Weekly, September 8, 2009)
The grand mansions of Newport didn't just happen. Over several eventful decades, the seaside Rhode Island town gradually evolved from a relatively modest summer retreat into the most opulent resort of America's Gilded Age. In Gilded, Deborah Davis escorts us like a seasoned tour guide through the development of an affluent community where the Astors and the Vanderbilts mingled.
Publishers Weekly
As a child in Rhode Island, Davis viewed Newport as “an enchanted place.” Here she traces its growth as a popular resort—as far back as 1844—with the influx of tourists prompting “enormous hotels.” On the heels of developers came mansions and elaborate garden parties, along with the smart set, literati and social climbers. (Caroline Astor established Newport as the Gilded Age's blueblood summer resort.) Examining power, privilege and upstairs/downstairs protocols, Davis (Party of the Century) looks at the town's tastemakers, loveless marriages, outrageous costume balls and extravagant dinner parties, along with social humiliations. Bringing Newport up to recent years, Davis details exclusive clubs, feuding neighbors, ostentatious socialites, controversial figures (Claus von Bülow, Doris Duke) and such eccentrics as reclusive Beatrice Turner, who secretly painted hundreds of portraits of herself. Closing chapters recount the launch of the Newport Jazz Festival and the mission of the Preservation Society to maintain historic Newport even as a “younger and hipper” crowd made changes. This light, entertaining history also displays portraitist and fashion illustrator René Bouché's superb sketches for Vogue of iconic Newporters in their signature settings. 34 b&w photos. (Nov.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470124130
Publisher:
Turner Publishing Company
Publication date:
11/02/2009
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
309
Sales rank:
711,041
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.20(d)

Meet the Author

Deborah Davis is the author of the acclaimed Party of the Century: The Fabulous Story of Truman Capote and His Black and White Ball and Strapless: John Singer Sargent and the Fall of Madame X. She is a film executive who has worked as a story editor and a story analyst for several major film companies.

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