×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Girls' Guide to Starting Your Own Business
     

Girls' Guide to Starting Your Own Business

3.7 9
by Caitlin Friedman, Kimberly Yorio
 

Tired of doing all the work for your boss but reaping none of the financial benefits? Fed up with working 60 hours a week for someone else? Want to start your own business but afraid to take the leap?

Packed with practical advice on every aspect of self-employment, along with useful Web sites, checklists, and quizzes, The Girl's Guide to Starting Your Own

Overview

Tired of doing all the work for your boss but reaping none of the financial benefits? Fed up with working 60 hours a week for someone else? Want to start your own business but afraid to take the leap?

Packed with practical advice on every aspect of self-employment, along with useful Web sites, checklists, and quizzes, The Girl's Guide to Starting Your Own Business is the book that Caitlin Friedman and Kimberly Yorio each searched for when they left the corporate world behind to start their own public relations companies. When they merged their businesses into one company, Friedman and Yorio vowed to record the process and create a truly useful guide for other women entrepreneurs.

The Girl's Guide to Starting Your Own Business streamlines the vast information needed to launch your business. From starting with the big question: Are you the girl to run the show? to writing a business plan to understanding your legal obligations and getting your name out there in the marketplace. So, here's the lowdown on how to take your business idea and run with it!

But don't just take Friedman and Yorio's word for it — women business owners from a wide range of industries offer their own start-up stories, advice, and opinions.

The Girl's Guide to Starting Your Own Business speaks to women in a way no business book has — relating frank, useful, and professional advice with all the energy, enthusiasm, and fun of a girl's night out.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Friedman and Yorio take girl power corporate in their friendly guide for women who want to start their own business. The two media mavens (they started their own PR agency in 2000, after working as publicists at Broadway Books and Artisan, as well as other media companies) offer a lighthearted alternative to books that teach readers "how to sound like a man and think like a man." Clearly experienced, Friedman and Yorio know launching a business is no walk in the park. They warn readers of all the bad stuff that comes with being the boss: feeling out of sync with the rest of the world, having to manage employees, being forced to rely on customers and clients and being responsible for knowing about taxes. But they also exalt the pleasures of being in charge. Their book covers virtually every aspect of running the show in language that isn't industry-specific, so it doesn't matter what kind of business readers want to start. Friedman and Yorio move from assessing finances and writing business plans to hiring employees and advertising. Their advice is always sound, if at times obvious (e.g., eat breakfast before business meetings, so your stomach doesn't grumble). And they give readers a break from their relentless cheerleading with sidebars featuring interviews with other successful female business owners, lists of inspirational "chick flicks" (like Baby Boom and Sliding Doors) and worksheets for calculating budgets. Their savoir faire and enthusiasm are infectious. Agent, Angela Miller. (Jan.) Forecast: A Today Show appearance on January 9 will get things moving for this sassy guide, and it's been selected as a spring alternate of the Country Homes and Gardens Book Club. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Despite the cutesy title, this book is full of useful information for those starting their own business, whether they are male or female. The authors left the publishing industry to start their own public relations firm and could not find information on starting a business that was geared toward women. Hence this book, which opens with a chapter on evaluating whether one should start a business and then moves into what type of venture should be started and the legal and financial aspects of ownership. The authors stress the importance of a business plan and give advice on how to choose a name and a logo and how to promote your business. Other chapters include information on hiring personnel, being a boss, acting like a professional, and using technology. Interspersed throughout are helpful questions as well as interviews with successful businesswomen. This book joins Sharon Whiteley & others' The Old Girls Network: Insider Advice for Women Building Businesses in a Man's World as a useful guide for women entrepreneurs. Recommended for public and academic libraries.-Stacey Marien, American Univ., Washington, DC Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060521578
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
12/23/2003
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.93(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Girl's Guide to Starting Your Own Business
Candid Advice, Frank Talk, and True Stories for the Successful Entrepreneur

Chapter One

"Are You the Girl to Run the Show?"

Stand up and walk to the nearest mirror. Take a long, hard look at the woman you see there. Now ask yourself, "Can I look to this woman for all the support, security, and leadership I need to survive?" Then ask that person in the mirror, "Do you want to be responsible for all the support, security, and leadership that I, the person holding the book, need?"

This chapter will help you evaluate whether you have what it takes to build your own business. Just as important, it will help you determine whether you really want to. You may fantasize about greeting customers in your own store or selling your hand-knit sweaters over the Internet, but after some exploration, you might discover that when it comes to the demands of minding a store, you would actually prefer to work a nine-to-five day and let someone else deal with the headaches of employees, leases, taxes, and contracts. Then again, you might decide that you are ready to take the leap.

So, let's take that long, hard look in the mirror, shall we?

The Good, Bad, and Unexpected Delights of Running the Show

We should point out at the start that nothing in business (like life) stays the same. Some days are good, some days are bad, and some unexpectedly profitable, but tomorrow will always be different. While the basic joys of running the show stay the same, there are some days when you just need to remind yourself why you decided to start your own business.

