Gluten-Free Girl: How I Found the Food That Loves Me Back...And How You Can Too

( 26 )

Overview

A delightful memoir of learning to eat superbly while remaining gluten free.
?Newsweek magazine

"Give yourself a treat! Gluten-Free Girl offers delectable tips on dining and living with zest?gluten-free. This is a story for anyone who is interested in changing his or her life from the inside out!"
?Alice Bast, executive director National Foundation for Celiac Awareness

"Shauna's food, the ignition of healthy ...

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Gluten-Free Girl: How I Found the Food That Loves Me Back...And How You Can Too

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Overview

A delightful memoir of learning to eat superbly while remaining gluten free.
Newsweek magazine

"Give yourself a treat! Gluten-Free Girl offers delectable tips on dining and living with zest–gluten-free. This is a story for anyone who is interested in changing his or her life from the inside out!"
—Alice Bast, executive director National Foundation for Celiac Awareness

"Shauna's food, the ignition of healthy with delicious, explodes with flavor—proof positive that people who choose to eat gluten-free can do it with passion, perfection, and power."
—John La Puma, MD, New York Times bestselling co-author of The RealAge Diet and Cooking the RealAge Way

"A breakthrough first book by a gifted writer not at all what I expected from a story about living with celiac disease. Foodies everywhere will love this book. Celiacs will make it their bible."
—Linda Carucci, author of Cooking School Secrets for Real World Cooks and IACP Cooking Teacher of the Year, 2002

An entire generation was raised to believe that cooking meant opening a box, ripping off the plastic wrap, adding water, or popping it in the microwave. Gluten-Free Girl, with its gluten-free healthful approach, seeks to bring a love of eating back to our diets. Living gluten-free means having to give up traditional bread, beer, pasta, as well as the foods where gluten likes to hide—such as store-bought ice cream, chocolate bars, even nuts that might have been dusted with flour. However, Gluten-Free Girl shows readers how to say yes to the foods they can eat. Written by award-winning blogger Shauna James, who became a interested in food once she was diagnosed with celiac disease and went gluten-free, Gluten-Free Girl is filled with funny accounts of the author’s own life including wholesome, delicious recipes, this book will guide readers to the simple pleasures of real, healthful food. Includes dozens of recipes like salmon with blackberry sauce, sorghum bread, and lemon olive oil cookies as well as resources for those living gluten-free.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
* Blogger Ahern's story sheds light on celiac disease, a little-known and difficult-to-diagnose autoimmune condition. Those afflicted cannot digest gluten, a protein in wheat, barley, rye, and related grains. Ahern explains how she learned of her malady and found that she was able to enjoy food while avoiding gluten. She even met and married a chef. This entertaining memoir includes gluten-free gourmet recipes. (Library Journal, February 1, 2008)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470137307
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 10/5/2007
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Shauna James Ahern has loved food all her lie. In May 2005, she was diagnosed with celiac disease, a fate that she embraced joyfully. Immediately after going gluten-free, she started a food blog, glutenfreegirl.com, where she shares stories, photographs, and recipes. Her Web site won best Food blog with a Theme in 2006 and receives thousands of hits a day. She is considered one of the most authoritative sources on gluten-free living on the Internet. She lives in Seattle with her husband, Daniel Ahern, a professional chef. She doesn't miss gluten at all.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

1 A Brand-Name Childhood.

2 On My Own.

3 The Ten Noble Tastes.

4 Free to Be You and Me, Gluten-Free.

5 Vegetarians, Please Avert Your Eyes.

6 Going Against the Grain.

7 The Pleasure of Vegetables.

8 Luscious and Sumptuous Fruit.

9 Truly Tasting My Life.

10 Guilty Pleasures.

11 Feeling Comfortable in the Kitchen.

12 Life, Gluten-Free.

Epilogue Yes.

What Is Gluten and Where Does It Hide?

Resources.

