Glitter Baby

( 144 )

Overview

Welcome to the world of the Glitter Baby

Fleur Savagar is the most beautiful woman in the world . . . to everyone but herself. With her oversized hands and paddle-boat feet, her streaky blond hair and funny green eyes, she lives a life filled with secrets that began before she was born. That was when her bewitching mother left home to find James Dean and met Errol Flynn instead. Now Fleur has to grow up quickly, and life won't make that easy....

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Glitter Baby

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Overview

Welcome to the world of the Glitter Baby

Fleur Savagar is the most beautiful woman in the world . . . to everyone but herself. With her oversized hands and paddle-boat feet, her streaky blond hair and funny green eyes, she lives a life filled with secrets that began before she was born. That was when her bewitching mother left home to find James Dean and met Errol Flynn instead. Now Fleur has to grow up quickly, and life won't make that easy.

Jake Koranda is both New York's most brilliant playwright and Hollywood's hottest actor. Difficult, talented, and tormented, he has no patience for international glamour girls, not even ones with beautiful bodies and smart-aleck mouths. But there's more to the Glitter Baby than shine, and Fleur's tougher than Jake expects. Even with the odds stacked against her, she's fiercely determined to discover the woman she's destined to be.

An ugly duckling who can't believe she's turned into a swan . . . A tough-guy movie star with a haunted past . . . In a land of broken dreams, can two unlikely lovers trust their hearts?

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061438561
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 12/30/2008
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 418,110
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.60 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Elizabeth Phillips

Susan Elizabeth Phillips has found fans all over the world with her warm and wonderful contemporary love stories that manage to touch both hearts and funny bones. She's the only four-time recipient of the Romance Writers of America's prestigious Favorite Book of the Year and was also honored with their Lifetime Achievement Award. A resident of the Chicago suburbs, she is a wife, the mother of two grown sons, an avid hiker, and—unlike some of her characters—notoriously inept at any sport requiring a ball.

Biography

Susan Elizabeth Phillips believes if Jane Austen were writing today, novels like Pride and Prejudice would be sitting on the bookshelf alongside the love stories that she and her fellow romance novelists pen. "Oh, and one more thing," she said, wagging her finger at a Chicago Tribune reporter in 1999, "Elizabeth Bennet and Mr. Darcy should have kissed at the end of that story, and if I'd have written it, they would have -- and it would have been a good kiss, too."

Such sass is Phillips' calling card, and since her 1994 football romance It Had to Be You, she’s been stitching threads of humor into her romance novels.

"I'm not a particularly funny person in person. I can't tell jokes, but it just seems like it happened when I started to write," she told The Romance Reader in 1997. "It wasn't anything that was planned. I'm a very intuitive writer; I just sort of let the characters talk to me, and they started saying funny things, so I wrote them down."

A schoolteacher until her first son was born, Phillips began writing in the early 1980s with her best friend and neighbor. The two were both regular readers and decided to try their hand at a book of their own, plotting their story during nightly bike rides with their toddlers in tow. They got the name of a publisher at Dell who liked the book and published it under the pen name Justine Cole.

Her friend moved into a legal career, but Phillips continued writing and publishing, this time under her own name. She released what she calls her "big books," titles like Fancy Pants and Honey Moon featuring Hollywood starlets and jet-setting London socialites.

Her stories, she has said, moved outside of the mainstream after that. She gives her romantic characters emotional wounds and personal difficulties that often impede their inevitable happy endings. But without such obstacles, there would be no story.

"I've grown increasingly interested in writing about family dynamics and much less interested in sticking a psychopath with a gun in any of my books," she said in an interview with the web site iVillage. "Technically, I've simply learned how to capitalize on my own distinctive voice and how to be a better storyteller."

The healing process that the characters go through is what makes the novels work. "Creative plotting adds sparkle, and entertaining, well-drawn secondary characters round out the novel, but it is the growing, healing relationship between the protagonists and how they finally form a family that touches the heartstrings and makes this contemporary romance an unforgettable read," the Library Journal wrote in a review of Phillips' 2000 book First Lady.

The dialogue, she has said, is also important. The exchanges in romance novels are satisfying to women who love to communicate, she told USA Today. "Women really like to talk. That's one of our processes. We talk to gather information. Women love the connection that comes from conversation," she said. "My husband says we broadcast. He thinks through things before he talks, but he says women just kind of broadcast until they zero in on what they want to say."

