×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Girl from the Coast
     

The Girl from the Coast

by Pramoedya Ananta Toer, Willem Samuels (Translator), Willem Samuels (Translator)
 

See All Formats & Editions

Pramoedya's The Girl from the Coast tells the story of a beautiful young woman from a fishing village who finds herself in an arranged marriage with a wealthy aristocrat. Forced to leave her parents and home behind, she moves to the city to become the 'lady' of her husband's house. Pramoedya's breathtaking literary skill is evident in every word of this book

Overview

Pramoedya's The Girl from the Coast tells the story of a beautiful young woman from a fishing village who finds herself in an arranged marriage with a wealthy aristocrat. Forced to leave her parents and home behind, she moves to the city to become the 'lady' of her husband's house. Pramoedya's breathtaking literary skill is evident in every word of this book, one of his classic works of fiction made especially poignant because it is based on the life of his own grandmother.

Editorial Reviews

Los Angeles Times
As eloquent and sensual as James Baldwin . . . As hip and smart and bleak and dark as Dashiell Hammett . . . Pramoedya is a novelist who should get in line for the Nobel Prize.
San Francisco Chronicle
What sets The Girl From the Coast apart and makes it glow is the tremendous psychological acuity Toer brings to the subtlest of human interactions.
Boston Globe
Reads like a wistful fairy tale.
Salon.com
A compulsively readable novel.
salon.com
We can only hope more is to come.
New York Times Book Review
Pramoedya is a genuine storyteller.
KLIATT
Told by a girl whose name we never discover, this is the story of a beautiful young woman from a poor fishing family who is given in marriage to a wealthy Indonesian aristocrat. Left alone with servants in a house in the city, she longs for the sea and her village. The narrator gradually discovers she is one in a long line of "practical" marriages to her husband that, while considered valid in the peasant tradition, are not recognized as true marriages in the Islamic religion adhered to by the upper class. As her husband's relatives begin pressuring him to find a suitable wife of his own socio-economic strata, the narrator escapes home to her family and discovers her alienation from former friends and neighbors. Intrigue mounts as plots against her life are revealed and her pregnancy does not protect her in the way she assumes it would. Meanwhile, the people of the village, taken with her rags-to-riches story, craft a folksong about her and immortalize both her beauty and her sadness. This is a well-written book that moves slowly and methodically while weaving a tale featuring an exotic setting and cast of characters. The first-person voice is successful and there is much the reader can learn about the craft of writing from this work. Because of the literary nature of the book, libraries with established adult or literary fiction collections will definitely want to make it a first purchase while high school libraries focusing on more popular YA fiction may not find it suitable or appealing to their audience. KLIATT Codes: A-Recommended for advanced students and adults. 2002, Hyperion, 280p., Ages 17 to adult.
— Courtney Lewis
Library Journal
Like Filipino writer F. Sionil Jose, Indonesian dissident Toer is considered a major contender for a Nobel prize, and his latest novel demonstrates why he has earned multiple literary awards during his remarkable writing career. Based largely on his grandmother's life, this novel relates the story of the arranged marriage of a lovely, unnamed young woman who leaves her fishing village to wed a nobleman, the Bendoro. Though the Girl from the Coast, as she is known, serves her husband well, eventually she learns that she is merely a "practice wife." The Bendoro not only divorces her but also takes away her child and banishes her. In Toer's characteristically simple, fast-paced narrative style, he deftly explores the complex issues arising when the impoverished interact with the privileged and when women become property. The novel's strong sociopolitical commentary explains why the Indonesian government has banned many of Toer's books and incarcerated him for nearly 15 years. Recommended for most collections. Faye A. Chadwell, Univ. of Oregon Libs., Eugene Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786887088
Publisher:
Hachette Books
Publication date:
10/08/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
1,411,187
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.65(d)
Age Range:
13 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Pramoedya Ananta Toer is a major figure in world literature and is constantly mentioned as a likely candidate for the Nobel Prize. He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Fugitive, The Buru Quartet, and The Mute's Soliloquy, and is published in more than thirty countries. He has been profiled in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and other major publications around the world. He is the recipient of numerous literary prizes and awards, including the PEN Freedom-to-Write Award and a Hellman-Hammett Award. He lives outside Jakarta.

Willem Samuels also translated Pramoedya's The Fugitive and The Mute's Soliloquy, among other works.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews