Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear (Matthew Hope Series #12)

Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear (Matthew Hope Series #12)

by Ed McBain
     
 

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What's cuddly, cute, and the object of a high-stakes court battle? It's Gladly, a cross-eyed teddy bear: the brainchild of slightly cross-eyed beauty Lainie Commins, Matthew Hope's client and the litigant in a trademark dispute with toy company tycoons Etta and Brett Toland. Hope, still recovering from a near-fatal shooting, is certain he can win this case - until…  See more details below

Overview

What's cuddly, cute, and the object of a high-stakes court battle? It's Gladly, a cross-eyed teddy bear: the brainchild of slightly cross-eyed beauty Lainie Commins, Matthew Hope's client and the litigant in a trademark dispute with toy company tycoons Etta and Brett Toland. Hope, still recovering from a near-fatal shooting, is certain he can win this case - until someone murders one of the key players. Suddenly Lainie is up for another trial, this time for homicide. While she vigorously denies any involvement in the shooting aboard the yacht Toy Boat, her story keeps changing, and the evidence against her mounts - until Hope discovers that Lainie is not only a toy designer with a complaint but also a participant in a most surprising sexual liaison.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Hero/narrator Matthew Hope, recovered from gunshots and a coma (There Was a Little Girl, 1994) and, true to his earlier resolve, practicing only civil law in (fictional) Calusa, Fla., represents the plaintiff in a suit involving the eponymous teddy bear, named after a mis-heard line in a hymn ("Gladly the cross I'd bear"). Young toy designer Lainie Commins is suing her ex-boss, toy manufacturer Brett Toland, for copyright and patent infringement, contending that his cross-eyed bear is a direct steal from hers. When Brett is found shot to death on his yacht, Lainie is arrested and charged with murder. She persuades Hope to represent her even as, we later learn, she commits the first legal sin, lying to her lawyer. From mansions to shacks and yacht club to sleazy venues for lingerie "models," McBain gives us a tour of Gulf Coast Florida that's seldom grand. Unable to reach his usual investigators (the main subplot has PI Warren Chambers urging his colleague Toots Kiley to kick her crack cocaine habit cold turkey), Hope hires 60-something Guthrie Lamb, an old-style PI with major male chauvinist traits. McBain, as he has for more than 40 years, keeps his readers riveted through this entire, satisfying tale. (Sept.)
Kirkus Reviews
Matthew Hope has sufficiently recovered from his near-fatal shooting (There Was a Little Girl, 1994, etc.) to take on a copyright-infringement case for Elaine Commins, who swears that Gladly, the cross-eyed bear she's designed for her brand-new firm, Just Kidding, wasn't developed while she was working for Brett and Etta Toland of Toyland. They say she's lying; she says they're lying. Despite some nifty drawings showing how Gladly's eyeglasses apparently cure her strabismus, the case would be pretty dull if Brett Toland didn't get himself fatally shot shortly after the defense closes. Against his own advice, Lainie demands that Hope defend her on the Murder One charge (four eyewitnesses place her on Brett's yacht shortly before the shooting), and it's off to the races for Hope and Guthrie Lamb—the new investigator he calls when Warren Chambers and Toots Kiley don't answer the phone because Warren's forcing handcuffed Toots to go cold turkey on a borrowed boat 30 miles offshore.

McBain plays out every sweet spin—Hope's client has more cover stories than Brigid O'Shaughnessy—with a master's effortless delight in his craft. Irresistible.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781477805756
Publisher:
Amazon Publishing
Publication date:
11/19/2013
Series:
Matthew Hope Series, #12
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.00(d)

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What People are saying about this

Elmore Leonard
McBain has a great approach, great attitude, terrific style, strong plot, excellent dialogue, sense of pace, and sense of reality.
Robert B. Parker
It is hard to think of anyone better at what he does -- in fact, it's impossible.

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