Index.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 26 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(7)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 11 of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2009

    A Writer/Foodie Writes a Memoir...Oh, and She's a Celiac

    I ordered this book thinking it was a cookbook. It's actually a celiac memoir. Not terrible reading to pass the time. Read it on the train, or plane, or the bathroom. Shauna's writing is organized, she is obviously well educated, and it shows that she cares about writing and eating well. So it would seem that for her this book is her love letter about food, based on her experiences and offered up to the world, honestly noble in her intentions.<BR/><BR/>Unfortunately it is not simply a cookbook with an attached warning sticker: "Written for Foodies", and I'm sure Shuana would argue that's not the point--that the point is we see that food is accessible, and that we should all dine from the world's grand table, with all of it's finest offerings. She's *right*, perhaps we should. But she's delusional, too. Most people who face celiac disease are looking to eat so they don't get sick...not so they spend more $$ to eat "well", which is entirely subjective. Most of us aren't 150 yards from the fresh fish market like she is, and most of us are working families who see a movie out with the kids as a splurge....so um...'no'...we probably don't want to go out and buy pomegranite molasses.<BR/><BR/>On Shauna's list: "The Top Ten Noble Tastes" there is no reference to the "other grains" considered staples in most kitchens, and a lifeline for many celiacs. Really (and I mean really) expensive vinegars and oils, but no sustenance staples upon which the average celiac would rely, and would have rather seen listed here.<BR/><BR/>Don't get me wrong--Shauna is an excellent writer....but her book lacks any real substance, and she sends mixed messages....such as using highly negative descriptive words for the foods from her past----foods she admits to having loved and wolfed down with gusto----and highly seductive and beautiful imagery for the "new foods".....and then using those same positive descriptives for a hot dog (when she finally breaks down and starts eating meat again) at a NYC outdoor vendor....even though that kind of food would have fallen into the "bad food" category if it had been from her hometown. She arbitrarily decides for us what food falls into the praiseworthy category, and what foods do not belong, and when she's critical---boy is she ever critical! She purposefully overdramatizes to get her points across and in doing so makes her parents out to sound like unstable people who practically poisoned her, despite the fact that she went willingly. They are just as innocent as she was, in other words. It also seems cruel that she would use this forum to discuss a very personal private hell her mother endured surrounding agoraphobia. That's not what human beings should do do each other, much less family.<BR/><BR/>The tone of the book is summed up on page 53, wherein Shauna admits "....Two kids raised to believe that they should be different than most people (translation: smarter and more educated)..."<BR/><BR/>A bit of an alienating read...which is a total shame because if she had taken certain unnecessary personal bits (her ego clearly sat on top of her computer staring at her as she hacked this one out) out of it the book would have been superb.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2008

    A reviewer

    I have been interested in going gluten free for several years now and have read a lot on this subject. There is very little helpful information in this book. Also, what little info you do receive it's very unrealistic. This woman obviously has a lot of time to spend on herself (no children and married later in life). I could not relate at all. Pass on this one - there are better books out there on the subject.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2009

    Ho hum

    I have tried to read this book several times and have never been able to get all the way through it. The information isn't organized well and her personal narrative jumps around a lot chronologically. She goes on and on about family issues, including her mother's health problems. There's a big long section on her relationship with her husband which seems like total TMI. Some of the recipes sound ok but I also read her blog and have seen photos of these dishes and have not been inspired to make them. I will stick with more tried and true resources, thank you very much.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2008

    Pass on this one

    I find it interesting that Mr. Ahern's best reviews come from gushy people who claim to just love, love, love her blog.... and who often post links to their own blogs in their comments. Hoping for reciprocal comments from a published author? Sounds like it to me. I agree with most of the previous posters- if you're looking for ways to improve your gluten-free life and eating habits, save your money and look elsewhere. In this book, Ms. Ahern is at best repetitive and grasping, and at worst preachy, overblown and condescending. Her recipes seem to be mostly hurried, unprofessional adaptations from great cookbooks- something you can do yourself with a bit of research- that, in our house anyway, didn't bring anything new or exciting to our gluten-free table. If you really are interested in what Ms. Ahern has to say, skip the book and check out her blog archives, per the previous poster's suggestions. She had some great ideas when she started the blog, but as she's gotten better-known, her writing and content have gone downhill. Unfortunately, you won't find anything new or interesting in this book. Here's hoping that, with a good editor, the next one will be an improvement!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2007

    A reviewer

    Love the blog but the book leaves a lot to be desired. I'm not sure how much I really care about the fact that the author was reading at the age of 3. I'm really not sure how the author's romance fits into living gluten free. I did enjoy elements of the book--parts about the junk she ate as a kid, we can all identify with. I didn't enjoy it so much when she talked about it for the 15th time. If you are looking for GF recipes, keep looking--there are only a few and they are time consuming for the most part. Honestly, I'm not sure who this book is for: If you're living gluten free, you already know this stuff. If you're a foodie, it will seem amaturish.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 11, 2010

