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Gobble You Up!
     

Gobble You Up!

by Sunita Sunita (Artist), Gita Wolf (Text by)
 

"Readers familiar with a certain old lady who swallowed a fly will revel in this adaptation of a Rajasthani trickster tale. Beautifully illustrated." - Kirkus Reviews

"It’s a surefire tale made splendid by gorgeous illustrations and bookmaking. . . As creatures accumulate in the jackal’s belly, the stylized forms are cleverly, and beautifully,

Overview


"Readers familiar with a certain old lady who swallowed a fly will revel in this adaptation of a Rajasthani trickster tale. Beautifully illustrated." - Kirkus Reviews

"It’s a surefire tale made splendid by gorgeous illustrations and bookmaking. . . As creatures accumulate in the jackal’s belly, the stylized forms are cleverly, and beautifully, re-formed and rearranged, to excellent effect. Meticulously, the art is silkscreened onto sturdy kraft paper by a dozen printers (credited by name), and hand bound (the binders are also named)... a true work of art." - starred review, Horn Book Magazine

"Punchy writing and bold images make this a promising read-aloud prospect." -Publishers Weekly

Meet the most wily jackal in the forest. Too lazy to hunt for food, he decides to trick his friend the crane, and soon gets carried away, gobbling up every animal he encounters. This lighthearted story, told in cumulative rhyme, is an adaptation of an oral trickster tale from Rajasthan, India. It is illustrated in finger paintings by the talented Sunita, a young woman artist from the Meena tribe. Sunita adapts her traditional art form, Mandna, traditionally painted by women on the walls and floors of their village homes.

Each copy is made completely by hand.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
09/02/2013
In this Indian folktale, a greedy jackal eats every animal he meets. “My, you’ve put on weight!” a peacock tells the jackal, who’s already eaten 12 fish, a crane, tortoise, squirrel, and cat. “I’m not fat!” yells the jackal. “And if anyone says so, I have to gobble them up!” Wolf (The Enduring Ark) packs her lines with distinctive noises—“And zutth! that was the end of the peacock”—and builds a cumulative verse with each animal: “Listen peacock/ full of poise—/Don’t call me fat!/ I ate a cat!” Smart design shows Sunita’s folk art animals to their best advantage. The intricately detailed b&w animals (painted in a traditional style known as Mandana) appear against brown butcher-paper pages and stand out as clearly as signs. All the animals inside the jackal can be seen in cutaway; when he bursts, inevitably, the animals fall out unharmed. The jackal is unruffled: “A tailor bird will stitch my tummy up again.” Punchy writing and bold images make this a promising readaloud prospect. It’s a work of art, too, hand-silkscreened, each numbered copy part of a limited edition. Ages 3–up. (Oct.)
From the Publisher

"Readers familiar with a certain old lady who swallowed a fly will revel in this adaptation of a Rajasthani trickster tale. Beautifully illustrated . . . this handsome volume is an art object in itself." - Kirkus Reviews

"Punchy writing and bold images make this a promising readaloud prospect. It’s a work of art, too" - Publishers Weekly

"The arresting black-and-white images and gorgeous design of this handmade book make it an unusual and prized gift." -Shelf Awareness

School Library Journal
01/01/2014
PreS-Gr 2—In this adaptation of a traditional oral Rajasthani trickster tale, a wily jackal, who is too lazy to go hunting himself, challenges his best friend to catch 12 fish. The friend, an unsuspecting crane, accomplishes the task quite easily, but is shocked and chagrined when the jackal gobbles them all up and then unexpectedly swallows her, too. When a passing tortoise protests, the jackal sings "Ta ta tortoise," making a snack of the poor reptile. The hungry canine travels through the forest and proceeds to eat every animal who crosses his path, even an elephant. At last, feeling stuffed from his unconventional meal, he lumbers down to the river for a drink of water, where his stomach bursts and everyone tumbles out, rejoicing. The narrative unfolds in cumulative rhyme and is accompanied by distinctive geometric finger paintings created in the ancient Mandna style passed down from mother to daughter. The illustrations are silk screen, printed by hand in black and white. On each page, the jackal grows a little plumper as the crowd of intricately designed animals in his stomach increases. An author's note chronicles the history of the Mandna art form and the genesis of this carefully crafted picture book. Pair this title with another cautionary story, Monkey: a Trickster Tale from India by Gerald McDermott (Houghton Harcourt, 2011).—Linda L. Walkins, Saint Joseph Preparatory High School, Boston, MA
Kirkus Reviews
2013-08-15
Readers familiar with a certain old lady who swallowed a fly will revel in this adaptation of a Rajasthani trickster tale. Beautifully illustrated in a traditional finger-painting style called Mandna, practiced by the Meena tribe in Rajasthan, the black-and-white pictures on thick, tan paper are eye-catching in their graphic qualities. Ultimately, the art outshines the simple text, which is told in a cumulative rhyme that occasionally falters in its cadence. Despite this quibble, the picture book is a visual feast for readers as it depicts the gluttonous, lazy jackal who doesn't want to hunt for his food and instead tricks a succession of animals into becoming his meal. When he is quite literally full-to-bursting, the picture depicts all of the animals he's eaten within his "huge balloon" of a tummy. Mistakenly thinking that some water will help him, he drinks from a river--until "BLAMM! his poor tummy finally gave up…and BURST." The animals tumble forth, alive and well, leaving jackal "as thin as a whip" and in search of a tailor bird to sew him up. Itself hand-sewn and bound (as well as -printed, as the ink smell wafting from the pages attests), this handsome volume is an art object in itself. Though the story will feel familiar to Western readers, its fresh visual expression sets it far apart. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788192317144
Publisher:
Tara Books
Publication date:
10/15/2013
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 12.10(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author


Originally from Datasooti village in Rajasthan, India, Meena artist Sunita was taught to paint by her mother and elder sister. She now lives in the city of Sawai Madhopur in Rajasthan with her husband and two children. Meena Art is one of the most ancient tribal art forms in India. Passed on from mother to daughter through the generations, it is always the women of the Meena tribe who paint in white onto the brown mud walls and floors of the village.

A highly original and creative voice in contemporary Indian publishing, and the founder of Tara Books, Gita Wolf is known for her interest in exploring and experimenting with the form of the book. She has written over twenty books for children and adults, many of which have been translated into multiple languages and recognized internationally.

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