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Girls Can Tell
     

Girls Can Tell

4.5 4
by Spoon
 

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Time may not exactly heal all wounds, but it can lend the perspective and strength to channel pain into something positive. Such is the case with Spoon; their perennial indie rock underdog status and disastrous stint on Elektra have focused and tempered the trio's brash energy instead of crushing it. Their third full-length, Girls Can Tell

Overview

Time may not exactly heal all wounds, but it can lend the perspective and strength to channel pain into something positive. Such is the case with Spoon; their perennial indie rock underdog status and disastrous stint on Elektra have focused and tempered the trio's brash energy instead of crushing it. Their third full-length, Girls Can Tell, reflects the group's lean, hungry stance in its spare, spiky, immaculately crafted songs. "Take the Fifth" and "Take a Walk" take Spoon's smart, bouncy, slightly tough signature sound to another level; while the ghosts of the Pixies, Nirvana, and Elvis Costello still haunt songs like "Lines in the Suit," Girls Can Tell's sharp wordplay, barbed guitars, and appealingly raw vocals prove that the group embraces their influences without becoming slaves to them. Britt Daniel's increasingly eclectic and expansive songwriting comes to the forefront on "Everything Hits at Once," a taut, brooding pop song driven by vibes, keyboards, yearning, and pride; "Me and the Bean" suggests the direction alternative/indie rock should have taken after Nirvana's implosion. This album is also Spoon's most emotionally eclectic collection of songs, ranging from "Anything You Want," a sunny pop song drawn with just a few artfully placed strokes to "1020 AM," a brooding, slightly psychedelic piece of folk-rock that recalls Daniel's Drake Tungsten side project. "This Book Is a Movie," an appropriately tense, filmic instrumental, and "Chicago at Night," a slightly spooky pop song with winding guitars and an off-kilter melody, complete Girls Can Tell, making it Spoon's most mature, accomplished work to date and a fine balance of fire and polish.

Editorial Reviews

CMJ New Music Report
It's only January, but one of 2001's best rock albums has already arrived, with a wealth of pop songwriting and instrumental acumen that sets the bar intimidatingly high. Cheryl Botchick

Product Details

Release Date:
02/20/2001
Label:
Merge Records
UPC:
0036172949526
catalogNumber:
29495
Rank:
25628

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Girls Can Tell 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
YES! when its by spoon. This cd is their best yet. It is truly great music, the lyrics are so unpredictably awsome and the sound of Britt Daniels voice will put you in a wonderfull state of Euphoria. Don't be a just buy one Cd buy them ALL!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I first listened to this album, I thought it was good, but I wasn't totally in love with it. After a few listens, and after attending one of their amazing shows, I realized how BEAUTIFUL their music is. Most of the songs on this album are relatively simple, letting the lyrics, Daniel's voice, and the excellently-crafted hooks leave their imprint on the listener. My favorites are "Everything Hits at Once", "Lines in the Suit", "The Fitted Shirt", and "1020 Am". The first time around I listened for hooks, the second time I listened for lyrics, and now I continue to listen to this album because each one so perfectly captures a mood and a story - you can feel it in your heart and picture it in your mind.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Probably Spoon's worst album if only because they play it safe structurally and sonically compared to their other albums. Still, very highly recommened.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago