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Globalization of Food

Overview

Globalization has become perhaps the most central?and one of the most contested?terms in the social sciences in the present day. If one wishes to understand the conditions in which different groups of people live today, it seems increasingly impossible to ignore the aspects of those conditions that are seen to be characterized, or influenced, by "global" forces, movements and phenomena. Regarding particular phenomena, no matter how apparently "local" or parochial in nature, as being located within "global" flows ...

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Overview

Globalization has become perhaps the most central—and one of the most contested—terms in the social sciences in the present day. If one wishes to understand the conditions in which different groups of people live today, it seems increasingly impossible to ignore the aspects of those conditions that are seen to be characterized, or influenced, by "global" forces, movements and phenomena. Regarding particular phenomena, no matter how apparently "local" or parochial in nature, as being located within "global" flows or systems or structures, seems today to be a very necessary component of any effective sort of social investigation. Many social scientific scholars in the last decade or so have engaged in a "global turban" in their thinking, investigating key areas and facets of human life—such as work, economy, cities, politics, and media—in terms of how these are being affected, influenced and changed by (what can be taken to be) "globalizing forces." Themes of inter-societal, trans-societal and cross-planetary connections, structures, processes and movements are increasingly central across the social sciences, including sociology, anthropology, geography, political science, economics, international relations, and many humanities disciplines too. Moreover, such themes—and the controversies and polemics often attached to them—have become common currency in many spheres outside the academy, with politicians, businesspeople, political activists and citizens of all varieties taking up ideas associated with "globalization," and deploying them both to make sense of, and also sometimes to try to change, the world around them. This book covers the issues of globalization as they relate to food.

Contributors include Carole Counihan, Alan Warde, Pat Caplan, Alex McIntosh, Rick Wilk, Jeff Sobal, Marianne Lien and Krishnendu Ray.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781845208165
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 2/16/2010
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

David Inglis is a professor of Sociology at the University of Aberdeen.

Debra Gimlin is a lecturer in Sociology at the University of Aberdeen.

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Table of Contents

Contributors vii

Part I Globalization and Food: Key Issues

1 Food Globalizations: Ironies and Ambivalences of Food, Cuisine and Globality David Inglis Debra Gimlin 3

Part II Food Globalizations: Production and Distribution

2 Slow Food and the Politics of 'Virtuous Globalization' Alison Leitch 45

3 Standards, Science and Scale: The Case of Tasmanian Atlantic Salmon Marianne Elisabeth Lien 65

4 Virtue and Valorization: 'Local Food' in the United States and France Michaela DeSoucey Isabelle T?choueyres 81

5 Quality Conventions and Governance in the Wine Trade: A Global Value Chain Approach Stefano Ponte 97

6 Food Systems and the Local Trap Branden Born Mark Purcell 117

7 Fairtrade Food: Connecting Producers and Consumers Caroline Wright 139

Part III Food Globalizations: Preparation and Consumption

8 The National and the Cosmopolitan in Cuisine: Constructing America through Gourmet Food Writing Jos?e Johnston Shyon Baumann Kate Cairns 161

9 Difference on the Menu: Neophilia, Neophobia and Globalization Richard Wilk 185

10 Eating Your Way to Global Citizenship Danielle Gallegos 197

11 Exotic Restaurants and Expatriate Home Cooking: Indian Food in Manhattan Krishnendu Ray 213

12 Globalization and the Challenge of Variety: A Comparison of Eating in Britain and France Alan Warde 227

13 Hispanic Foodways in the San Luis Valley of Colorado: The Local, Global, Hybrid and Processed Fourth of July Feast Carole Counihan 243

14 Globalization and Obesity Jeffery Sobal Wm. Alex McIntosh 255

15 'Is It Real Food?': Who Benefits from Globalization in Tanzania and India? Pat Caplan 273

Index 291

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