Girl Meets Boy: Because There Are Two Sides to Every Story

Girl Meets Boy: Because There Are Two Sides to Every Story

3.2 12
by Kelly Milner Halls
     
 

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What do guys and girls really think? Twelve of the most dynamic and engaging YA authors writing today team up for this one-of-a-kind collection of "he said/she said" stories—he tells it from the guy's point of view, she tells it from the girl's. These are stories of love and heartbreak. There's the good-looking jock who falls for a dangerous girl, and the

Overview

What do guys and girls really think? Twelve of the most dynamic and engaging YA authors writing today team up for this one-of-a-kind collection of "he said/she said" stories—he tells it from the guy's point of view, she tells it from the girl's. These are stories of love and heartbreak. There's the good-looking jock who falls for a dangerous girl, and the flipside, the toxic girl who never learned to be loved; the basketball star and the artistic (and shorter) boy she never knew she wanted; the gay boy looking for love online and the girl who could help make it happen. Each story in this unforgettable collection teaches us that relationships are complicated—because there are two sides to every story.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Twelve writers answer Halls’s question: “What if a group of authors took on the challenge of perception—boys versus girls?” Together, they create a thoughtful collection of paired short stories (and one joint offering) that give two distinct perspectives on the same events. While romantically themed, the stories do not all end in love connections. In James Howe and Ellen Wittlinger’s stories, a gay teen learns the person he has been chatting with online is actually a girl; meanwhile, in Sarah Ryan and Randy Powell’s joint story, “Launchpad to Neptune,” a teen reunites with his first crush, only to find Stephanie has transitioned to Stephen. The most compelling twin stories may be from Terry Davis and Rebecca Fjelland Davis, which center on a Muslim immigrant and an Iowa farm girl in love; Rafi’s story explores prejudice and being caught between cultures, while Kerry begins a protest when she learns about a hog factory that will destroy their community. This story best exemplifies a theme that runs throughout: it’s impossible to know everything someone is thinking and feeling—even when you are in a relationship together. This important idea is executed with finesse throughout. Ages 14–up. (Jan.)
From the Publisher
"This is a masterful collection." —Teri Lesesne, LS 5385 Blog"

[A] proliferation of romance and hormonally charged electricity" - VOYA"

A strong choice for older teen readers" - VOYA"

Each of the authors excels at creating vibrant, sympathetic, honest characters with voices that will appeal to older teens, male and female alike.... A superb offering."
-Kirkus Reviews, starred review"

The stories are thus surprising and varied, avoiding any sort of formulaic treatment of relationship dynamics and giving full weight to the complexities of what can happen when a girl meets a boy" - Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books"

Passionate" - Booklist"

Not every set of stories works out perfectly: some are happy and others messy, giving the collection as a whole authenticity" - School Library Journal

ALAN Review - Jeuel A. Davis
The age-old tale of "he said she said" never dies when it comes to romantic relationships. Especially the teenage ones. A clever compilation of six stories told through the eyes of the male and female, the dynamic YA authors who created the stories seek to expose the roadblocks and romanticism that stem from the various and sundry misconceptions of the adolescent mind. From a tortured soul searching for real love, to an interfaith couple defying their not so compliant parents, Girl Meets Boy is the perfect piece of literature to make you ask, "If I knew the other person's point of view, could I be in a successful relationship?" Cliche, but true, there really are two sides to every story. And at the end of the day, we can always learn from our differences. Whether they help us or hurt us, they will always make us stronger. Reviewer: Jeuel A. Davis
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—All of these stories except the last are told in pairs, with female authors writing from the girls' perspective and male authors from the guys'. Each gender remembers things differently, though some of the timeframes overlap, and delivers unique information. In the first set of linked stories by Chris Crutcher and Kelly Milner Halls, Johnny wants to stop lying, so he enlists Wanda, a troubled girl with her own issues, for help. Neither of them expects to fall in love or to end up where that leads. In Joseph Bruchac's and Cynthia Leitich Smith's pair, Bobby has a crush on Nancy, a bruiser who punched her last date. Could someone that strong ever be interested in a guy who used to be bullied? And in James Howe's and Ellen Wittlinger's selections, Max is nervous about meeting a boy he has been chatting with online. He's even more surprised when it turns out that Alex is a girl. Rita Williams-Garcia, Terry Trueman, Terry Davis, Rebecca Fjelland Davis, Sara Ryan, and Randy Powell also contribute tales. Some of the characters walk the line of stereotypes, but the predictability of their attributes and actions can also lend a charming touch since boys and girls have been known to see one another just that way. Not every set of stories works out perfectly: some are happy and others messy, giving the collection as a whole authenticity. Based on the title alone, this anthology might be a hard sell for boys, even with male characters in every story, but short-story fans will enjoy it.—Melyssa Kenney, Parkville High School, Baltimore, MD
Kirkus Reviews
This conceptually unique collection of short-story pairings by a constellation of teen-literature stars explores a variety of relationship types as the respective male and female involved in each one experience them. In the first, a witty teen seeking to stop cheating on his girlfriends is drawn into a messy sexual relationship with a troubled (but hot) girl who is an abuse survivor. In another, a likable, tough girl muscles in on a bully who is harassing the object of her crush. In the third, a gay 17-year-old agrees to an in-person meeting with an online-chat buddy in a tale both sad and sweet. Two separate stories examine the strain felt by couples of different ethnic backgrounds as they struggle with prejudice and familial expectations. Finally, a boy re-encounters someone with whom he's long been enamored, only to discover she's undergone a transformation. Common themes--that are less about gender-based perceptions than they are about teens struggling to be seen and loved for who they truly are--knit these stories together. Each of the authors excels at creating vibrant, sympathetic, honest characters with voices that will appeal to older teens, male and female alike. A superb offering--and therefore a shame that its cover design of a boy and girl in a clinch makes it look like a run-of-the mill romance, which may limit its appeal. (Short stories. 14 & up)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781452111438
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
12/16/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
204
Lexile:
HL790L (what's this?)
File size:
397 KB
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

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Meet the Author

Kelly Milner Halls is the author of Albino Animals and Tales of the Cryptids, both YALSA Quick Picks for Reluctant Readers. Her writing has appeared in a variety of publications including Booklist, BookPage, Teen Reads, the Denver Post, the Atlanta Journal Constitution, the Washington Post, and many others. She lives in Spokane, Washington.

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Girl Meets Boy: Because There Are Two Sides to Every Story 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
epicrat More than 1 year ago
I loved the concept of GIRL MEETS BOY, and I think these authors did a fantastic job although I wish the stories were not quite that short and went on a little longer. Whenever I try an anthology, I worry about not finding enough stories to enjoy to make it worth the effort - but each story in GIRL MEETS BOY had a special sparkle that I ate each and every one of them up (and maybe licked my fingers afterward. Okay, and then went for seconds). Not all boy-girl pairings end in the expected happily-ever-afters, and furthermore they use romance as a diving board and splashed into more headier issues that involve gender identity, internet openness, and cultural differences. Anyone who enjoys a good dual-perspective - especially when both sides have conflicting motives – will most likely enjoy the fruits of these authors’ labor.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book its so awsome
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Some cute stories that were ok.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Woof woof.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If there is then Im not aloud to read it.