Glass House: Voices of the South

Overview

When Thea Tamborella returns to New Orleans after a ten-year absence, she finds a city gripped by fear. The privileged white socialites of her private-school days pack guns to fancy dinner parties and spend their free time in paramilitary patrols. The black gardeners, maids, and cooks who work days in the mansions of the elite Garden District return each evening to housing projects wracked by poverty, drugs, and gang violence. The city's haves and have-nots glare at each other across a yawning racial divide as ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$15.93
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$17.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $3.95   
  • New (3) from $13.73   
  • Used (5) from $3.95   
Sending request ...

Overview

When Thea Tamborella returns to New Orleans after a ten-year absence, she finds a city gripped by fear. The privileged white socialites of her private-school days pack guns to fancy dinner parties and spend their free time in paramilitary patrols. The black gardeners, maids, and cooks who work days in the mansions of the elite Garden District return each evening to housing projects wracked by poverty, drugs, and gang violence. The city's haves and have-nots glare at each other across a yawning racial divide as fear turns to hate and an us-against-them mentality.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Set in contemporary New Orleans, this is a compelling story about a young woman whose return to her hometown is undermined by old fears and new hatreds. Recovering from a failed marriage and haunted by the murder of her parents by two black men, Thea Tamborella moves back from New England into a mansion in the Garden District bequeathed to her by her aunt. Still at the mansion is Delzora Monroe, her aunt's housekeeper, whose son Burgess was Thea's childhood playmate until he was banished from the house. Now a rich and powerful drug dealer, Burgess is determined to rebuild the Convent Street Housing Project. Drawn to Burgess, Thea begins to understand the fear and distrust blacks feel in reaction to the white community's suspicion and prejudice. Racism lurks beneath the well-bred facades of Thea's old friends, her high school boyfriend Bobby Buchanan and well-to-do Sandy and Lyle Hindermann. Lyle has become a white supremacist fanatic and--when a white police officer is killed--a vigilante. The tensions between the two communities escalate beyond control until another fatality occurs. Shattered by the crossfire of raging hatred, Thea must come to terms with her parents' deaths, her conflicted feelings toward Burgess and her gradual recognition of the real enemy. This cautionary tale (which was inspired by real events) is a powerful, heartbreaking evocation of an American tragedy. Wiltz wrote The Killing Circle and other mysteries and was coauthor of Backlash: Race and the American Dream. (Jan.)
Library Journal
When Aunt Althea dies and leaves niece Thea Tamborella a mansion in the Garden District, Thea returns to New Orleans to settle the estate. Having lived in exile for ten years, she finds herself inexplicably drawn back to the city where life has become dangerous. Citizens are pitted against each other: black against white, rich against poor. Fear is pervasive. Despite the murder of her parents in her youth and the paranoia of some of her old friends, Thea remains open-minded. She hires Burgess Monroe, the son of her aunt's housekeeper, to remodel her house. A childhood acquaintance, Burgess has become a local drug kingpin and the Bishop of Convent Street. As the story unfolds, Thea finds herself physically drawn to Burgess. Wiltz writes beautifully and compellingly, creating the unique aura of New Orleans and a phalanx of well-developed characters. There is a sustained and effective atmosphere of racial tension throughout. Recommended.-- Kimberly G. Allen, MCI Corporate Info. Resources Ctr., Washington, D.C.
Kirkus Reviews
Wiltz's careers as mystery writer and TV documentarian influence this sociology-heavy novel, first published in 1994, which was inspired by the shooting of a New Orleans policeman in 1980, and its racially charged aftermath. A reluctant southerner, Wiltz's female protagonist returns to her native New Orleans when she inherits a family home. But the uneasily integrated city disturbs her greatly, and the liberal-minded woman finds herself mired in fear and tension. Kirkus found the plot-driven narrative "gripping" and "thought-provoking," without being "pedantic." A message-novel of sorts, we thought its delivery was "fair," and that Wiltz was "a calm, quiet voice that deserves to be heard." No doubt, it still does.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807126837
  • Publisher: Louisiana State University Press
  • Publication date: 3/28/2001
  • Series: Voices of the South Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 189
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Christine Wiltz, a native resident of New Orleans, is also the author of The Last Madam: A Life in the New Orleans Underworld and three mystery novels featuring Irish Channel detective Neal Rafferty. She coauthored a television documentary about David Duke, Backlash: Race and the American Dream, which aired on PBS in 1992.

Christine Wiltz, a native resident of New Orleans, is also the author of The Last Madam: A Life in the New Orleans Underworld and three mystery novels featuring Irish Channel detective Neal Rafferty. She coauthored a television documentary about David Duke, Backlash: Race and the American Dream, which aired on PBS in 1992.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)