The Good: What We Like About Running the Show

We think there are more good than bad things about starting a business. Adrienne Arieff, founder of Arieff Communications, a public relations business in San Francisco specializing in hotels and beauty products, offers this benefit to consider: "The good thing about running your own business is that the final decision is always yours to make."

These are some other benefits to running the show.

You are never bored. Those days of sitting at your desk, staring out the window fantasizing about running off with Russell Crowe are over. You now have work to do and the motivation to do it.

You will constantly be challenged. Let's say that you have a slow day (rare, we hope) and thoughts of Russell Crowe creep in; within the next minute or so, you will have an opportunity to create, execute, and manage something. It could be anything from working on a new window display to being interviewed about your business for an article in the local newspaper.

Your time is your own. It now benefits you, not someone else, to work harder and longer if need be. But, if you have a doctor's appointment and are running a little late, that's fine, because now you have the most understanding boss in the world ... YOU.

You have the opportunity to create an ideal work environment. You can now create the work environment you have always been looking for in past jobs. Let's say you work best listening to a little Grateful Dead; you can do it, if you don't run a children's clothing store. Or, you prefer to start your day late and work until the wee hours. You can do it, if your business lends itself to those hours. Your company can be structured in ways that work best for you.

You don't have to ever again beg for a promotion or a raise from a boss. Okay, so you might have to ask for a fee increase from a client, but that is easier than begging for a salary bump from a supervisor who was passed out drunk at last year's holiday party. Need more money? With some careful planning and hard work, you can make it happen.

You can make your work fit your life. For too long you have been squeezing in dates, doctor appointments, birthday celebrations, and your child's school play around your workday. Now you have the opportunity to create a career that fits your life. This isn't to say that you will work less (you will most likely be working more), but the timing of it is now up to you, and if getting to your child's play means locking up the office for an hour or two, so be it.

You don't have a boss. We can't stress enough how GOOD this is. It is fantastic not to have anyone to answer to other than yourself (and sometimes investors, but we will get to that later). You now call the shots, set the agenda, make the schedule, hire and fire, reap the benefits and the profits of a successful endeavor. Nothing is better than that.

The Bad: What We Don't Like About Running the Show

It is important to remember that BAD should be temporary. If most of your day is spent worrying, stressing, obsessing, crying, or any ing's other than smiling and laughing, then think about doing something else. Do expect some bad days, weeks, and months. As Adrienne Arieff says, "The fragility of not knowing if the clients will be around month-to-month is tough."

You will feel out of sync with the rest of the world. Your work life is now completely unique to you. This will make you feel out of sync with the rest of the working world. While everyone you know works a nine-to-five job, has two weeks of vacation a year, and has a corporate 401(k) plan, you most likely won't. Occasionally this is a lonely feeling. If you experience this too often, we suggest that you join an organization for entrepreneurs; the National Association of Women Business Owners is a great place to start. Other entrepreneurs are the only ones who can relate to the challenges facing you on a daily basis ...

The Girl's Guide to Starting Your Own Business
Candid Advice, Frank Talk, and True Stories for the Successful Entrepreneur
. Copyright © by Caitlin Friedman. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

What People are Saying About This

Barbara Corcoran
This fun and informative book shows aspiring young women how to build their own businesses from the ground up . . .
— (Barbara Corcoran, author of If You Don't Have Big Breasts, Put Ribbons on Your Pigtails)
Ella Brennan
Ella Brennan, owner, Commander's Palace
This book will do for business what Joy of Cooking did for the culinary world . . ."

Meet the Author

Caitlin Friedman, a cofounder of the boutique public relations agency YC Media, is a full-time writer and consultant. Kimberly Yorio is the president of YC Media, specializing in publicity for cookbooks, restaurants, wine and spirits, and food products. They've written four books together, including The Girl's Guide to Being a Boss; The Girl's Guide to Big Bold Career Success; and Happy at Work, Happy at Home.

Caitlin Friedman, a cofounder of the boutique public relations agency YC Media, is a full-time writer and consultant. Kimberly Yorio is the president of YC Media, specializing in publicity for cookbooks, restaurants, wine and spirits, and food products. They've written four books together, including The Girl's Guide to Being a Boss; The Girl's Guide to Big Bold Career Success; and Happy at Work, Happy at Home.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Girl's Guide to Starting Your Own Business 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was a great help in starting my own business! It explains everything from writing a press release to hiring your first employee. I completely recomend this book, it's very easy to read - not stiff and boring! And it's very practical, after all these two women started their own business!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was inspirational, informative, specific, practical, and fun to read. I highly recommend it! I took it everywhere and literally could not put it down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great tone - helpful, clear, inspiring and realistic. Delivers what you need to do to start a business in the order you need to do it. Practical advise mixed with moxie. Recommended!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago