Gilgamesh the Hero

Overview

This is one of the oldest stories in the world, and it's about things that still matter to us today: friendship, fame, courage, happiness.

Gilgamesh and Enkidu are friends -- best friends. Together they can work wonders, fight monsters, brave earthquakes, travel the world! But waiting in the dark is the one enemy they can never overcome.

Retold by award-winning author Geraldine McCaughrean, and illustrated with great power by David Parkins, ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$16.25
BN.com price
(Save 18%)$20.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (17) from $7.93   
  • New (9) from $11.50   
  • Used (8) from $7.93   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

This is one of the oldest stories in the world, and it's about things that still matter to us today: friendship, fame, courage, happiness.

Gilgamesh and Enkidu are friends -- best friends. Together they can work wonders, fight monsters, brave earthquakes, travel the world! But waiting in the dark is the one enemy they can never overcome.

Retold by award-winning author Geraldine McCaughrean, and illustrated with great power by David Parkins, Gilgamesh the Hero is a story that will linger in the imagination long after the book has been put down.

A retelling, based on seventh-century B.C. Assyrian clay tablets, of the wanderings and adventures of the god king, Gilgamesh, who ruled in ancient Mesopotamia (now Iraq) in about 2700 B.C., and of his faithful companion, Enkidu.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The Washington Post
The world's oldest recorded story, originally carved onto clay tablets in Mesopotamia (now Iraq) some 3,000 years before Christ, is here beautifully, if very freely, retold by a distinguished British children's author. — Elizabeth Ward
Publishers Weekly
Geraldine McCaughrean retells the oldest recorded story, adapted for children, in Gilgamesh the Hero, illus. by David Parkins. The great king Gilgamesh fights Huwawa, Guardian of the Cedar Forests, slays the Bull of Heaven, seeks the secret of immortality and travels the world in this dramatic story of a powerful ruler who is both loved and hated by his people. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This is the saga of Gilgamesh, who was a real king of Uruk in Mesopotamia some time between 2700 and 3200 BC. His epic tale, the oldest known recorded story, originally was carved on a dozen stone tablets. Over the years, the tablets were broken into shards that scholars have studied, trying to piece together the story, which is, more or less, the account of Gilgamesh's perilous journey as he tries to learn the meaning of life. In the beginning Gilgamesh is a fairly typical king, intent on building monuments and waging wars and taxing his people. Then he meets Enkidu who becomes his dearest friend and together they go off on a quest. When the two men fight and kill the Bull of Heaven, the law demands punishment-one of them must die. After hearing the sentence, life seems to drain from Enkidu. When Enkidu dies, Gilgamesh finds the pain of the loss unbearable, yet he must bear it. In his grief, he begins another long and difficult journey searching for the secret of immortality. Through his journey he becomes a changed man and a kinder, more thoughtful ruler. This allegory, is skillfully, beautifully retold by the incomparable Ms. McCaughrean who has won every major prize for children's literature in Great Britain. Mr. Parkins, whose illustrations in this book are inspired by Assyrian art, has illustrated many children's books and been shortlisted for several prestigious awards. 2003, Eerdmans Books for Young Readers, Ages 9 to 12.
— Janet Crane Barley
School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-In this evocative retelling of the oldest recorded epic, McCaughrean delivers primordial themes to a modern audience. Arresting images and potent storytelling make this an impressive presentation. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
McCaughrean turns in a robust, exciting rendition of the world's oldest written epic. After many astounding feats, proud, powerful king Gilgamesh sees his beloved sidekick Enkidu die, and becomes terrified of doing the same. Abandoning self-respect, he searches the world for the secret of immortality, crosses the Waters of Death to hear the tale of undying Utnapisthim (better knows as Noah), and at last returns home, to make wiser bids for immortality by telling his tale, and raising children. Thanks to the former, as McCaughrean points out, he's better known today than Ishtar, Enlil, or any of the other "immortal" gods he fought and worshiped. Enhanced by Parkins's expressionistic tableaus of gnarled, dramatically posed figures, she relates his adventures with gusto-"Gilgamesh calmly strung his bow. 'Don't launch the funeral barge yet. What can go wrong with the two of us side by side?' 'Do you really want me to tell you?' said Enkidu"-while vividly capturing his pride, soul-deep anguish, and the personal cost of his hard-won wisdom. The most riveting retelling yet of this ancient, ageless tale. (introductory note) (Folktale. 10-14)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780802852625
  • Publisher: Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 6/28/2003
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 440,382
  • Age range: 11 - 14 Years
  • Lexile: 780L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.72 (w) x 10.36 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Geraldine McCaughrean has written more than a hundred books for children, including the award-winning Gilgames the Hero (Eerdmans). In addition, she has won every major prize for children's literature in England, including the Carnegie Medal, the Whitbread Award, and the Guardian Children's Fiction Award. Geraldine lives in England.

David Parkins has been short-listed for the Kurt Maschler and Smarties awards and commended by the National Art Library Illustration Award. He lives in Lincoln, England.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 Heaven Sent 4
2 Tamed by a Kiss 12
3 Do or Die 20
4 Marry Me 31
5 Death 42
6 Afraid of Nothing 48
7 Give Up 57
8 Faraway 67
9 The Bread of Sorrow 77
10 The Plant of Life 83
11 Home 88
12 The Twelfth Tablet 92
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)