Girls in Tears [NOOK Book]

Overview

In the final volume of the fresh and funny Girls Quartet, Ellie’s best friends do the unthinkable—bond without her—until the girls realize how to really be friends.

Ellie knows the rule: Best friends always come before boys. But Russell isn’t just any old boy. He and Ellie are in love. They’re going to go out forever and ever . . . at least, that’s what she thinks until everything goes wrong. Now Ellie feels like crying all the time and—to ...
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Girls in Tears

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Overview

In the final volume of the fresh and funny Girls Quartet, Ellie’s best friends do the unthinkable—bond without her—until the girls realize how to really be friends.

Ellie knows the rule: Best friends always come before boys. But Russell isn’t just any old boy. He and Ellie are in love. They’re going to go out forever and ever . . . at least, that’s what she thinks until everything goes wrong. Now Ellie feels like crying all the time and—to make matters worse—she can’t even count on Magda and Nadine anymore! The three of them were supposed to be inseparable. They couldn’t really be splitting up for good. Could they?

From the Paperback edition.

In the midst of trouble at home, with her best friends, and with her love life, thirteen-year-old Ellie receives an encouraging letter from her favorite illustrator.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
The fourth episode of Jacqueline Wilson's popular Girls quartet reaches a turbulent and friendship-affirming conclusion, with Ellie dating a new beau and her pals being put to the test.

Ellie's going ga-ga over boyfriend Russell, especially since he's given her a ring to wear and is constantly whispering sweet nothings in her ear. But when Magda and Nadine start keeping secrets and Russell enters an art competition with a drawing that looks like one of her creations, Ellie starts feeling like a lone wolf. Unfortunately, things get even chillier when Ellie spots Magda and Russell "snogging" at a party, and she winds up ditching them all for good -- that is, until Magda talks her into rescuing Nadine from a potentially dangerous date.

Will Ellie ever forgive Russell and Magda? Can her friendship with her two best friends ever be the same? Through Ellie's tears of sadness and joy, this winner of England's Children's Book of the Year Award is a page-turner that reveals why "girls cry when they quarrel with their friends" and why they "cry when everything ends happily ever after." A fast-paced read that fans of the first three books won't want to miss. Shana Taylor

Publishers Weekly
From teary-eyed teens to outer-space travelers, favorite characters return in new series installments. Girls in Tears wraps up Jacqueline Wilson's Girls quartet, continuing the story of Ellie and her best friends, Nadine and Magda. This time, Ellie's infatuation with Russell threatens the trio's unbreakable bond, as the author delivers a message about friendship and first love in an easygoing, humorous tale filled with British slang. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
KLIATT
This is the final book in a popular British series, following Girls in Love, Girls Under Pressure, and Girls Out Late, complete with British humor and slang. Three girls—Ellie, Magda and Nadine—are best friends. With a threesome, there are often trials testing the friendships. Also, they are barely beginning adolescence and have enough angst to cover the usual complaints at this age. They fall to the temptations of males all around them, and they are in constant battle with their parents. At one party, they get seriously drunk, and Ellie's boyfriend hooks up with Magda. Will the friendship survive this indiscretion? Nadine has a relationship with someone she met over the Internet and meets up with him in London, only to discover he isn't exactly who he said he would be. Luckily for her, her friends follow her and help her out of a potentially dangerous situation. If you have fans of the series then go ahead and purchase it. (The Girls Quartet, Book 4). KLIATT Codes: JS—Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2002, Random House, 169p., Ages 12 to 18.
—Sherri Ginsberg
School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-This fourth book in the series furthers the trials and tribulations of best friends Ellie, Magda, and Nadine. Ellie experiences many ups and downs (mainly downs) as she grapples with the shaky relationships all around her. Her dad and stepmom are continuously fighting, her little brother's hopelessly annoying, and her friends seem to be excluding her. Her "perfect" boyfriend proves not so perfect as he plagiarizes her beloved cartoon character for a drawing contest, and when all of the friends get drunk at a party, he ends up making out with Magda. The teen has to come to the realization that her forever friends and forever boyfriend may not actually be forever. This is a quick, enjoyable read, complete with British vernacular and humor. It will appeal to many girls facing relationship issues.-Michele Shaw, Yorkshire Academy, Houston, TX Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
“Jacqueline Wilson pulls off the rare feat of dramatizing a serious issue with a light touch.” — Daily Telegraph
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307433459
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 12/18/2007
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 1,150,387
  • Age range: 12 years
  • File size: 269 KB

Meet the Author

Jacqueline Wilson has won many awards for her children’s books including the Guardian Children’s Fiction Award, the Children’s Book Award and the Smarties Prize. The Illustrated Mum was chosen as British Children’s Book of the Year in 1999.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

girls cry when they’re happy

You’ll never ever guess what! I’m so happy happy happy. I want to laugh, sing, shout, even have a little cry. I can’t wait to tell Magda and Nadine.

I go down to breakfast and sip coffee and nibble dry toast, my hand carefully displayed beside my plate.

I wait for someone to notice. I smile blithely at my dad and my stepmum, Anna, over breakfast. I even smile at my little brother, Eggs, though he has a cold and deeply unattractive green slime is dribbling out of his nostrils.

“Why are you grinning at me like that, Ellie?” Eggs asks me thickly, chomping very strawberry-jammy toast. We’ve run out of butter, so Anna’s let him have double jam instead. “Stop looking at me.”

“I don’t want to look at you, little Runny Nose. You are not a pretty sight.”

“I don’t want to be pretty,” says Eggs, sniffing so snortily that we all protest.

“For goodness’ sake, son, you’re putting me right off my breakfast,” Dad says, swatting at Eggs with his Guardian.

“Get a tissue, Eggs,” says Anna, sketching maniacally on a pad.

OK, maybe it’s too much to expect Dad and Eggs to notice but I was sure Anna would spot it straight away.

“There aren’t any tissues,” Eggs says triumphantly, breathing in and out to make his nose bubble.

“Oh God, no, that’s right. I didn’t get to Waitrose yesterday,” says Anna. “OK, Eggs, use loo-roll instead.”

“I haven’t got any,” says Eggs, looking round as if he expects Andrex puppies to trot right into our kitchen trailing toilet paper like in the adverts. “What’s that you’re drawing, Mum? Is it a rabbit? Let’s look.”

He pulls at Anna’s paper. Anna hangs on. The paper tears in two.

“Oh, for God’s sake, Eggs, I’ve been working on that wretched bunnies-in-bed design since six this morning!” Anna shouts. “Now go to the loo and get some paper and blow your nose this instant. I am sick of you, do you hear me?”

Eggs sniffs, startled. He gets down from the table and backs away worriedly. He’s still holding half the piece of paper. He drops it guiltily and rushes to the door, his mouth wobbling. We hear him crying in the hall.

“He’s crying, Anna,” says Dad.

“I know,” says Anna, starting to sketch on a new piece of paper.

“What’s the matter with you? Why be so snappy with him? He only wanted to look,” says Dad, folding up his newspaper. He stands, looking martyred. “I’m going to comfort poor little Eggs.”

“Yes, you do that,” says Anna through gritted teeth. “He is actually your son too, though when he woke five times in the night with his stuffed-up nose I seem to remember you remained happily snoring.”

“No wonder his nose is stuffed up if the poor little kid can’t blow it. Why on earth have we run out of everything like tissues and butter? I would have thought they were basic domestic necessities.”

“Yes, they are,” says Anna, still drawing—but her hand is trembling. “And they generally appear as if by magic in this house because one of us slogs off to the supermarket every week.”

I can’t stand this. My happy bubble is on the brink of bursting. My magic hand clenches. What’s the matter with Dad and Anna and Eggs? Why won’t they lighten up? Why can’t Dad offer to do the weekly shop? Why can’t Anna watch her tongue? Why can’t Eggs blow his sniffly little nose? Why does it all have to turn into a stupid scene with Dad shouting, Anna near tears, Eggs already howling?

I’m the teenager. I’m the one who should be shouting and shrieking all over the place. Yet look at me! I’m little Ellie Ever-so-Effervescent because—oh, because because because!

I stretch out my hand, fingers extended, in a totally obvious gesture. Anna looks up. She looks at me. She looks at my hand. But her blue eyes are blank. She can only see her boring bedtime bunnies.

I grab my rucksack and say goodbye to Anna and Dad. They hardly notice me. I find Eggs drooping in the downstairs toilet and give him a quick hug. Big mistake. He leaves a little slime trail on my school blazer where he has snuffled his nose. Then he looks up at me.

“Why are you being nice to me, Ellie?” he asks suspiciously.

It’s a waste of time acting Miss Sweetness and Light in my family. I might just as well be mean and moody. “OK, when I come back home I’ll be very very nasty,” I hiss at Eggs, baring my teeth and making strangling movements with my hands.

He giggles nervously, not quite sure whether I’m joking. I reach out to ruffle his hair but he ducks. I smile at him and rush off, not wanting to listen to the row in the kitchen a second longer.

Dad and Anna have started to act almost as if they hate each other. It’s getting a bit scary. It’s weird to think that when Dad first married Anna I couldn’t stand her. I’d have given anything to break them up. I thought Anna was all that’s awful. I was just a little kid. I wasn’t ready to be fair. I hated her simply because I felt she was trying to take my mum’s place.

Mum died when I was little. I still think about her every day. Not all the time—just in little wistful moments. I like to talk to her inside my head and she talks back to me. I know it’s just me, of course. But it’s still a comfort.

I used to think that every time I went on a shopping trip with Anna or curled up on a sofa with her to watch Friends I was being grossly mean and disloyal to Mum. It made me feel so bad. Then I’d turn on Anna and make her feel bad too. But now I can see how skewed that sort of thinking is. I can like Anna lots and still love my mum. Simple.

After all, I’ve had two best friends forever and a day and I don’t fuss whether I like Nadine or Magda best. I like them both and they like me and I can’t wait to show them!

From the Hardcover edition.

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Table of Contents

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First Chapter

girls cry when they're happy

You'll never ever guess what! I'm so happy happy happy. I want to laugh, sing, shout, even have a little cry. I can't wait to tell Magda and Nadine.

I go down to breakfast and sip coffee and nibble dry toast, my hand carefully displayed beside my plate.

I wait for someone to notice. I smile blithely at my dad and my stepmum, Anna, over breakfast. I even smile at my little brother, Eggs, though he has a cold and deeply unattractive green slime is dribbling out of his nostrils.

"Why are you grinning at me like that, Ellie?" Eggs asks me thickly, chomping very strawberry-jammy toast. We've run out of butter, so Anna's let him have double jam instead. "Stop looking at me."

"I don't want to look at you, little Runny Nose. You are not a pretty sight."

"I don't want to be pretty," says Eggs, sniffing so snortily that we all protest.

"For goodness' sake, son, you're putting me right off my breakfast," Dad says, swatting at Eggs with his Guardian.

"Get a tissue, Eggs," says Anna, sketching maniacally on a pad.

OK, maybe it's too much to expect Dad and Eggs to notice but I was sure Anna would spot it straight away.

"There aren't any tissues," Eggs says triumphantly, breathing in and out to make his nose bubble.

"Oh God, no, that's right. I didn't get to Waitrose yesterday," says Anna. "OK, Eggs, use loo-roll instead."

"I haven't got any," says Eggs, looking round as if he expects Andrex puppies to trot right into our kitchen trailing toilet paper like in the adverts. "What's that you're drawing, Mum? Is it a rabbit? Let's look."

He pulls at Anna's paper.Anna hangs on. The paper tears in two.

"Oh, for God's sake, Eggs, I've been working on that wretched bunnies-in-bed design since six this morning!" Anna shouts. "Now go to the loo and get some paper and blow your nose this instant. I am sick of you, do you hear me?"

Eggs sniffs, startled. He gets down from the table and backs away worriedly. He's still holding half the piece of paper. He drops it guiltily and rushes to the door, his mouth wobbling. We hear him crying in the hall.

"He's crying, Anna," says Dad.

"I know," says Anna, starting to sketch on a new piece of paper.

"What's the matter with you? Why be so snappy with him? He only wanted to look," says Dad, folding up his newspaper. He stands, looking martyred. "I'm going to comfort poor little Eggs."

"Yes, you do that," says Anna through gritted teeth. "He is actually your son too, though when he woke five times in the night with his stuffed-up nose I seem to remember you remained happily snoring."

"No wonder his nose is stuffed up if the poor little kid can't blow it. Why on earth have we run out of everything like tissues and butter? I would have thought they were basic domestic necessities."

"Yes, they are," says Anna, still drawing—but her hand is trembling. "And they generally appear as if by magic in this house because one of us slogs off to the supermarket every week."

I can't stand this. My happy bubble is on the brink of bursting. My magic hand clenches. What's the matter with Dad and Anna and Eggs? Why won't they lighten up? Why can't Dad offer to do the weekly shop? Why can't Anna watch her tongue? Why can't Eggs blow his sniffly little nose? Why does it all have to turn into a stupid scene with Dad shouting, Anna near tears, Eggs already howling?

I'm the teenager. I'm the one who should be shouting and shrieking all over the place. Yet look at me! I'm little Ellie Ever-so-Effervescent because—oh, because because because!

I stretch out my hand, fingers extended, in a totally obvious gesture. Anna looks up. She looks at me. She looks at my hand. But her blue eyes are blank. She can only see her boring bedtime bunnies.

I grab my rucksack and say goodbye to Anna and Dad. They hardly notice me. I find Eggs drooping in the downstairs toilet and give him a quick hug. Big mistake. He leaves a little slime trail on my school blazer where he has snuffled his nose. Then he looks up at me.

"Why are you being nice to me, Ellie?" he asks suspiciously.

It's a waste of time acting Miss Sweetness and Light in my family. I might just as well be mean and moody. "OK, when I come back home I'll be very very nasty," I hiss at Eggs, baring my teeth and making strangling movements with my hands.

He giggles nervously, not quite sure whether I'm joking. I reach out to ruffle his hair but he ducks. I smile at him and rush off, not wanting to listen to the row in the kitchen a second longer.

Dad and Anna have started to act almost as if they hate each other. It's getting a bit scary. It's weird to think that when Dad first married Anna I couldn't stand her. I'd have given anything to break them up. I thought Anna was all that's awful. I was just a little kid. I wasn't ready to be fair. I hated her simply because I felt she was trying to take my mum's place.

Mum died when I was little. I still think about her every day. Not all the time—just in little wistful moments. I like to talk to her inside my head and she talks back to me. I know it's just me, of course. But it's still a comfort.

I used to think that every time I went on a shopping trip with Anna or curled up on a sofa with her to watch Friends I was being grossly mean and disloyal to Mum. It made me feel so bad. Then I'd turn on Anna and make her feel bad too. But now I can see how skewed that sort of thinking is. I can like Anna lots and still love my mum. Simple.

After all, I've had two best friends forever and a day and I don't fuss whether I like Nadine or Magda best. I like them both and they like me and I can't wait to show them!
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 14 )
Rating Distribution

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(8)

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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2014

    U shall read thy book

    This book is a good book and it is verry decriptive in many diflerent ways.
    Although it reminded me of my relationship and my last breakup.
    Other ohen that i thought that this book was wonderful and i can read it over and over again if i realy wanted to.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 12, 2011

    READ IT!

    When I first started reading this book it pulled me in from the first page. I love the series too. I¿m on the 2nd book. It gives a girl a feeling of what she might go through from peer-pressure to the way she looks. But Ellie¿s friends Magda and Nadine are there through everything, along with her boyfriend Russell.
    This book takes place in London in a small town. In Ellie¿s house mostly with her father, Anna (her stepmom), Eggs her little brother. Along with her best friends Magda and Nadine, they are with her through her crazy break up with Russell (her boyfriend). Ellie has a problem letting go of her mother who is dead. Along with her pursuing her life dream of being an artist. Russell doesn¿t want Ellie to be more successful than him so he doesn¿t support her.
    This book was the best book I¿ve read in a long time. It helped me realize things I never would have. Ellie is an inspiration. It is a sappy, girly, saucy book. My favorite part was when Ellie and Russell went to a party and Russell started to be mean and take advantage of Ellie. Then Ellie tried alcohol for the first time and got drunk. But then come Magda and Nadine to the rescue and helped her to the loo and to bed. But when she wakes up she stumbles down stairs and soon finds Magda and Russell on the stairs snogging.
    This book is a very girly book. I wouldn¿t recommend it to any boys.
    I give these book 4 stars because it meant so much to me. It was a good really sad book even though sometimes it give a little too must detail.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Girls in Tears...you'll cry, you'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll love it!

