Global TV: Exporting Television and Culture in the World Market

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $7.64
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 68%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $7.64   
  • New (3) from $19.36   
  • Used (6) from $7.62   

Overview

A reporter for the Los Angeles Times once noted that “I Love Lucy is said to be on the air somewhere in the world 24 hours a day.” That Lucy’s madcap antics can be watched anywhere at any time is thanks to television syndication, a booming global marketplace that imports and exports TV shows. Programs from different countries are packaged, bought, and sold all over the world, under the watch of an industry that is extraordinarily lucrative for major studios and production companies.

In Global TV, Denise D. Bielb and C. Lee Harrington seek to understand the machinery of this marketplace, its origins and history, its inner workings, and its product management. In so doing, they are led to explore the cultural significance of this global trade, and to ask how it is so remarkably successful despite the inherent cultural differences between shows and local audiences. How do culture-specific genres like American soap operas and Latin telenovelas so easily cross borders and adapt to new cultural surroundings? Why is The Nanny, whose gum-chewing star is from Queens, New York, a smash in Italy? Importantly, Bielby and Harrington also ask which kinds of shows fail. What is lost in translation? Considering such factors as censorship and other such state-specific policies, what are the inevitable constraints of crossing over?

Highly experienced in the field, Bielby and Harrington provide a unique and richly textured look at global television through a cultural lens, one that has an undeniable and complex effect on what shows succeed and which do not on an international scale.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Global TV offers a richly textured account of the professional practices and protocols that govern the television marketplace. . . . A must read for those wishing to understand the complex cultural dynamics of globalization."

-Michael Curtin,author of Playing to the World's Biggest Audience: The Globalization of Chinese Film and TV

"Global TV is a major contribution to the important but neglected topic of globalization in cultural industries. Bielby and Harrington demonstrate the major role of distribution in shaping the characteristics and meanings of cultural exports. Through extensive field work they have obtained a rich body of insights into the perspectives of both television buyers and sellers in an industry that is changing rapidly over time and that varies greatly from one country to another."

-Diana Crane,author of The Production of Culture: Media and the Urban Arts

"Bielby and Harrington bring their sociological perspective and methodology to the study of internationalized television cultures, providing a fine grained net of evidence which test theories of globalization and cultural imperialism. This book should recast the landscape of global television studies."

-Christina Slade,author of The Real Thing: Doing Philosophy with Media

Through an ethnographic examination of the social organization of the global television marketplace, Bielby and Harrington make an important contribution that furthers understanding of the nature of global television business.

-Choice,

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780814799420
  • Publisher: New York University Press
  • Publication date: 8/17/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Denise D. Bielby is professor of Sociology and affiliated faculty in Film and Media Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the co-author (with C. Lee Harrington) of Soap Fans: Pursuing Pleasure and Making Meaning in Everyday Life and co-editor of Popular Culture: Production and Consumption.

C. Lee Harrington is professor of Sociology at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. In addition to her books with Denise Bielby, she is co-editor (with Jonathan Gray and Cornel Sandvoss) of Fandom: Identities and Communities in a Mediated World (NYU Press, 2007).

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Figures and Tables

Introduction 1

1 The Syndication Market in U.S. Television 22

2 Television in the Global Market 37

3 The (Continued) Relevance of Genre 66

4 Managing Television's Cultural Properties 101

5 Discourses of Distribution: Circuit Models of Television 144

Conclusion: Television's Culture World 175

Methodological Appendix 183

Notes 189

References 227

Index 253

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)