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Glumlot Letters

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Overview

With wit and humor, this delightful work covers the serious matter of recovery from alcoholism. In the same way that C.S.Lewis's The Screwtape Letters taught spiritual principles, Glumlot presents a practical application of the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous.

In letters to a fellow devil, Glumlot writes about his attempts in tempting a human away from A.A., sobriety, and recovery. He discusses meetings, sponsorship, the Big Book and the Steps in great detail, and warns ...

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Overview

With wit and humor, this delightful work covers the serious matter of recovery from alcoholism. In the same way that C.S.Lewis's The Screwtape Letters taught spiritual principles, Glumlot presents a practical application of the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous.

In letters to a fellow devil, Glumlot writes about his attempts in tempting a human away from A.A., sobriety, and recovery. He discusses meetings, sponsorship, the Big Book and the Steps in great detail, and warns that these can lead a human to "...an intractable infection of serenity by the Enemy [God]."

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Editorial Reviews

Audrey DeLaMarte
In a wickedly delicious parody of C.S. Lewis' Screwtape Letters, Stanley M. turns his sights on the Twelve Steps and the recovery process. The Glumlot Letters are correspondence between two devils, Twigmold and Glumlot, and the subject is tempting a human away from AA, sobriety and recovery. Twigmold's "patient" has begun drinking to excess and he's delighted. Glumlot warns him, however, not to take heart too soon, to examine the quality of the blackouts. If the blackout "blocks the light of the Enemy," and suspends rational judgment, it is a triumph for the Lowerarchy and an excellent opportunity for Twigmold to make his appearance and make his patient feel "abandoned and utterly hopeless." The patient, however, turns to AA and is poised on the threshold of Step Four, to Twigmold's dismay. Don't worry, says Glumlot. Convince him that he can do it by himself and that it has to be an exactly perfect "scorching and clueless" inventory. Whatever the author aims at, he hits a bullseye, and he doesn't miss a misunderstanding about the Steps or a place where we can trip over human egoisms and fall on our recovering faces. If we've had a stumbling recovery, probably this book will show us where our problems lie.
Audrey DeLaMarte

In a wickedly delicious parody of C.S. Lewis' Screwtape Letters, Stanley M. turns his sights on the Twelve Steps and the recovery process. The Glumlot Letters are correspondence between two devils, Twigmold and Glumlot, and the subject is tempting a human away from AA, sobriety and recovery.

Twigmold's "patient" has begun drinking to excess and he's delighted. Glumlot warns him, however, not to take heart too soon, to examine the quality of the blackouts. If the blackout "blocks the light of the Enemy," and suspends rational judgment, it is a triumph for the Lowerarchy and an excellent opportunity for Twigmold to make his appearance and make his patient feel "abandoned and utterly hopeless."

The patient, however, turns to AA and is poised on the threshold of Step Four, to Twigmold's dismay. Don't worry, says Glumlot. Convince him that he can do it by himself and that it has to be an exactly perfect "scorching and clueless" inventory.

Whatever the author aims at, he hits a bullseye, and he doesn't miss a misunderstanding about the Steps or a place where we can trip over human egoisms and fall on our recovering faces. If we've had a stumbling recovery, probably this book will show us where our problems lie.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780965967235
  • Publisher: Capizon Publishing
  • Publication date: 6/28/2003
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 738,077
  • Product dimensions: 5.52 (w) x 8.48 (h) x 0.56 (d)

Meet the Author

During the day, Stanley M.(Los Angeles, CA) an AA member since 1983, is disguised as a mild-mannered financial executive; at night he will be at an AA meeting or playing jazz guitar!
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Read an Excerpt

[from Letter #4]

I received your urgent letter. So your patient has been invited to an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting and what should you do? For Hell's sake, don't panic. Use the skills you have learned and make the most of each situation to wrench the patient away from the truth, light, and freedom, and move him closer to the banquet table for Our Father Below.

I have attended many of these A.A. meetings-more than I would care to admit-and the key to success is being quick and precise in using the basic techniques of distraction, befuddlement and fear.

Before I go into detail, I am obligated to warn you of the potential danger of accompanying your fellow to a meeting. It is possible that one or more of the humans in attendance are in very close contact with the Enemy. They will be surrounded by that impenetrable light upon which we must not even glance. But do not be discouraged. Many meetings are conducted without these folks present.

If your fellow is asked to read something from the standard liturgy, you should hope it is the one with all the unpronounceable "anonymities" in it. Most newcomers fumble this word without our help, and you can convert excitement into embarrassment, and pride into humiliation.

[from Letter #9]

Oh, by the way, if your patient does spend any time reading from the book concerning the Second Step, be sure to read over his shoulder and catch the part about the "bedevilments." I was so surprised when I first saw it. It is clearly a reverent tribute to our work. It recognizes nearly the whole range of our area of expertise, and clearly portrays the extent of our effect on humans when in the hands of a master tempter. [from Letter #11]

If he wants to dabble with an inventory, try the following format: tell him he is not oversensitive, it is just self-directed empathy; he is not childish, he has a youthful mind; he is not greedy, just motivated to be self-sufficient; his manner isn't pompous and grandiose, he is self-confident; he is not inconsiderate, he is free from the obsession about what others think; he is not conceited, he has learned to love himself; he is not lustful, he just has an abundance of natural desires.

[from Letter #17]

Some humans, especially non-drinkers, give us all the credit for getting our patients drunk. It is not like that at all. We suggest the first drink, but only the disease can hold the door open long enough for the idea to get in. No human in his right mind, who had an allergy such as this would ever drink again, but the illness somehow erases the memory or circumvents normal logic. We can knock on the door. It is the alcoholic who must answer. He must come alone if he is going to drink and once again set the cycle in motion. In some cases, the Enemy is at the gate with him. So you try again some other time. We can "Keep coming back," too!

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Table of Contents

1 Letter 1. Drinking 2 Letter 2. Blackouts 3 Letter 3. The Problem Drinker 4 Letter 4. Invitation to an AA Meeting 5 Letter 5. Keep Coming Back 6 Letter 6. Sponsors 7 Letter 7. Step One 8 Letter 8. Step Two 9 Letter 9. One Day at a Time 10 Letter 10. Step Three Part 11 Letter 11. Step Four, Part 1 12 Letter 12. Step Four, Part 2 13 Letter 13. Step Five 14 Letter 14. Emotions 15 Letter 15. Step Six 16 Letter 16. Hobbies 17 Letter 17. Step Seven; Slips 18 Letter 18. Work 19 Letter 19. Steps Eight and Nine 20 Letter 20. Step Ten; Driving 21 Letter 21. Step Eleven 22 Letter 22. Step Twelve 23 Letter 23. In the Beginning 24 Letter 24. Thank You
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 13, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Enlightening! Intriguing, adept writing...

    Stanley M. chose well in his decision to emulate C.S. Lewis's "The Screwtape Letters" in order to provide insight to the power of the process of the 12-Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous to affect recovery from alcoholism. Stanley's intriguing, adept writing in this epistolary novel support the wisdom of that choice with every Step. To work with Stanley was a pleasure, and I am honored he entrusted its editing to me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2000

    Clever, Entertaining, and Enlightening

    This is the most clever, entertaining, and enlightening book on recovery I have ever read. I know that you will love it too. -- Frank D. - Author of The Annotated AA Handbook

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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