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Giving Kids The Business

Overview


The commercialization of public education is upon us. With much fanfare and plenty of controversy, plans to cash in on our public schools are popping up all over the country. Educator and award-winning commentator Alex Molnar has written the first book to both document the commercial invasion of public education and explain its alarming consequences. Giving Kids the Business explains why hot-button proposals like for-profit public schools run by companies such as the Edison Project and Education Alternatives, ...
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Overview


The commercialization of public education is upon us. With much fanfare and plenty of controversy, plans to cash in on our public schools are popping up all over the country. Educator and award-winning commentator Alex Molnar has written the first book to both document the commercial invasion of public education and explain its alarming consequences. Giving Kids the Business explains why hot-button proposals like for-profit public schools run by companies such as the Edison Project and Education Alternatives, Inc.; taxpayer-financed vouchers for private schools; market-driven charter schools; Channel One, an advertising-riddled television program for schools; and the relentless interference of corporations in the school curriculum spell trouble for America’s children.Imagine that the tobacco industry may be helping to shape what your son and daughter learn about smoking. Imagine that your son is given a Gushers fruit snack, told to burst it between his teeth, and asked by his teacher to compare the sensation to a geothermal eruption (compliments of General Mills). Imagine your daughter is taught a lesson about self-esteem by being asked to think about "good hair days" and "bad hair days" (compliments of Revlon). Imagine that to cap off a day of world-class learning, your child's teacher shows a videotape explaining that the Valdez oil spill wasn't so bad after all (compliments of Exxon).Anyone interested in how schools are being turned into marketing vehicles, how education is being recast as a commercial transaction, and how children are being cultivated as a cash crop will want to read Giving Kids the Business.
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Editorial Reviews

Jonathan Kozol
At last! ...We have needed a book like this for a long time. Everyone who values public education will be grateful.
Michael Jacobson
Molnar's splendid book blows the whistle on the commercialization of schools and students.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780813391397
  • Publisher: Westview Press
  • Publication date: 9/1/2001
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author


Alex Molnar is considered one of the nation's leading experts on the commercialization of public education, market-orietnted school reforms such as private school vouchers, for-profit schools, and charter schools. His views have been widely reported in newspaper and magazine articles, and he has been a frequent guest on radio and television programs. Molnar is professor and director of the Education Policy Studies Laboratory in the College of Education at Arizona State University at Tempe.
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Table of Contents



Acknowledgements
Marching As If to War
Stalking the Elusive Skills Storage
Corporate Schizophrenia
Button-Down Revolutionaries
Wisconsin Turns Right and Becomes a National Model
Children as a Cash Crop
The Shape of Things to Come
And Now a Word from Our Sponsor
Apples and Other Temptations
Harnessing Peer Pressure
Seal of Community Approval
Well-Targeted Learning
Good Cop/Bad Cop
How Junior Has Grown
Learning Can Be Sweet... or Salty
A Captive Market
Decades of Battle
The Crowded Classroom
Pizza and Other Educational Values
Keep Drugs in School
A Pattern of Abuse
The Critics Take a Powder
Seizing the Moment
High-Tech Hucksters Go to School
Connections Plugs In
Principles, Even Abstract Ones, Die Hard
Sanitizing the Shill
Tax Assessors Get an Education
Shut Out in New York
Open Warfare in California
Advertisers Sold Power over Students
The Hidden Persuaders
Behind the Educational Facade
Class in the Classroom
The Expensive Education of Mr. Whittle
The Low Life of High Tech
Schools for Profit: Follow the Yellow Brick Road
Same Old Tune, Same Old Criticism
The Mythical Crisis
The Master Myth
Enter the Traveling Salesmen
Fist Take Twelve Minutes, Then the Whole School
Dark Days for Edison
EAI—Founded on Fantasy
Privatization Works Its Wonders
Trouble in the Classroom
Born-Again Savior
Reaping Education's Nonexistent Financial Bounty
Private School Vouchers: A False Choice
We've Been There
The Other Choice— Public School Choice
The Milwaukee VoucherExperiment— Success Without Results
An Unpopular Reform
The Apparatus of the Right
Business Unlocks the Door
Confusion on the Left
The Market Myth
Separate and Unequal
Old-Time Religion
Reform Without Content
Charter Schools: The Smiling Face of Disinvestment
Prairie Fire Reform
A Curriculum-Free Franchise
An Attempted Evaluation
Real World Problems
Watching the Money
The Demonizing of Teachers
Edventures in Exploitation
Storefront Education
The Public Debate and the Real One
What the Market Can't Provide
A Reform that Works
The Hidden Agenda
The Experience with Privatization
The High Cost of the Free Market
The New Separatism
A Natural Self-Interest
The Deteriorating Physical and Economic Infrastructure
The Real Bottom Line
Appendix
Notes
About the Book and Author
Index
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