Phillips has also disputed the notion that romance novels are nothing more than books about "throbbing thighs." They aren't about sex, she told the Chicago Tribune in 1992, but are instead complicated fictions about women taking charge of their lives and being the stories' heroes.

"The woman always wins the man," she said, "and he always gets tamed in the end."

Good To Know

Phillips wanted to publish her first novel under the pseudonym Chastity Savage, but her best friend and co-author nixed the idea.

Though two of her books -- It Had to Be You and This Heart of Mine -- have football plots, Phillips doesn't consider herself much of a sports fan. "In my mind, if you don't have to wear mascara to do it, it doesn't count as recreation," she told Book Page.

Her family helps her keep the details straight. Husband Bill was her technical adviser on describing Dallie Beaudine's golf game in Fancy Pants, and son Zach's interest in knives, guns, and dead insects surfaced in Teddy, the son of the novel's leading lady. He also wrote and recorded a companion CD to her title This Heart of Mine, which is available from her web site.

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Read an Excerpt

Glitter Baby

Chapter One

The Glitter Baby was back. She paused inside the arched entrance to the Orlani Gallery so the opening night guests would have time to recognize her. The low buzz of polite party conversation mixed with the street noises outside as the patrons pretended to view the African primitives hanging on the walls. The air carried the scent of Joy, imported pâté de foie gras, and money. Six years had passed since hers was one of the most famous faces in America. The Glitter Baby wondered if they'd still remember . . . and what she would do if they didn't.

She gazed straight ahead with studied ennui, her lips slightly parted and her hands, bare of rings, relaxed at her sides. In ankle-strap stilettos she stood more than six feet tall, a beautiful Amazon with a thick mane of hair that fell past her shoulders. It used to be a game among New York's one-name hairdressers to try to identify the color with only a single word. They offered up "champagne," "butterscotch," "taffy," but never got it quite right because her hair was all those colors, interwoven threads of every shade of blond that changed hue with the light.

It wasn't just her hair that inspired the poetic. Everything about the Glitter Baby encouraged superlatives. Years earlier, a temperamental fashion editor had famously fired an assistant editor who made the mistake of referring to the celebrated eyes as "hazel." The editor herself rewrote the copy, describing the irises of Fleur Savagar's eyes as being "marbled with gold, tortoise, and startling sluices of emerald-green."

On this September evening in 1982, the Glitter Baby looked more beautiful than everas she gazed at the crowd. A trace of hauteur shone in her not-quite-hazel eyes, and her sculpted chin held an almost arrogant tilt, but inside, Fleur Savagar was terrified. She took a deep, steadying breath and reminded herself that the Glitter Baby had grown up, and she wouldn't ever let them hurt her again.

She watched the crowd. Diana Vreeland, impeccably dressed in an Yves Saint Laurent evening cape and black silk pants, studied a bronze Benin head, while Mikhail Baryshnikov, all cheeks and dimples, stood at the center of a group of women more interested in Russian charm than African primitives. In one corner a television anchorman and his socialite wife chatted with a fortyish French actress making her first public appearance since a not so hush-hush face-lift, while across from them, the pretty showpiece wife of a notoriously homosexual Broadway producer stood alone in a Mollie Parnis she had foolishly left unbuttoned to the waist.

Fleur's dress was different from everyone else's. Her designer had seen to that. You must be elegant, Fleur. Elegance, elegance, elegance in the Era of the Tacky. He'd cut bronze stretch satin on the bias and constructed a cleanly sculpted gown with a high neck and bare arms. At mid-thigh, he'd slashed the skirt in a long diagonal to the opposite ankle, then filled in the space with a waterfall flounce of the thinnest black point d'esprit. He'd teased her about the flounce, saying he'd been forced to design it as camouflage for her size-ten feet.

Heads began to turn, and she saw the exact instant when the crowd's curiosity changed to recognition. She slowly let out her breath. A hush fell over the gallery. A bearded photographer turned his Hasselblad from the French actress to Fleur and caught the picture that would take up the entire front page of the next morning's Women's Wear Daily.

Across the room, Adelaide Abrams, New York's most widely read gossip columnist, squinted toward the arched doorway. It couldn't be! Had the real Fleur Savagar finally been flushed out? Adelaide took a quick step forward and bumped into a multimillionaire real estate developer. She glanced wildly about for her own photographer, only to see that nafka from Harper's Bazaar already bearing down. Adelaide plunged past two startled socialites, and, like Secretariat going for the Triple Crown, made the final dash to Fleur Savagar's side.

