God after Metaphysics: A Theological Aesthetic

God after Metaphysics: A Theological Aesthetic

by John Panteleimon Manoussakis
     
 

While philosophy believes it is impossible to have an experience of God
without the senses, theology claims that such an experience is possible, though
potentially idolatrous. In this engagingly creative book, John Panteleimon
Manoussakis ends the impasse by proposing an aesthetic allowing for a sensuous
experience of God that is not subordinated to

Overview

While philosophy believes it is impossible to have an experience of God
without the senses, theology claims that such an experience is possible, though
potentially idolatrous. In this engagingly creative book, John Panteleimon
Manoussakis ends the impasse by proposing an aesthetic allowing for a sensuous
experience of God that is not subordinated to imposed categories or concepts.
Manoussakis draws upon the theological traditions of the Eastern Church, including
patristic and liturgical resources, to build a theological aesthetic founded on the
inverted gaze of icons, the augmented language of hymns, and the reciprocity of
touch. Manoussakis explores how a relational interpretation of being develops a
fuller and more meaningful view of the phenomenology of religious experience beyond
metaphysics and onto-theology.

Editorial Reviews

Choice

"... [A] solid contribution to the growing literature in continental philosophy of religion.... Recommended." —Choice

Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory
... [a] combined ability to revitalize traditional sources and to make everyday phenomena glimmer under its examination, God after Metaphysics is sure to provoke both debate and wonder for those interested in continental philosophy of religion.—Wilson Dickinson, Dept Religion at Syracuse University, Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory, vol. 9 no. 3 (Fall 2008)

— Wilson Dickinson, Dept Religion at SyracuseUniversity

Religious Studies Review
"... Manoussakis's book frames some interesting questions for philosophical theology. His use of Eastern theology as a complement to continental philosophy of religion is adroit and adds to his unique argument." —Forrest Clingerman, Ohio Northern University, Religious Studies Review, Vol. 34, 4 Nov, 2008

— Forrest Clingerman, Ohio Northern University

Reviews in Religion and Theology
"Manoussakis offers brilliant examples of how phenomenology fosters a deeper understanding of the essentially interpersonal dimension of human existence and an encounter with the divine.... the reader will find it hard to deny that phenomenology, insofar as neatly compliments classical metaphysics, is a welcome companion on the theological journey." —Daniel B. Gallagher, Sacred Heart Major Seminary, Reviews in Religion and Theology, Vol. 16, 1 December 2008

— Daniel B. Gallagher, Sacred Heart Major Seminary

Church And Postmodern Culture
Manoussakis makes a solid contribution to the growing literature in continental philosophy of religion. Like most works in the field, it is really more of an essay than a scholarly monograph. While the author offers a creative and provocative riff on the conditions of possibility for an "experience" of God, the discussion is neither located within nor accountable to existing secondary literature on the problem (glaringly absent is any engagement with David Bentley Hart's 2003 book, The Beauty of the Infinite). As a result, he sometimes repeats moves that have already been made by others (the "incarnational" move has been made by Jean-Luc Marion, myself, and others), or fails to respond to challenges to his model in the existing literature (e.g., regarding the persistent binary logic he assumes). However, Manoussakis, like Marion before him, helpfully engages the substantive claims of patristic resources, particularly the Eastern fathers. But he continues to be haunted by a penchant for supposed philosophical neutrality insofar as he seeks to unhook these theological resources from "their doctrinal authority"—as if philosophy doesn't admit all kinds of other extra-philosophical "authorities." Nevertheless, the book repays careful, critical reading.church and postmodern culture, 6/9/10
University of Notre Dame Kevin Hart

"Elegant and incisive, God after Metaphysics engages the 'theological turn' of contemporary phenomenology at a deeper, richer, and more satisfying level than many recent books. Manoussakis is entirely right to stress the importance of what it means to be 'n relations with God' and to see this as essential to theology today. Well grounded in patristics, Manoussakis shows us that the future of theology and its past are not in contradiction, and must be thought together." —Kevin Hart, University of Notre Dame

Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory - Wilson Dickinson

"... [a] combined ability to revitalize traditional sources and to make everyday
phenomena glimmer under its examination, God after Metaphysics is sure to
provoke both debate and wonder for those interested in continental philosophy
of religion." —Wilson Dickinson, Dept Religion at Syracuse
University, Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory, vol. 9 no. 3 (Fall 2008)

Religious Studies Review - Forrest Clingerman

"... for those whose research engages continental philosophy, Manoussakis’s
book frames some interesting questions for philosophical theology. His use of Eastern theology as a complement to continental philosophy of religion is adroit and adds to his unique argument." —Forrest Clingerman, Ohio Northern University, Religious Studies Review, Vol. 34, 4, December 2008

Kevin Hart

"Elegant and incisive, God after Metaphysics engages the ‘theological turn’ of contemporary phenomenology at a deeper, richer, and more satisfying level than many recent books. Manoussakis is entirely right to stress the importance of what it means to be ‘in relations with God’ and to see this as essential to theology today. Well grounded in patristics, Manoussakis shows us that the future of theology and its past are not in contradiction, and must be thought together." —Kevin Hart, University of Notre Dame

From the Publisher

"I have not seen anything in breadth, importance, and intensity like [Manoussakis’s] conception of God after metaphysics in all the years I have been teaching at the Sorbonne and the University of Chicago! —Jea" —Luc Marion

Reviews in Religion and Theology - Daniel B. Gallagher

"Manoussakis offers brilliant examples of how phenomenology fosters a deeper understanding of the essentially interpersonal dimension of human existence and an encounter with the divine.... the reader will find it hard to deny that phenomenology, insofar as neatly compliments classical metaphysics, is a welcome companion on the theological journey." —Daniel B. Gallagher, Sacred Heart Major Seminary, Reviews in Religion and Theology, Vol. 16, 1 December 2008

church and postmodern culture

Manoussakis makes a solid contribution to the growing literature in continental philosophy of religion. Like most works in the field, it is really more of an essay than a scholarly monograph. While the author offers a creative and provocative riff on the conditions of possibility for an "experience" of God, the discussion is neither located within nor accountable to existing secondary literature on the problem (glaringly absent is any engagement with David Bentley Hart's 2003 book, The Beauty of the Infinite). As a result, he sometimes repeats moves that have already been made by others (the "incarnational" move has been made by Jean-Luc Marion, myself, and others), or fails to respond to challenges to his model in the existing literature (e.g., regarding the persistent binary logic he assumes). However, Manoussakis, like Marion before him, helpfully engages the substantive claims of patristic resources, particularly the Eastern fathers. But he continues to be haunted by a penchant for supposed philosophical neutrality insofar as he seeks to unhook these theological resources from "their doctrinal authority"--as if philosophy doesn't admit all kinds of other extra-philosophical "authorities." Nevertheless, the book repays careful, critical reading.church and postmodern culture, 6/9/10

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780253116949
Publisher:
Indiana University Press
Publication date:
05/23/2007
Series:
Indiana Series in the Philosophy of Religion
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
232
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

John Panteleimon Manoussakis teaches at Boston College and the American
College in Athens, Greece. He has edited (with Drew Hyland) Heidegger and the Greeks
(IUP, 2006) and published a translation of Heidegger's Sojourns.

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