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Girlology's There's Something New About You: A Girl's Guide to Growing Up
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Girlology's There's Something New About You: A Girl's Guide to Growing Up

4.7 11
by Melisa Holmes, Patricia Hutchison
 

You're at that age when there is a lot going on. First bras . . . hair growing on your legs . . . changing friendships . . . and periods. Some of it makes you feel embarrassed, some of it makes you want to scream, and some of it makes you want to roll your eyes and crawl under a rock. Welcome to puberty.
Right now you can't imagine how any of this could be fun

Overview

You're at that age when there is a lot going on. First bras . . . hair growing on your legs . . . changing friendships . . . and periods. Some of it makes you feel embarrassed, some of it makes you want to scream, and some of it makes you want to roll your eyes and crawl under a rock. Welcome to puberty.
Right now you can't imagine how any of this could be fun. But read this book and you can face the weirdness, get over the gross-factor, and head into puberty with confidence and knowledge. It's definitely not a boring lecture like you hear in school. And it's not like an embarrassing little chat with your parents. It was written by two female doctors who are also moms (and they're pretty funny). In addition to the advice, there are great stories about a cast of characters who are going through the same things you may be: Claire thinks she'll never develop; Lily is embarrassed to shop for her first bra; Riley is mortified when she gets her period at her dad's house; Brianna doesn't know what to say when the boys tease her; and Tess is worried about whether or not her tampon will stay in at the swim meet.
There's Something New About You will help you make sense of a very confusing time!

Editorial Reviews

Midwest Book Review

The Health/Medicine Shelf

Girlology's There's Something New About You
Melisa Holmes, M.D. & Trish Hutchison, M.D.
Health Communications, Inc.
3201 S.W. 15th Street, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442-8190
9780757315268 $12.95 www.hcibooks.com 1-800-441-5569

Ob-gyn Melisa Holmes, M.D. and pediatrician Trish Hutchison, M.D. (both of whom are also mothers) present Girlology's There's Something New About You: A Girl's Guide to Growing Up, the third book in the Girlology series. There's Something New About You is especially for young girls age 8-12, facing the bodily changes of puberty - not just the development of breasts and the onset of menstruation, but also learning how to manage new and sometimes uncomfortably strong emotions, getting proper nutrition, acne do's and don'ts, and much more. A handful of color illustrations enhance this down-to-earth, user-friendly guide that doesn't talk down to young girls confronting a challenging phase in their lives. Highly recommended, both as a gift to any young girl and for school and public library collections.

VOYA - Amanda McFadden
Girlology's There's Something New About You: A Girl's Guide to Growing Up is a book about the trials of puberty and growing up. Claire, Riley, Brianna, and Lily are friends who ask the hard questions. Frank and honest answers that cover many issues associated with puberty are provided by the authors, who are both doctors. There is something for every girl in this informative guide to puberty. The authors have taken a no-nonsense approach to the changes girls experience. For more sensitive readers, this approach, along with some of the information, may prove a little too informative, although if readers persist, they will emerge well prepared to face the challenges ahead. Advice is well covered, from bullying to bras, periods to cleanliness, and friendship to eating well. Everyday language, as well as "agony aunt" style letters at the beginning of each chapter, makes the information more accessible for young teens, who will feel more comfortable when they know others are dealing with the same issues. The graphics are informative without being offensive; pictures of the friends are cute and appealing, giving a fresh lightheartedness to the book. This is a must-have book for all homes and libraries. Reviewer: Amanda McFadden

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780757315268
Publisher:
Health Communications, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/01/2010
Pages:
122
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
12 - 16 Years

Read an Excerpt

Claire

Lily is my best friend in the whole world. We've known each other since we were three—almost nine years. She is pretty and smart and nice. We do everything together. We have always done everything together. When Lily learned to swim, I learned to swim. When Lily took ballet lessons,
I took ballet. When Lily took horseback riding lessons, I did, too. Although she was always a little more graceful and a little better at everything than me, it never seemed to matter. I would try harder and I could hang in there. If I put my mind to it, I could do what she did.