Fleur had been watching the race between Harper's and Adelaide Abrams, and she didn't know whether she was relieved or not to see Adelaide winning. The columnist was a shrewd old bird, and it wouldn't be easy to put her off with half-truths and vague answers. On the other hand, Fleur needed her.

"Fleur my God it really is you I can't believe what I see with my very own eyes my God you look wonderful!"

"So do you, Adelaide." Fleur had a vaguely Midwestern accent, pleasant and slightly musical. No one listening would have guessed that English wasn't her first language. The bottom of her chin met the top of Adelaide's hennaed hair, and she had to lean down for their air kiss. Adelaide pulled her toward the back corner of the room, effectively cutting her off from the other members of the press.

"Nineteen seventy-six was a bad year for me, Fleur," she said. "I went through menopause. God forbid you should ever go through the hell I did. It would have lifted my spirits if you'd given me the story. But I guess you had too much on your mind to spare me a thought. Then, when you finally show up again in New York . . ." She shook her finger at Fleur's chin. "Let's just say you've disappointed me."

"Everything in its proper time."

"That's all you have to say?"

Fleur gave what she hoped was an inscrutable smile and took a glass of champagne from a passing waiter.

Adelaide grabbed a glass of her own. "I'll never forget your first Vogue cover if I live to be a hundred. Those bones of yours . . . and those great, big hands. No rings, no nail polish. They shot you in furs and a Harry Winston diamond choker that had to cost a quarter of a million."

"I remember."

"No one could believe it when you disappeared. Then Belinda . . ." A calculating expression crossed her face. "Have you seen her lately?"

Glitter Baby
. Copyright © by Susan Phillips. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 144 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(60)

4 Star

(37)

3 Star

(19)

2 Star

(20)

1 Star

(8)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 144 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 20, 2013

    Susan Elizabeth Phillips first published The Glitter Baby in 19

    Susan Elizabeth Phillips first published The Glitter Baby in 1987.  The current version, rewritten and published in 2009, is a rework of the original.  Overall, I found this a highly entertaining read even if it is a bit dated.  Fleur Savagar, the Glitter Baby, is the illegitimate child of Errol Flynn and Belinda, a failed Hollywood starlet.  (Yes, I know.  Modern readers have to do a Google search to identify Mr. Flynn.)  




    Scorned by Flynn and pregnant, Belinda lands on her feet by marrying millionaire Alexi Savagar, who hates Flynn and takes on the scorned mistress as revenge.  Alexi, however, is not fooled by Belinda’s attempts to persuade him the baby is his.  At birth, he packs Fleur off to a convenient French convent.  Belinda, now enjoying her position in Parisian society as Alexi’s wife, simply has a replacement child: Michel.




    However, Belinda’s indifference changes as Fleur grows into a beautiful woman.  Belinda sees the chance to realize her Hollywood dreams by transforming her daughter into The Glitter Baby.  Fleur is allowed to come home where Belinda begins to groom her for stardom.  Alexi, on the other hand, disappointed that his only son and heir Michel is gay, has a darker future in mind for his step-daughter who still believes he is her father.  




    Enter drop dead gorgeous movie star Jake Korada, who having served in Vietnam (another possible Google search for some readers), has his own emotional scars.  Jake reluctantly agrees to hire Fleur for a movie that is loosely based upon his own return from war.  Jake is screen writer, producer and star of the production.  Of course Fleur and Jake fall for each other during filming, but the apple cart is more than upset when Fleur finds her snake-like mother in a compromising position with Jake.




    Fleur flees to Paris to the man she believes is her father, only to be imprisoned in Alexi’s mansion where he reveals the name of her real father, now long dead.   Alexi, as snake-like as Belinda, also informs Fleur that he has selected  her to bear him a child to replace the disappointing Michel.  




    Horrified, Fleur escapes, but not before she destroys Alexi’s most prized possession, his vintage Bugatti.  The scene where Fleur takes a crowbar to the machine the revolting Alexi loves more than any human is one of the best in the book.




    Fleur disguises herself by chopping off her legendary blond locks, gaining twenty pounds, and by becoming the Girl Friday for a rock band.  Eventually she puts her anger at her truly awful parents behind her and makes her way to New York, where she decides to open her own talent agency.  One of her goals is promote the career of her aspiring actress friend, Kissy, and her brother Michel’s career as a fashion designer.  




