Glycoimmunology 2

Overview

The second installment of this outstanding treatise constitutes a single source for the rapid advances in glycobiology, from the basic biochemistry of carbohydrate physiology, to therapeutic trials using synthetic sugars designed to block inflammatory responses.
Subjects are arranged in sections on -- glycobiology basics -- oligosaccharides and protein recognition -- oligosaccharides and biological function -- glycosylation and inflammation -- ...
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Paperback (1998)
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Overview

The second installment of this outstanding treatise constitutes a single source for the rapid advances in glycobiology, from the basic biochemistry of carbohydrate physiology, to therapeutic trials using synthetic sugars designed to block inflammatory responses.
Subjects are arranged in sections on -- glycobiology basics -- oligosaccharides and protein recognition -- oligosaccharides and biological function -- glycosylation and inflammation -- glycosylation and disease -- glycotherapeutics

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Excellent reviews...the contributors, internationally known for their research in the area of glycobiology, do a great job of outlining the current knowledge...should prove a welcome addition to laboratories."
Doody's Review Service
Eugene Thonar
The Jenner International Glycoimmunology Meetings have charted the rapid development of glycobiology within the field of inflammation. This book summarizes the fourth meeting in considerable detail, which was held recently in Greece. It emphasizes recent advances in the field of the basic biochemistry of glycoimmunology and its importance in the clinical setting. The purpose is to provide clinicians and scientists with up-to-date facts within the field of glycoimmunology. The book contains excellent reviews of current knowledge in 19 selected areas as well as a few original presentations of recent research findings. The contributors, internationally known for their research in the area of glycobiology, do a great job of outlining current knowledge of the functions of specific oligosaccharides. An attractive aspect of the book is its comprehensive treatment of the consequences of changes in oligosaccharide structure and function in inflammation and other disease-related processes. Each of the 19 topics reviewed is covered in considerable detail. As there is little attempt to integrate the different presentations, the book may be of less interest to scientists peripherally involved in the area than to those who intend to or already are performing research in the fields of glycobiology or glycoimmunology. The individual reviews summarize current knowledge of research in the area with clarity. Illustrations and current references are used judiciously. This compilation of individual reviews of current knowledge in the field of glycoimmunology should prove a welcome addition to laboratories interested in learning about the structure and functions of oligosaccharides in health anddisease.
Booknews
Contains papers from a November 1996 meeting, reflecting advances in glycobiology, basic biochemistry of carbohydrate physiology, and therapeutic trials using synthetic sugars to block inflammatory responses. Papers are arranged in sections on glycobiology basics, oligosaccharides and protein recognition, oligosaccharides and biological function, glycosylation and inflammation, glycosylation and disease, and glycotherapeutics. Some subjects include immunodetection of glycosyltransferases, glycosylation and rheumatic disease, and carbohydrate recognition systems in innate immunity. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Eugene Thonar, PhD (Rush Medical College of Rush University)
Description: The Jenner International Glycoimmunology Meetings have charted the rapid development of glycobiology within the field of inflammation. This book summarizes the fourth meeting in considerable detail, which was held recently in Greece. It emphasizes recent advances in the field of the basic biochemistry of glycoimmunology and its importance in the clinical setting.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide clinicians and scientists with up-to-date facts within the field of glycoimmunology. The book contains excellent reviews of current knowledge in 19 selected areas as well as a few original presentations of recent research findings. The contributors, internationally known for their research in the area of glycobiology, do a great job of outlining current knowledge of the functions of specific oligosaccharides. An attractive aspect of the book is its comprehensive treatment of the consequences of changes in oligosaccharide structure and function in inflammation and other disease-related processes.
Audience: Each of the 19 topics reviewed is covered in considerable detail. As there is little attempt to integrate the different presentations, the book may be of less interest to scientists peripherally involved in the area than to those who intend to or already are performing research in the fields of glycobiology or glycoimmunology.
Features: The individual reviews summarize current knowledge of research in the area with clarity. Illustrations and current references are used judiciously.
Assessment: This compilation of individual reviews of current knowledge in the field of glycoimmunology should prove a welcome addition to laboratories interested in learning about the structure and functions of oligosaccharides in health and disease.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

Table of Contents

Glycobiology: The Basics: Novel Pathways in Complex-Type Oligosaccharide Synthesis: New Vistas Opened by Studies in Invertebrates; D.H. Van den Eijnden, et al. Defective Glycosyltransferases Are Not Good for Your Health; H. Schachter, et al. Probing CarbohydrateProtein Interactions by HighResolution NMR Spectroscopy; S.W. Homans, et al. Oligosaccharides and Protein Recognition: The Structure of a Human Rheumatoid Factor Bound to IgG Fc; B.J. Sutton, et al. Carbohydrate Recognition Systems in Innate Immunity; T. Feizi. Biosynthesis of Sulfated LSelectin Ligands in Human High Endothelial Venules (HEV); J.P. Girard, F. Amalric. Endothelial Sialyl Lewis x as a Crucial Glycan Decoration on LSelectin Ligands; R. Renkonen. Role of LectinGlycoconjugate Recognitions in CellCell Interactions Leading to Tissue Invasion; C. Kieda. Oligosaccharides and Biological Function: Protein OGlcNAcylation: Potential Mechanisms for the Regulation of Protein Function; B.K. Hayes, G.W. Hart. A Longitudinal Study of Glycosylation of a Human IgG3 Paraprotein in a Patient with Multiple Myeloma; M. Farooq, et al. The Role of The Lectin Calnexin in Conformation Independent Binding to NLinked Glycoproteins and Quality Control; J.J.M. Bergeron, et al. Glycosylation and Inflammation: Immunodetection of Glycosyltransferases: Prospects and Pitfalls; E.G. Berger, et al. Cytokine and Protease Glycosylation as a Regulatory Mechanism in Inflammation and Autoimmunity; P. Van den Steen, et al. Occurrence and Possible Function of InflammationInduced Expression of Sialyl Lewis-X on Acute-Phase Proteins; W. Van Dijk, et al. Glycosylation and Disease: The Glycosylation of the Complement Regulatory Protein, Human Erythrocyte CD59; P.M. Rudd, et al. Glycosylation and Rheumatic Disease; J.S. Axford. IgA Glycosylation in IgA Nephropathy; A. Allen, J. Feehally. Oligosaccharide Profiling of Acute-Phase Proteins: A Possible Strategy towards Better Markers in Disease; G.A. Turner, M.T. Goodarzi. The Role of NLinked Glycosylation in the Secretion of Hepatitis B Virus; A. Mehta, et al. Role of Glycan Processing in Hepatitis B Virus Envelope Protein Trafficking; T.M. Block, et al. Glycotherapeutics: Combinatorial Carbohydrate Chemistry; Z.G. Wang, O. Hindsgaul. Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides: Candidate Vaccines to Prevent Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae Infections; E.R. Moxon, et al. Development of Double Copy Dicistronic Retroviral Vectors for Transfer and Expression of Glycosyltransferase Genes; D. Izycki, et al. Oligosaccharide Epitope Diversity and Therapeutic Potential; E.F. Hounsell, D.V. Renouf. The Group B Streptococcal Capsular Carbohydrate: Immune Response and Molecular Mimicry; R.G. Feldman, et al. Index.
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