    TMI -- cringe ---groan

    ick!!! That is one sick relationship with food. Way TMI about flaunting most aspects her life, coupled with an oddly pretentious coyness about other aspects. Why mention things if you "can't tell us"? Very little useful info about coping with celiac on a daily basis. This is truly a case of bloggers going wild and thinking they should be authors. Insulting to the readers. Overall....just makes you cringe.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2008

    better than a cookbook

    This is a memoir and a great cookbook! Enjoyed reading it as a memoir, and received a lot of good hints about cooking from the cookbook parts. Taught me more than I ever knew and I am 70 years old. You don't have to need gluten-free eating to benefit from this book.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2007

    A reviewer

    The author is very repetitive. She has no clue as to how the average person shops and offers no solutions to find gluten-free foods locally, for those of us that do not live in or around Seattle. There are few recipes, and none that would be kid-friendly to the average child. She is also very harsh to her parents for feeding her the wrong foods, even though she wasn't diagnosed with celiac until she was an adult. Should they have psychically known she had celiac? The 'love story' is sappy at best. Do we really need to read how they cry over food? How does that help me find gluten-free solutions to every day cooking problems? The author is almost obsessed with food. It was a bit creepy to me to read about it. Overall, there are lots of other books with actual GF living pointers and tips that aren't as filled with ego and flowery prose...go read them and take a pass on this one.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2012

    I didn't care for the author's pompous and amateur writing style

    I didn't care for the author's pompous and amateur writing style. I give it two stars because I sympathize with any fellow celiac sufferer, but I wish I hadn't suffered through her prose.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2007

    A reviewer

    Shauna Ahern is the exuberant woman behind the Gluten Free Girl website, a woman who found herself, upon reaching middle age, with a Celiac disease diagnosis and surprisingly a new start in life. It took a while to figure out what I didn't like about this book, but I think it's very simple: The author's insights and experiences, while interesting in blog form, don't really add up to a book. While it's a very useful piece for someone with Celiac disease, there's nothing here you can't find on her website. Further, when I think of food memior I actually think of someone whose worked many years in the field. Not a blogger who is, at best, a talented home cook. Alice Waters, Julia Child, Ruth Reichl, etc. I kept asking myself 'why is this relevant? who is this woman?' Finally, I found the book extremely redundant. Why didn't her editor take care of this problem? Overall, a nice source for those who must avoid gluten, but check it out of your library. Better yet, settle in for a few hours in front of your computer. Her blog, while a bit sparse in recent months, has lots of great information in her archives.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2007

    treasure your food

    Most of you can see by the numerous favorable responses that this book has a profound message to deliver. Reading through the few distasteful reviews, they obviously did not understand its biggest concept. When you honor your body with the best foods possible, it honors you back and stimulates your intellectual senses. You feel whole, present and alive. This is what the author wants to share with you. Her candid and remarkable descriptions of food accurately portray the very essence of nutrition and nurturing yourself. No two experiences will be the same, but her emotional connections with locally grown produce, so much so that she can taste the entire growth history, leaves me craving food with character instead of chemical processes. To deny the accessibility to the marvelous suggested edibles in this book means you aren't looking hard enough. You may not have heard of these foods, but within our current boundless marketplace, you have access to so much more than what your large grocery chain carries. In fact, the best advice from this book is to go explore those small, local businesses and farmers markets that are treasures waiting to be found. And for one critic to say your children won't like exotic tastes is very close-minded. On the contrary, the best thing you can ever do for your children is to expose them to as much of life and new things as possible, whether it's food, people, cultures or beliefs. To serve them mac and cheese from a box repeatedly just because they ask for it is dishonoring their self-understanding and perception of life. The only reason I cannot give this book five stars is for repeated information that could have been easily edited out. I found it an interesting contrast that when reading a blog, having information repeated from post to post is not as tiresome. But in printed book form my expectations change and I don't need to read it again, even between a day's pause. I find this an intriguing variance in our fast- paced society where information is constantly being thrown at us and quickly forgotten or discarded. Maybe it's the nature of the medium and the stand-alone quality of a blog post. I easily forgave this due to the restricted timeline the author was put under and the importance of the facts being delivered. Uniquely written so that an avid reader of her blog is not fatigued, her stories and accounts are for you to relate and question your connections to food and life. They are her own accounts and artistry, not for you to precisely replicate. I found them inspiring enough to take a new look at my entire life, not just when I sit down at the dinner table. I read her blog regularly and find it resets my reasonings and judgments on the world to be more kind and understanding instead of knotted up in unloving reactions. Loving is the key to happiness and this book embellishes how food is an essential part of that. As she often quotes from Rumi, 'Everything has to do with loving and not loving.' Maybe that's a dose of something we should all consume daily.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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