Glaciers: Nature's icy Caps

Glaciers: Nature's icy Caps

by David L. Harrison, Cheryl Nathan
     
 

The seventh book in the Earthworks series offers a fascinating introduction to icy caps that have changed the face of our planet. Glaciers are powerful forces of nature—tremendous sheets of ice that can weigh millions of tons, crush boulders, and flatten forests. Some slide down to meet the sea, break off, and form icebergs. Greenland, home to the largest

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Overview

The seventh book in the Earthworks series offers a fascinating introduction to icy caps that have changed the face of our planet. Glaciers are powerful forces of nature—tremendous sheets of ice that can weigh millions of tons, crush boulders, and flatten forests. Some slide down to meet the sea, break off, and form icebergs. Greenland, home to the largest glacier on earth, forms more than 40,000 icebergs each year, including the infamous one that sunk the Titanic. A lively look at one of the earth's remarkable phenomena.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This seven-hundred-word nonfiction book from the series "Earthworks" offers a ton of information about glaciers. The material holds specific details. However, it is simple enough for early readers and mid-graders to understand. The account begins with the sinking of the Titanic and goes on to talk about how glaciers are formed, what happens when they break, and a time frame of how long it takes some glaciers to develop. The oldest glacier, glaciers in Africa, and their thickness and weights, are some of the other topics. Readers gain understanding about how small changes in the earth's environment create big changes in living conditions. The book's multi-talented author holds a degree in science, and he offers extra titles in order for teachers and librarians to further pursue the subject. Computer-generated art has a mystic quality and dresses up the book. This is a great science supplement for teachers, as well as an overall good book kids will read again and again. This book makes it fun to learn about science. 2006, Boyds Mills Press, Ages 7 to 9.
—Nancy Garhan Attebury
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-This slim series entry takes a look at glaciers from the Ice Age to the Titanic disaster. Harrison includes facts on glacial formation, physical properties, and geological history. He has a poetic grasp of the kind of animated language that hooks young readers into nonfiction, yet his narrative is hindered by some inconsistencies and confusing usage. The pronunciation is given for the word "calving," but not for words like "Beringia" or "equator," and the author confusingly interchanges the terms iceberg and glacier. The discussion of Earth's warming trend and the melting glaciers makes it sound as though this is all part of a normal cycle. While the art technique is original, the illustrations are not always effective. The rendering of the Titanic hitting an iceberg works well in captivating children's attention, but the geological effects of melting glaciers are less clearly depicted. Source notes are not provided, and the author's note is geared toward older readers. There is a minimal section on further reading, but no glossary is offered to reinforce terms mentioned. Look to Roy A. Gallant's Glaciers (Watts, 1999), which has color photographs and a clearer text.-Michael Santangelo, Brooklyn Public Library, NY Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781590783726
Publisher:
Highlights Press
Publication date:
04/28/2006
Series:
Earth Works Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
6 - 8 Years

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