The Girl from Junchow

The Girl from Junchow

4.4 25
by Kate Furnivall
     
 

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An epic journey of love and discovery from the national bestselling author of The Russian Concubine and The Red Scarf.

China, 1929. For years Lydia Ivanova believed her father was killed by the Bolsheviks. But when she learns he is imprisoned in Stalin-controlled Russia, the fiery girl is willing to leave everything behind- even her Chinese

Overview

An epic journey of love and discovery from the national bestselling author of The Russian Concubine and The Red Scarf.

China, 1929. For years Lydia Ivanova believed her father was killed by the Bolsheviks. But when she learns he is imprisoned in Stalin-controlled Russia, the fiery girl is willing to leave everything behind- even her Chinese lover, Chang An Lo.

Lydia begins a dangerous search, journeying to Moscow with her half-brother Alexei. But when Alexei abruptly disappears, Lydia is left alone, penniless in Soviet Russia.

All seems lost, but Chang An Lo has not forgotten Lydia. He knows things about her father that she does not. And while he races to protect her, she is prepared to risk treacherous consequences to discover the truth.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

In her third novel, Furnivall returns to the story of Lydia Ivanova from The Russian Concubine, a Russian girl who fled the Bolsheviks and settled in Junchow, China, with her mother, who was then killed. Alone in a strange culture, Lydia learns that her father, whom she believed to be dead, is imprisoned in a labor camp. She flees China with her stepbrother, Alexei, to search for her father, leaving behind her lover, Chang An Lo, a Communist rebel. When Alexei later abandons Lydia, Lo comes to the rescue, but not before Lydia learns the terrible truth about the only family she has left. Furnivall deftly evokes the details of a bygone era, though these often take too much of a front seat and distract from Lydia's quest to find her father. Fans of Furnivall's earlier works will enjoy the chance to see what has become of Lydia. (June)

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Library Journal

For most of her life, Lydia Ivanov believed her Danish father to be dead, a victim of the Russian Revolution. Furnivall's sequel to The Russian Concubine picks up with Lydia's discovery that he is still alive, held as a prisoner of the Soviet Union. With her half-brother, Alexei, and lifelong friend and protector Liev Popkov in tow, Lydia sets off on a journey from the Chinese city of Junchow to reunite her fractured family. Close on their heels is Lydia's love interest, the Communist activist Chang An Lo, who has discovered vital information about Lydia's father that he must pass on to her. With a much tighter plot than Furnivall's last effort, this book delivers an engrossing adventure that sweeps readers along in lush waves of drama and romance. Though a few minor weak spots beg the suspension of disbelief, the unflinching and finely crafted descriptions of Russia in its Soviet infancy more than compensate. A rare sequel that is better than its predecessor, this novel will appeal to those seeking a summer beach read that mixes fascinating historical details with exciting adventure and romance.
—Leigh Wright

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780425227640
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/02/2009
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
512
Sales rank:
753,482
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

Kate Furnivall was born in Wales and currently lives in Devon, England. Married and the mother of two sons, she has working in publishing and television advertising. She drew inspiration for The Russian Concubine from her mother’s experiences as a White Russian refugee in China.

