Girl Meets Boy/Boy Meets Girl

Girl Meets Boy/Boy Meets Girl

by Chris Raschka, Vladimir Radunsky, V. Radunsky
     
 

Have you ever noticed how so many important things go in only one direction? Rain and songs, clocks and how your toenails grow and books, for instance. Wouldn't it be nice if at least one important thing could go in both directions? This book does. You can read it left to right, right to left, back and forth, forth and back. And when you read a book in two directions…  See more details below

Overview

Have you ever noticed how so many important things go in only one direction? Rain and songs, clocks and how your toenails grow and books, for instance. Wouldn't it be nice if at least one important thing could go in both directions? This book does. You can read it left to right, right to left, back and forth, forth and back. And when you read a book in two directions you may notice some things in a new way

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
With two covers and title pages and with text written both upside-down and right side-up, Raschka's quirky text resembles a Mabius strip that never stops. The ending of each story leads to the beginning of the next. Depending on which cover you start with, either "Boy meets/ green cat/ wearing nothing/ on chair/ in sunshine/ and sees/ shade in/ table under/ glasses wearing/ dog red/ meets girl," or, "Girl meets/ red dog/ wearing glasses/ under table/ in shade/ and sees/ sunshine in/ chair on/ nothing wearing/ cat green/ meets Boy." It's a clever idea but unfortunately, the text in the second half of each sentence doesn't make syntactic sense. Radunsky's (Manneken Pis) broad-stroke illustrations, like the dripping watercolors often found on a kindergarten easel create a sense of fluid motion. The figures often cleverly wrap from one turn of the page to another, and the changing font sizes complement the bright colors of his limited palette on stark white pages. As in Yo! Yes!, Raschka relies on two-word phrases to tell his story, but here the text does not add up to a cohesive whole. The reverse narrative will likely baffle readers still learning the wily ways of verbs and prepositions. Despite the book's eye-catching jacket, and Radunsky's cheery paintings, this eccentric book ultimately doesn't quite work. Ages 3-6. (Aug.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Two avant-garde children's book creators team up for an enigmatic offering, originally published in France, which they suggest reading forward, backward, and upside down ("keep reading even if you have to stand on your head!"). On each spread the text (22 words in all) appears twice, at top right side up in black type, and on the bottom, upside down and transposed in blue. In between, boldly colored, richly textured childlike paintings sprawl across the pages and illustrate the words. At the halfway point in either story, the sparse linear narrative seems to demand a change in direction, but in which direction? Moving forward, the narratives sort of make sense (though the pictures are upside down) when the words are read right to left, that is until the last pages when "Boy meets" or "Girl meets," doesn't fit with the pattern. Flipping the book at midpoint requires the same right to left reading, with the same upside-down pictures and mystifying conclusion. If this sounds confusing, it is, and while children will enjoy the playful art and may get some satisfaction from being able to read the simple words, they are likely to be lost in the puzzle of the artists' conceptualization.-Marie Orlando, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Boy meets girl and girl meets boy in a bidirectional experiment that busts linear narrative to smithereens. Both illustrations and text are exemplars of minimalism, the simple cast of characters being made up of loose daubs of bright paint, which miraculously evoke the sheer essence of things. The text reads identically both forward and backward, each word-one to a page-appearing both right-side-up and upside-down. Readers are exhorted to "keep reading . . . even if you have to stand on your head!"-an instruction they'll need to bear in mind, as the straightforward narration ("Girl meets red dog wearing glasses under table in shade and sees . . .") goes absolutely wonky once past the middle ("sunshine in chair on nothing wearing cat green meets Boy"). Likewise, the green cat sunning itself properly in a chair is, on the return trip, suddenly suspended upside-down in space-but not if you stand on your head. It's utterly brilliant in its simplicity and daring, but it remains to be seen whether concretely thinking preschoolers will be won over by the dovetailing of the narratives-or just plain mystified. (Picture book. 3-6)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9782020676083
Publisher:
Editions du Seuil
Publication date:
12/20/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 11.58(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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