The Girl with 500 Middle Names [NOOK Book]

Overview

JANIE WHO?

It's hard enough being the new kid in school. It's even tougher when all of your new classmates live in big houses and wear expensive clothes, while your parents have little and are risking everything just to give you a chance at a better life.

Now Janie's about to do something that will make her stand out even more among the ...
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The Girl with 500 Middle Names

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Overview

JANIE WHO?

It's hard enough being the new kid in school. It's even tougher when all of your new classmates live in big houses and wear expensive clothes, while your parents have little and are risking everything just to give you a chance at a better life.

Now Janie's about to do something that will make her stand out even more among the rich kids at Satterthwaite School. Something that will have everyone wondering just who Janie Sams really is. And something that will mean totally unexpected changes for Janie and her family.

Janie's parents move to the suburbs so she can go to a better school, but when she discovers that all the other students are richer than she is, she feels out of place--until she realizes that there are more important things than money.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Haddix's (Just Ella; Running Out of Time) first novel for the Ready-for-Chapters series features a likable narrator adjusting to a new neighborhood and value system. Janie's secretary mother knits sweaters (personalized with children's names) in her spare time to sell at a fancy store and uses the extra income to fund a move from the city to the suburbs. There, third-grader Janie can attend a better public school, but all the children dress better than she does. Soon after Janie and her parents relocate, the store's owner returns all the sweaters, announcing that he has found a cheaper source. With no money for the new wardrobe her mother had promised her, Janie begins wearing the handknit sweaters to school, explaining that the embroidered monikers are her middle names. In a tidy conclusion, the girl's modeling of the sweaters inspires her mother to sell them on her own and Janie finally abandons her resistance to the kind, lonely classmate who has tried to become her friend. Despite a few overwritten passages (e.g., "I remembered how she'd knitted and knitted and knitted, early in the morning and late at night, on the bus and at home, every second she could for a solid year. Just for me. Because she loved me"), readers will likely warm up to this appealing novel's perceptive, independent-minded title character. Ages 7-10. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-Janie and her parents have been living in strapped financial circumstances since her father suffered a back injury rendering him unable to work. After observing the dilapidated state of her daughter's school, her mother decides to sell the knitwear she creates to supplement her salary and moves the family to a better school district. Though the third grader is successful academically, she is keenly aware that her classmates are better dressed than she is and she feels as if she doesn't fit in. When her mother loses her knitwear consignment position, Janie reluctantly accepts a hand-me-down coat from a classmate. She also begins wearing the specialty sweaters that were returned, hoping to arouse interest and maybe attract clientele for her mother. Since each sweater has a different moniker, the students assume that Janie has many middle names. All ends well when Mrs. Sams makes plans to sell her creations herself and Janie, no longer a loner, makes a best friend. Charcoal illustrations are scattered throughout this easy-to-read chapter book. A warmhearted tale of a self-possessed girl who is determined to make life better for her parents.-Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
BCCB
"The combination of cozy and challenging elements will make this a good fit for many young readers."
Library Talk
"This thoughtful story shows a girl's faith in family, the importance of welcoming new students, and that money really isn't everything. Recommended."
From the Publisher
"Readers will likely warm up to this appealing novel's perceptive, independent-minded title character."

"A warmhearted tale of a self-possessed girl who is determined to make life better for her parents."

"The combination of cozy and challenging elements will make this a good fit for many young readers."

"This thoughtful story shows a girl's faith in family, the importance of welcoming new students, and that money really isn't everything. Recommended."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442457805
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 2/14/2012
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 606,901
  • Age range: 7 - 10 Years
  • File size: 7 MB

Meet the Author

Margaret Peterson Haddix is the author of many critically and popularly acclaimed YA and middle grade novels, including The Missing series and the Shadow Children series. A graduate of Miami University (of Ohio), she worked for several years as a reporter for The Indianapolis News. She also taught at the Danville (Illinois) Area Community College. She lives with her family in Columbus, Ohio. Visit her at HaddixBooks.com.
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Read an Excerpt

Girl with 500 Middle Names


By Margaret Peterson Haddix

Turtleback Books Distributed by Demco Media

Copyright ©2001 Margaret Peterson Haddix
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0606206728

Chapter One

"Good-bye, broken chalkboard," I whispered. "Good-bye, cracked floor."