We tell each other everything. We have no secrets. We know the names of each other's secret crushes. We tell each other every little embarrassing thing that happens. She is the one person that knows me better than anyone else. I have always loved my friend Lily. Actually, everybody loves Lily.

But today, if I hear the name Lily, I will scream! I will scream so loud it will shatter a window. If I think about my best friend, I will get so angry, I will throw something. The thing is, she hasn't done anything to me. Nothing. Nada. Zip. She's always super nice. I mean, if you knew her, you would totally be on her side. But it's just not fair! Everything is easy for her. Did I mention that she is perfect in every way?

Nothing is easy for me. I am too small, too skinny, and not too great at math. My mother says, 'Claire, you are the perfect you. You are beautiful and smart.' Well, duh, she's like my mom. What else is she going to say? But she's wrong. All of my friends are looking older. They are 'developing' as Ms. Schwartz, our science teacher, says. Me? I could still pass for a seven-year-old! What if I am some sort of freak that never develops?

Lily just called me. From her new cell phone! I try to be excited for her. Listening to her happy, squeaking voice, I forget about how frustrated I am and how perfect she is. Still, I am now officially the last girl I know who doesn't have a cell phone. My mother says that I am too young for one. She doesn't understand why I would need a phone. Once again,
she thinks that I am just a kid. She thinks that because I am small, I am too little to be taken seriously. Well, my mother seriously makes me a little crazy!

Q

Does the word 'puberty' make you want to roll your eyes? Does it sound like some grown-up word that comes before a very embarrassing talk? Puberty can be confusing, embarrassing, and exciting all at once. That's the way it is for almost everyone. Reading a book about it may seem really awkward or really helpful, or maybe a little of both.

The more you learn about your body and the way it works, the less embarrassing it will be. It's even pretty interesting sometimes, and you'll be glad you know what's going on. Even though you will be reading about some awkward stuff, like breasts growing, pubic hairs sprouting, acne blooming, and periods starting, you'll find it less embarrassing as you learn more. You may think some of what you learn here is gross, some of it is neat, and some of it . . . well, you may not really know what to think about some of it. That's all normal! We'll teach you some things that will make puberty easier to understand and easier to talk about. We promise you three things by the end of this book:

1. -You'll be proud you know so much.
2. -You will be more comfortable asking questions about growing up.
3. -You will be more comfortable talking about your body and the amazing (and sometimes confusing) things it does.

What Is Puberty, Anyway?

Puberty is a pretty unusual word. What exactly does it mean? Well, the word 'puberty' comes from a Latin word, pubertas, which means 'adulthood.' It also comes from another Latin word, pubescere, which means 'to grow hairy or mossy.' Hmmm. That's pretty descriptive.

To say it simply, puberty is the process of growing up. It's the time when your body changes from a child to an adult. For girls, it takes about five years to get all the way through puberty, but the most noticeable changes happen over about three years. Most girls start puberty between the ages of eight and twelve. Most boys start between ten and fourteen. So remember, sometimes it may seem like you are the only one dealing with body changes, but everyone goes through puberty.

Meet the Author

Melisa Holmes, M.D., an OB-GYN and mother of three girls, is a nationally recognized expert in the area of pediatric and adolescent gynecology, and has also been named among the Best Doctors in America. She has been providing healthcare to girls, teens, and young adults for more than twelve years.

Patricia Hutchison, M.D., mother of two girls, is a pediatrician with the Medical University of South Carolina in the Adolescent Medicine department. For over a decade, she has been a constant in the lives of many adolescent girls, and has been named among the Best Doctors in America.

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Girlology's There's Something New About You: A Girl's Guide to Growing Up 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
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horsekid More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
FlamingoKate More than 1 year ago
The topics and flow of the book are very user-friendly in language and illustrations. The subjects are current, relevant and clearly the issues that are front and center in our children's lives. I feel so much better equipped to have the upcoming "discussions" with my girl now. Chapter two, Can We Be Friends? deals beautifully with the subjects of bullies, cliques and being friends. It provides a checklist and dialogue that will help girls through some awkward situations. After you read the book, you will want to log on to the Girlology website to see if there is a seminar in your town soon. I am anxious to read the next two books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you arnt gonna write or rate this book...then get off! Children reads theses books for help and guidience