The Girls of Summer: The U. S. Women's Soccer Team and How It Changed the World

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Overview

Now with a new afterword, The Girls of Summer, takes a serious, compelling look at the women who won the 1999 World Cup and brings to life the skills and victories of the American team. Longman explores the issues this unprecedented achievement has raised: the importance of the players as role models; the significance of race and class; the sexualization of the team members; and the differences between men and women's sports.
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The Girls Of Summer

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Overview

Now with a new afterword, The Girls of Summer, takes a serious, compelling look at the women who won the 1999 World Cup and brings to life the skills and victories of the American team. Longman explores the issues this unprecedented achievement has raised: the importance of the players as role models; the significance of race and class; the sexualization of the team members; and the differences between men and women's sports.
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Editorial Reviews

Boston Globe
More than a sports book... Longman tackles complex and controversial issues like race and sex and gender politics on a global scale.
Sports Illustrated
Fascinating.... With enough new behind-the-scenes reporting to satisfy even the most inveterate soccer fan,.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780756762117
  • Publisher: DIANE Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 11/1/2000
  • Pages: 318

Read an Excerpt

Afterword

A League of Their Own

ARE YOU BRANDI CHASTAIN?"

"No, she's the naked one."

But you're somebody, aren't you?"

The woman in the restaurant filed through her mental Rolodex.

"I've seen you somewhere. A Denny's ad?"

"Dunkin' Donuts."

"Right, so you're . . . "Julie Foudy."

"I knew you were somebody."

A year and a half after the Women's World Cup, the flame of recognitionstill kindled with the public. It was now possible to see Foudy's face,like a wanted poster for calorie felons, in the window of donut shops upand down the East Coast. An athletic windfall had dovetailed with thecommercial one. Beginning in April of 2001, a professional soccer leaguefor women would begin play in eight cities, around the country. Withopening day only four months away, Foudy and her teammates had gatheredin Boca Raton, Florida, for the inaugural draft of the Women's UnitedSoccer Association (WUSA).

The American World Cup and. Olympic stars previously had been assignedin groups of threes to their respective teams. Stars from Brazil, Norwayand Germany had also been allotted in pairs. Still, the draft held muchintrigue. After earlier reluctance, China had recently made five of itsplayers available, including Sun Wen, the most valuable player in the1999 Women's World Cup. Another 200 of the top female players in Americahad also come to Boca Raton for a tryout camp, hoping, to be drafted.Among them was Trudi Sharpsteen of Hermosa Beach, California. She hadbeen in the pool of players considered for the women's national team in1986-87, and was one of the pioneers of the sport. Unlike Foudy, andChastain,however, her career had played out in the anonymity of semiproball. But now, at age 36, Sharpsteen had taken a leave of absence fromher job in the health care industry. Her sport had finally achieved thelegitimacy of a professional league, and she would make one finalattempt to ride the cresting wave of popularity.

"I'm so happy this is happening during my playing career," Foudy said,sitting in a hotel restaurant two days before the draft. "Seeing friendsof mine that I grew up playing against getting a second chance isawesome. I played with Trudi. How cool is this? She probably dreamed ofthis her whole life. She went through some of the same things we wentthrough, and here she is out here. Now she's getting a chance."

Christmas was approaching, but the notion of wintry cheer seemed surrealin South Florida with its sweltering Santas and inflatable snowmen.Once, it had seemed equally implausible that a women's professionalsoccer league would have a chance to succeed in the United States. Evennow, with the Women's World Cup used as a sort of champagne bottle tochristen the launch of the WUSA, many wondered whether the league wouldbe seaworthy. There would be little room for error. Even the most fervidsupporters of the women's game agreed that there would be no secondchance.

As with any start-up, league officials faced opening day with a mix ofanticipation and apprehension. There were no souvenir jerseys in thestores for Christmas; no apparel company willing to match supplies ofuniforms with supplies of cash for sponsorship deals; no permanent CEO,league president or commissioner; no buzz from an American gold medal atthe 2000 Sydney Olympics. Apparently tired after a long, grindingschedule of international travel, the United States played erraticallyduring the Summer Games. Coach April Heinrichs substituted infrequentlyand some believed that her 4-4-2 system was not optimally suited to theAmerican team, marginalizing Kristine Lilly on the wing in midfield andminimizing the chance that, had she been healthy, Michelle Akers wouldhave returned to the lineup. Still, Mia Hamm asserted herself with atimely goal in the semifinals against Brazil and then made a brilliantrescuing pass to Tiffeny Milbrett at the end of regulation in thegold-medal game against Norway. The Americans lost in overtime, however,and in their stunning, gracious defeat there was the sense that apioneering era was coming to an end. Akers announced her retirement fromthe national team before the Olympics, and Carla Overbeck, theindispensable captain, followed before Christmas. "I wanted so badly todo it for this group," Foudy had said after the Norway match. "It'spossibly our last time together. It's irreplaceable, this bond."

Two months later, excruciating defeat had been tempered by theexpectancy of a professional league that would extend the careers ofveteran players and serve to develop younger players for the nationalteam. Still, much work remained. One coach was yet to be namedofficially, and two teams were without finalized stadium contracts. Onlytwo corporate sponsors had been signed instead of the desired eight toten. The league's marketing department had limited experience involvingteam sports. Before a single game was played, one of the franchises hadbeen moved from Orlando, Florida, to Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Theteam, known as the Tempest, was considering a name change, to theCourage, not wanting to be known in the inevitable shorthand ofnewspaper headlines as the 'Pests. Akers, voted the top female player ofthe century, had announced she wouldn't play the first season. And JoyFawcett, the reliable defender, was expecting her third child, which ledher San Diego team to request what was surely a first in professionalsports — pregnancy compensation picks in the WUSA draft.

Despite inescapable growing pains, the WUSA moved confidently towardopening day with its eight teams: the Atlanta Beat, Bay Area CyberRays,Boston Breakers, Carolina Courarage, New York Power, PhiladelphiaCharge, San Diego Spirit and Washington Freedom. There was reason to besanguine. Unlike Major League Soccer, the American men's professionalleague, the WUSA had signed virtually all the top female players in theworld...

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Table of Contents

1 The List 1
2 "I Will Have Two Fillings" 12
3 Babe City 27
4 "I'm Expecting Great Things from You" 48
5 Savages and Blunt Instruments 57
6 The Great Wall of China 74
7 Green Eggs and Hamm 91
8 The Burden of Expectations 107
9 And the Captains Shall Lead Them 129
10 "She Is Our Everything" 148
11 "Coach Us Like Men, Treat Us Like Women" 168
12 "My Team Needs Me" 189
13 The Most Underrated Player in the World 205
14 "Hollywood" Confidential 215
15 The Jell-O Wobble of Exhaustion 227
16 Fly in the Milk 246
17 A Moment of Temporary Insanity 262
18 "We Did It for Each Other" 283
Afterword: A League of Their Own 308
Sources 322
Bibliography 325
Acknowledgments 326
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2013

    Bye it

    Im 13 and you need to be a soccer player to understand what it means you need to lear from them and try to understand why they did that and u must LOVE SOCCER like i do ive played for 9 years and now without me on mt team they would be last not second place

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2012

    Dont buy it!

    This book had good information but it was very confusing and jumbled up. It made it very hard to understand abd hard to read!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2012

    No one

    No one has written a review yet so i wanted to i havent read the book though it looks goodish

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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