Cross-eyed Krissy turned around and glared at me. Nobody's supposed to call her that, but everybody does -- just not to her face. Krissy had to go through first grade two times, so she's older and bigger than the rest of us third graders. Nobody messes with her. But it's hard not to stare at her eyes. They don't look in the same direction at the same time. At the beginning of last year, I asked her if she could teach me how to do that with my eyes. I thought it was a talent, like whistling or walking on your hands. Cross-eyed Krissy looked at me -- first with one eye, then the other -- and then she spit right on my shoes. Everybody told me I was lucky she didn't beat me up.

Now I shrank down in my seat, like I did every time Cross-eyed Krissy turned around.

"What are you talking about?" she growled.

I reminded myself I wouldn't see Krissy ever again after today either. I spoke up, bold as brass.

"I'm saying good-bye," I said. "I'm going to a new school on Monday."

"Yeah?" Krissy said.

"Yeah," I said, suddenly too full of my news to keep it to myself. "And it's nice. It doesn't have any brokenwindows at all. It's got carpet three inches thick in all the classrooms, my momma says. And all the kids get to work on computers. And they have a reading corner in the library with fairy-tale people painted on the wall."

Krissy squinted at me. One eye seemed to look off to where one of our classroom windows had been covered with plywood all year long. The other eye just showed white. It was a scary thing, Krissy squinting.

"You're lying," she said, playing with the bottom part of her desk, where it came loose all the time. It made a tapping noise, like a drum. "There ain't no schools like that."

"Children," our teacher, Mrs. Stockrun, said from behind her desk at the front. "I should not be hearing any noise right now. Aren't you doing your worksheets?"

But she didn't even look up. I think she was reading a magazine. One of the boys blew a spitball at her desk.

"I am not lying," I told Krissy.

Cassandra from across the aisle looked over at us.

"She's telling the truth," she told Krissy. "I heard Mrs. Stockrun tell Mrs. Mungo during recess, someone's leaving. 'One less paper to grade,' she said."

I felt sad, all of a sudden, that Mrs. Stockrun wasn't going to miss me any more than that. But I wasn't going to miss her, either.

"So she's leaving," Krissy said, like she didn't want to be proved wrong. "That don't mean she's going someplace nice."

Cassandra was turning a bad word someone had written on the top of her desk into a flower. It had hundreds of petals, and leaves dangling like ivy. It was the prettiest thing I'd ever seen drawn on a desk.

"Oh, she is. I heard that, too," Cassandra said. She heard everything. "Mrs. Stockrun said she's going to the suburbs."

Krissy frowned. I wondered if she'd hit Cassandra for talking back to her. I just wanted to get out of this school without seeing another fight. But Krissy was frowning at me.

"How?" she asked. She was puzzled, not mad. "You're just as poor as the rest of us. How you gonna go to a school like that?"

"Sweaters," I said.

Copyright © 2001 by Margaret Peterson Haddix



Continues...


Excerpted from Girl with 500 Middle Names by Margaret Peterson Haddix Copyright ©2001 by Margaret Peterson Haddix. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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First Chapter

Chapter One

"Good-bye, broken chalkboard," I whispered. "Good-bye, cracked floor."

Cross-eyed Krissy turned around and glared at me. Nobody's supposed to call her that, but everybody does — just not to her face. Krissy had to go through first grade two times, so she's older and bigger than the rest of us third graders. Nobody messes with her. But it's hard not to stare at her eyes. They don't look in the same direction at the same time. At the beginning of last year, I asked her if she could teach me how to do that with my eyes. I thought it was a talent, like whistling or walking on your hands. Cross-eyed Krissy looked at me — first with one eye, then the other — and then she spit right on my shoes. Everybody told me I was lucky she didn't beat me up.

Now I shrank down in my seat, like I did every time Cross-eyed Krissy turned around.

"What are you talking about?" she growled.

I reminded myself I wouldn't see Krissy ever again after today either. I spoke up, bold as brass.

"I'm saying good-bye," I said. "I'm going to a new school on Monday."

"Yeah?" Krissy said.