    Girls in Tears gives us a final glimpse into Ellie's life as she deals with friends, her family, and her boyfriend Russell. Again, Jacqueline perfectly illustrates the trials, tribulations and joys of being a teen girl.

    I did have an issue with how Russell and even her friends treated her but I guess her conflicts with them helped the story along. Another amazing read especially for teen girls!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2006

    lov this book

    I love this book and really any other book Jacqueline Wilson writes. I've read them all and I love the way they talk too and what they call things like nail polish in Texas is nail varnish there. So read this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2006

    Sad

    This book was well written and realtes to many teenage girls but, it's a bit..........depressing. It's realistic and all but I wish'd Jaqueline had chosen a differen't story to end the quartet. But the ending is romantically and or emotionally satisfying.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2004

    Read This!

    When I finished this lovely book, I was in tears like the name of the book because Ellie¿s experiences are nearly like my experiences especially problems about friends, boyfriend and family. I really saw the pictures of teenagers¿ life. I could feel as same as Ellie felt. I was happy when she was and I was in sorrow when she cried with sadness. I think the author can present the real teenagers¿ natures. In addition, she still maintained her attractive style of writing her books. I like the way that she began in each chapter with ¿Girls cry when¿¿ because it relates with the name of the book. Everyone who likes Jacqueline Wilson¿s books should not miss `Girls in Tears¿, so ¿READ IT!¿ :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2004

    I'm in Tears :'(

    When I finished this lovely book, I was in tears like the name of the book because Ellie¿s experiences are nearly like my experiences especially friends and family. I could feel as same as Ellie felt. I was happy when she was and I was in sorrow when she cried. This book can present about teenagers¿ life. I think Jacqueline Wilson has good understanding about teenagers¿ natures. In addition, she still maintained her attractive style of writing her books. I like the way that she began in each chapter with ¿Girls cry when¿¿ because it relates with the name of the book. Everyone who likes Jacqueline Wilson¿s books should not miss `Girls in Tears¿, so ¿READ IT!¿ :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2004

    WOW!!!!

    another great book... with russel and ellie and magda.. nadine even gets a new guy this book was great although magda wasn't very nice in this book you will have to read it to find out what i mean

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2003

    Wonderful Book E-mail me back plz (BundieBabee05@aol.com)

    Hello Ok I LOVE THESE BOOKS THEY ARE THE BEST. These are the kind of books that I love to read lol and it's basically the only time i really get into books lol. Anyways I really hope another one comes out because i didnt really care for the ending lol i want to know what happens it just stops SO please if anyone knows cause you email me back and tell me if there is going to be another or more books coming out for this series. thanks much my e-mail is up there. Anyways Thanks for your time I hope to hear from someone soon Bye Bye

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2003

    Wow!

    I can't believe this! Magda is such a you-know-what! How could she do that to Ellie? And Russell? I read the previous book and thought he was such a sweetheart! I'm getting this book tomorrow to find out what happens.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2003

    Jacqueline Wilson has done it again!

    Ellie,of course, has a lot of problems in her life, again. Nadine and Magda, her best friends, Russell, her boyfriend, Anna and her dad and Eggs, her family, are all part of them. Some parts of this book are unpredictable. You'll get excited and shocked!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2003

    Girls in Tears

    Sounds good and it is going to be a lot of trouble .

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2003

    Looks like more trouble...

    I've read all three of the previous books. Magda, Nadine, and Ellie seem to get into a lot of trouble that they could easily avoid. From the new title I can tell that there will be more trouble in this book. I recommend getting this one if you've read the others.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews

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