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The Girl from Junchow 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good read. Read The Jewel of St. Petersburg and The Russian Concubine first. I loved this book but it left me wanting to know more at the end. I kind of felt like it left me hanging...I hate that!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This novel captured my interest in the beginning and I truly enjoyed it. Author is amazing! Travel, family dynamics, loss, adventure and love flowed smoothly through out! I simply adored it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Michiana_Reader More than 1 year ago
Definitely read The Russian Concubine first. This one is another entertaining and satisfying read.
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Tigerpaw70 More than 1 year ago
Also published under the title "The Concubine's Secret" This novel is a captivating and fascinating sequel to "The Russian Concubine", a tale of love and danger set in the late 1920's Junchow and Moscow. The story takes us on a journey, surrounding the intricacies of Lydia Ivanova's life, a life of drama graced with a touch of passion. Lydia believes her father, Jens Friis, is still alive but held captive in Stalin's Russia. Determined to find him she teams up with her brother Alexie and close friend Popkov. The dangerous search leads them to bars of the seedy underworld where bribery of camp workers is one of their prime sources of information. In a world where they have to continually watch their backs, they befriend and betray those with key information, a treacherous game that eventually directs them to Moscow. In Russia, with everything at stake Lydia becomes entangled with a soviet officer and Alexei is drawn into the hands of Russian criminals. Popkov finds himself in the precarious position of trying to keep his friends safe even at the risk of his own live. On another front, Chang An-Lo, a high ranking officer who is advancing rapidly in the Communist party of China, is delegated to view the factories built by the Stalinist regime. He so happens to be Lydia's romantic partner while she was in China. As fate would have it, Lydia and Chang meet up at a party honouring the Chinese delegation and discuss old times. Their past strong romantic connection quickly has Chang sympathizing with her predicament and vowing to help her gather information and help in the possible rescue of her father. Ms. Furnivall rich writing is very entertaining, gripping and provides all the thrills we are accustomed to. The dialogue is crisp and the setting vividly recreates Stalin era Russia. Lydia is maturing beautifully and is portrayed as a strong and loveable character; we easily fall into her spell. Some of the plotting may lack realism with its characters getting out of sticky predicaments and injuries a bit too easily for the times, but the interaction between characters is outstanding and is one of the attributes that makes this fantasy novel one of the best
Life_Reader More than 1 year ago
If you read author Kate Furnivalls' prequel to this story, "The Russian Concubine", then "The Girl from Junchow" is a must!! You must find out what character Lydia Ivanova faces as her journey continues. This story from begining to end had me wanting more. Gripping, heart warming, lovely piece of historical fiction, a true thrill. Kate Furnivall does not disappoint!!!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Better than her first book The Russian Concubine. Usually the "sophmore" book sometimes looses some of its punch, but not in this case. I read this one faster and throughly enjoyed it a lot more. Definitely one for your collection if you enjoy reading historical fiction or just enjoy reading a good tale. Kate Furnivall has definitely proven herself to be a great storyteller. I can only hope she gives us more in future stories of Lydia and Chang An Lo.
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AuntieAlice More than 1 year ago
This is the sequel to "The Russian Concubine," which I could not put down! Lydia travels to Russia to find her father and adventure follows. Some of the same characters populate this book with a few new ones added. This book wasn't quite as good as the first book, but compared to some books, it was great. I will buy the 3rd book, if there is one. I would love to read more of these characters and the story. And the book did end feeling as if there will be a third book. Kate Furnivall does a great job with the characters, atmosphere, visualization and story line. She keeps you turning pages and not wanting to put the book down.
GranT More than 1 year ago
If you loved The Russian Concubine, you will surely love this one as much. The story is one of power-the power of love, family, friendship and survival. The characters are well developed and the secondary characters are intricately woven into the plot. The ending leaves an opening for a third book and hopefully Furnivall has already continued Lydia's story. Don't miss this one-it's a truly great read!
harstan More than 1 year ago
Fleeing with her mom from the Bolsheviks and believing her dad is dead, Russian expatriate Lydia Ivanova still struggles to adapt to being alone in Junchow, China since her mom was killed (see THE RUSSIAN CONCUBINE). Now in 1929 she learns the impossible that her father is alive though incarcerated in a labor prison. --- Leaving behind her native lover Communist Chang An Lo, Lydia and stepbrother Alexei search for her father by returning to Moscow in hope of liberating him. However, during their quest, Alexei vanishes leaving Lydia to believe he left her for expedient selfish reasons. Lo arrives to keep Lydia safe while hiding what he knows about her father, but his concealment does not prevent her from learning shockers re her family. --- THE GIRL FROM JUNCHOW is a fascinating historical sequel that brings to life time and place (China and Russia) as the heroine goes full circle returning home. Ironically the vivid descriptions that showcase 1929 Junchow, Moscow, and other locales often overwhelms the suspense subplots of Lydia's search for her dad and Lo search for Lydia. Still fans of early twentieth century tales will want to read this deep tale and its fine prequel, THE RUSSIAN CONCUBINE. --- Harriet Klausner