"Yeah," I said, suddenly too full of my news to keep it to myself. "And it's nice. It doesn't have any broken windows at all. It's got carpet three inches thick in all the classrooms, my momma says. And all the kids get to work on computers. And they have a reading corner in the library with fairy-tale people painted on the wall."

Krissy squinted at me. One eye seemed to look off to where one of our classroom windows had been covered with plywood all year long. The other eye just showed white. It was a scary thing, Krissy squinting.

"You're lying," she said, playing with the bottom part of her desk, where it came loose all the time. It made a tapping noise, like a drum. "There ain't no schools like that."

"Children," our teacher, Mrs. Stockrun, said from behind her desk at the front. "I should not be hearing any noise right now. Aren't you doing your worksheets?"

But she didn't even look up. I think she was reading a magazine. One of the boys blew a spitball at her desk.

"I am not lying," I told Krissy.

Cassandra from across the aisle looked over at us.

"She's telling the truth," she told Krissy. "I heard Mrs. Stockrun tell Mrs. Mungo during recess, someone's leaving. 'One less paper to grade,' she said."

I felt sad, all of a sudden, that Mrs. Stockrun wasn't going to miss me any more than that. But I wasn't going to miss her, either.

"So she's leaving," Krissy said, like she didn't want to be proved wrong. "That don't mean she's going someplace nice."

Cassandra was turning a bad word someone had written on the top of her desk into a flower. It had hundreds of petals, and leaves dangling like ivy. It was the prettiest thing I'd ever seen drawn on a desk.

"Oh, she is. I heard that, too," Cassandra said. She heard everything. "Mrs. Stockrun said she's going to the suburbs."

Krissy frowned. I wondered if she'd hit Cassandra for talking back to her. I just wanted to get out of this school without seeing another fight. But Krissy was frowning at me.

"How?" she asked. She was puzzled, not mad. "You're just as poor as the rest of us. How you gonna go to a school like that?"

"Sweaters," I said.

Copyright © 2001 by Margaret Peterson Haddix

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Reading Group Guide

ABOUT THE BOOK

Janie's parents move to the suburbs so she can go to a better school, but when she discovers that all the other students are richer than she is, she feels out of place — until she realizes that there are more important things than money.

THEMES

School stories; Family life; Friendship; Determination

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

• How does your school compare to the two grade schools Janie goes to?

• Do clothes tell what a person is like? If so, what? If not, why not?

• Would you be willing to offer a coat to someone who obviously needs one? How would you go about doing it?

• Why did the specialty shop owner give Janie's mother back the sweaters? Is it fair to do business in this way? Who actually benefits from this practice?

• How are the classmates in the two schools portrayed?

ACTIVITIES

• Find someone who knows how to knit and have the class learn basic knit and purl stitches.

• Find out how much a winter coat that you want costs. How many hours would someone have to work for that coat if they earned minimum wage; a dollar more; two times more than minimum wage, etc.?

• What countries do stores such as Wal-Mart, Kmart, Dillard's, or JC Penney's buy their clothes from? How much is someone in those countries paid to make these clothes?

This reading group guide is for classroom, library, and reading group use. It may be reproduced in its entirety or excerpted for these purposes.

Prepared by Julie Tomlianovich

© William Allen White Children's Book Award

Please visit http://www.emporia.edu/libsv/wawbookaward/ for more information about the awards and to see curriculum guides for other master list titles.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(3)

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2012

    Yucky

    Hate it. It has not much detail and she goes to the point quickly

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2012

    SO-SO

    Not very good book ibelive thaat it just ended to early. And what is this about bad mouthing ella enchanted?????????

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2012

    soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo good

    The besssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssstttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttt book ever

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2014

    Agreed?

    Of course Pewdiepie rocks... but why did you put that as a review? (In reply to J)

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2013

    Cool

    Awesome

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2013

    J

    Suck like penis pewdiepie rocks

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2012

    Ok book

    The book was ok it was just to short

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    How long is it

    Ugugijgittdihhggd howww looong isss ittt!!!!!!!!!!!!!???????????

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2000

    What? A Girl With How Many Middle Names

    This book is good but I clearly do not understand why this author bad mouths Ella Enchanted. Ella Enchanted is a great book even if you think Ella is a pitiful teenage girl. This book lets out imagination and creativity. I am a young reader and I enjoy reading it.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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