    Reenter Jake, who asks Fleur to represent him, not as an actor, but as a screen writer.  Fleur’s struggles to avoid being destroyed by Alexi, who is bent on revenge for the Bugatti, to aid her friend and her brother, and to deal with her true feelings for Jake lead to a powerful conclusion.  Fleur emerges not as The Glitter Baby, but as a strong and powerful woman who has achieved well earned success and the love of her man.  Although a little dated, this is an entertaining read.  

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2004

    One of the best

    This is one of Susan Elizabeth Phillips best books. Much better than Fancy Pants or Hot Shot. A bit long but worth the time!

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 15, 2012

    Her absolute best book.

    I have read all of SEP's books and this one is a excellent explain of writing skill. Each character has their own story, their own trial to overcome. I was so wrapped up in the storyline the entire time. I agree this is not her typical light and breezy carefree writing but that honestly what I love about it - Fleur and Jake did not come together easily and yet their love proved to be most important.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 13, 2009

    Definitely don't judge this book by its cover . . .

    Glitter Baby was not what I expected at all. The cover is flashy, and the title is fun. I expected a light and breezy, carefree summer read. No such luck, though. The plot and some specific scenes were unexpectedly dark. I felt pity for every character at some point in the book. It was a slow read for me, and reading it really brought me down, once again a contrast to the sparkly, upbeat cover. The eighties setting was hard to take, too, when the cover misleads you into thinking it's more current. Re-releases should be clearly marked.
    It kind of reminded me of Fancy Pants, spanning a large number of years where the main character is mostly unhappy.
    Other than the above two mentioned titles, I love Susan Elizabeth Phillips' writing style. Most of her books are fast-paced, hilarious, and heart-warming. This Heart of Mine and Nobody's Baby But Mine are my favorites. I definitely haven't given up on her, since it turns out she wrote this a long time ago.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 27, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Not stereotypical S.E.P.

    This book is different from others by Phillips. There is a lot more character development and back story than in her other books, which usually just jump into the love story. Overall, an enjoyable read, but not one of my favorites by this author.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2009

    Disappointed!

    The humor in her books that I love so much was missing from "Glitter Baby"
    I had a hard time connecting with the characters. Definitely not one of her best story lines.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    Good read

    Good story but dated

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 21, 2010

    Cumbersome, Morose, Blah!

    I cannot stand not finishing books - and for that reason, I finished this book. I found the end of the book somewhat interesting with Jake and Fleur. There were parts that I found so unbelievable that I was skipping paragraphs just to get through it. The novel also covers a very long time frame (30 years) and there are a lot of breaks in time (jumping months) and switches in character point of view which affected the novel's flow (basically it didn't have any). It is also a very sad book; there is not much uplifting or heart warming (until the end) and I found myself being drug down by the mood set throughout the novel. Despite all of this I loved Jake and Fleur's characters and would have much preferred a simpler novel that focused more squarely on the two of them.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2009

    good

    COULD NOT PUT IT DOWN

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2009

    Excellent!

    The story is captivating and the characters, Fleur and Jake are lovable. I couldn't put it down. The story was excellent. Susan Elizabeth Phillips is a great author; she pulls you into the story and makes you feel connected to the characters. I definitely recommend this book. It is a heartwarming romantic adventure!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2009

    SEP never fails to deliver

    The re-release of Glitter Baby was well worth the wait. Great characters and an inciteful story about finding the true you and being brave enough to live that life. Anything by Susan Elizabeth Phillips is a wonderful reading experience.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2013

    !

    Would be nice to go to the review section and not not see plot spoilers revealing every detail of the book. How about letting us read the book and finding out for ourselves what happens? I know, novel idea,huh? You ppl are so rude and inconsiderate of others.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 16, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    F-----

    THis book deserves zero stars...it is going absolutely nowhere and I hate everything about it...I had to give up on this turd of a book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 1, 2009

    Be careful of this reprint

    As a huge fan of Susan Elizabeth Phillips, I looked forward to this early book. However, it is very clear that this is an early effort. Ms. Phillips' style and talent have come a long way from this book. My suggestion is to pass this one by and wait eagerly for a new publication.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2009

    Sidney Sheldon lives and breaths in this Susan Elizabeth Phillips novel

    Dated and not as humorous or well developed as her other novels.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    I love her books

    Normally I would write a joyous account of her book but this was so different from her others that are easy summer reading. I didn't really want to finish it but I plowed on through. I did not like it at all. This is not a feel good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2014

    To abbi

    Where are u u better anwer me be twen midnight and know

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2013

    Massie

    Hey Guys.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2013

    Allison is looked put meet at

    Hunger games rez one

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2013

    Great

    Great book! I enjoyed it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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