Ginger Baker's Air Force

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Bruce Eder
For a change, the late 1960s yielded up a supergroup that lived up to its hype and then some. Ginger Baker's Air Force was recorded live at Royal Albert Hall in January of 1970 -- in fact, this may be the best-sounding live album ever to come out of that notoriously difficult venue -- at a show that must have been a wonder to watch, as the ten-piece band blazed away in sheets of sound, projected delicate flute parts behind multi-layered African percussion, or built their songs up Bolero-like, out of rhythms from a single instrument into huge jazz-cum-R&B crescendos. Considering that this was only their second gig, the group sounds astonishingly tight, which greatly ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Bruce Eder
For a change, the late 1960s yielded up a supergroup that lived up to its hype and then some. Ginger Baker's Air Force was recorded live at Royal Albert Hall in January of 1970 -- in fact, this may be the best-sounding live album ever to come out of that notoriously difficult venue -- at a show that must have been a wonder to watch, as the ten-piece band blazed away in sheets of sound, projected delicate flute parts behind multi-layered African percussion, or built their songs up Bolero-like, out of rhythms from a single instrument into huge jazz-cum-R&B crescendos. Considering that this was only their second gig, the group sounds astonishingly tight, which greatly reduces the level of self-indulgence that one would expect to find on an album where five of the eight tracks run in excess of ten minutes. There aren't too many wasted notes or phrases in the 78 minutes of music included here, and Steve Winwood's organ, Baker, Phil Seamen, and Remi Kabaka's drums, and the sax playing by Chris Wood, Graham Bond on alto, and Harold McNair, all stand out, especially the sax trio's interwoven playing on "Don't Care." Additionally, Denny Laine plays louder, flashier, more virtuoso-level guitar than he ever got to turn in with the Moody Blues, bending notes in exquisite fashion in the opening of Air Force's rendition of the Cream standard "Toad," crunching away on rhythm elsewhere, and indulging in some more introspective blues for "Man of Constant Sorrow." The original CD reissue, which sounded pretty good, was deleted in the early '90s, but this album has been remastered again and repackaged as part of the Ginger Baker retrospective Do What You Like on Polygram's Chronicles series. It's a must-own for jazz-rock, Afro-fusion, blues-rock, or percussion fans.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 3/9/2004
  • Label: Lemon Records Uk
  • EAN: 5013929762220
  • Catalog Number: 22
  • Sales rank: 3,634

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Da Man - Ginger Baker (7:16)
  2. 2 Early in the Morning - Ginger Baker (11:13)
  3. 3 Don't Care - Ginger Baker (12:32)
  4. 4 Toad - Ginger Baker (12:59)
  5. 5 Aiko Biaye - Ginger Baker (13:00)
  6. 6 Man of Constant Sorrow - Ginger Baker (3:50)
  7. 7 Do What You Like - Ginger Baker (11:47)
  8. 8 Doin' It - Ginger Baker (5:26)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Ginger Baker's Air Force Primary Artist
Ginger Baker Indexed Contributor, Percussion, Drums, Timpani
Steve Winwood Organ, Guitar, Keyboards, Vocals
Harold McNair Flute, Alto Flute, Alto Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone
Graham Bond Organ, Alto, Piano, Alto Saxophone, Vocals
Rick Grech Bass, Violin
Denny Laine Guitar, Vocals
Phil Seaman Percussion, Drums
Neemoi Acquaye Percussion, Drums
Aliki Ashman Vocals
Bud Beadle Alto Saxophone, Baritone Saxophone, Soprano Saxophone
Ken Craddock Organ, Guitar, Piano, Vocals
Kwasi "Rocky" Dzidzornu Percussion
Colin Gibson Bass Guitar
Steve Gregory Flute, Tenor Saxophone
Jeanette Jacobs Bass, Keyboards, Vocals
Catherine James Vocals
Remi Kabaka Percussion, Drums
Diane Stewart Vocals
Chris Wood Flute, Saxophone, Tenor Saxophone
Technical Credits
Ginger Baker Arranger, Composer, Producer
Bob Dylan Composer
Steve Winwood Composer
Louis Jordan Composer
Harold McNair Composer
Rick Grech Composer
Denny Laine Arranger
Jimmy Miller Producer
Roy Thomas Baker Engineer
Dallas Bartley Composer
Andy Johns Engineer
Remi Kabaka Composer
Teddy Osei Composer
Carter Stanley Composer
Sonny Boy Williamson [II] Composer
Nigel Williamson Liner Notes
Traditional Composer
Leo Hickman Composer
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 30, 2012

    1st off, read the review above by Bruce Eder, pretty much sums i

    1st off, read the review above by Bruce Eder, pretty much sums it up, journalistic-wise. As a music listener and lover, I've got some things to add. If you are in any way interested in what was great music in 1970, this disc will tell you what a lot of it consisted of. Large scale gatherings of talented people, musically, lyrically and from around the world. One catchword was experimentalization. Putting together what might not have been put together previously, with a talent pool most "pop" musicians wouldn't even think to gather. Putting everything into the mix, with an eye to what fit and keeping it from degrading into excess. The sound is wonderful, it brought world music to where there was no world music before. To a mass audience of the young people of the west where it was embraced and eaten-up like some strange and exaltatingly-new dish after the same old thing day after day.Get this, listen to it, enjoy every bite, and savor it as something new. It always sounds that way to me.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews