El Dios que no entiendo: Reflexiones y preguntas difíciles acera de la fe [NOOK Book]

Overview

Dr. Chris Wright is International Director of the Langham Partnership International. He also serves as chair of the Lausanne Committee's Theology Working Group and chair of the Theological Resource Panel of TEAR Fund, a leading Christian relief and development charity. He has written several books, including Living as the People of God (An Eye for an Eye in the US), God's People in God's Land, Knowing Jesus through the Old Testament, Walking in the Ways of the Lord, Deuteronomy in the New International Biblical ...
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El Dios que no entiendo: Reflexiones y preguntas difíciles acera de la fe

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Overview

Dr. Chris Wright is International Director of the Langham Partnership International. He also serves as chair of the Lausanne Committee's Theology Working Group and chair of the Theological Resource Panel of TEAR Fund, a leading Christian relief and development charity. He has written several books, including Living as the People of God (An Eye for an Eye in the US), God's People in God's Land, Knowing Jesus through the Old Testament, Walking in the Ways of the Lord, Deuteronomy in the New International Biblical Commentary, The Message of Ezekiel in the Bible Speaks Today series, Old Testament Ethics for the People of God, and The Mission of God. Chris and his wife, Liz, have four adult children and six grandchildren.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780829782370
  • Publisher: Vida
  • Publication date: 12/21/2010
  • Language: Spanish
  • Sold by: Zondervan Publishing
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Dr. Christopher J. H. Wright is International Director of the Langham Partnership International. He also serves as chair of the Lausanne Movement's Theology Working Group and chair of the Theological Resource Panel of TEAR Fund, a leading Christian relief and development charity. He has written several books, including Living as the People of God (An Eye for an Eye in the US), God's People in God's Land, Knowing Jesus through the Old Testament, Walking in the Ways of the Lord, Deuteronomy in the New International Biblical Commentary, The Message of Ezekiel in the Bible Speaks Today series, Old Testament Ethics for the People of God, The Mission of God, and The God I Don't Understand. Chris and his wife, Liz, have four adult children and six grandchildren.

Christopher J. H. Wright es director internacional de Langham Partnership International, donde tomo el cargo que ocupo John R. W. Stott durante treinta anos. Tambien sirve como presidente de la junta directiva del Grupo de Trabajadores del Comite Teologico Lausana y del Panel de recursos teologicos del fondo TEAR, una fundacion lider en la ayuda para cristianos y desarrollo caritativo. Es autor de un sinnumero de libros, incluyendo Conociendo a Jesus a traves del Antiguo Testamento, etica del Antiguo Testamento para log hijos de Dios, y el galardonado La Mision de Dios. Chris y su esposa, Luz, tienen cuatro hijos y cinco nietos.
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 6 of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 13, 2009

    Wright considers some "tough questions" within Christianity

    Christopher Wright is a prominent light these days in the evangelical Christian world both as a writer and a leader. He has given papers and presentations to the Evangelical Theological Society and the Society of Biblical Literature recently. According to the book blurb, Wright serves as International Director of the Langham Partnership International (a prominent world missions/evangelism organization founded by John R. W. Stott) and has served as chair of the Lausanne Committee's Theology Working Group (Lausanne Committee for World Evangelism). <BR/><BR/> He has written several books that have been appreciated by the evangelical world. Books on my shelf which I do recommend are: The Mission of God: Unlocking the Bible's Grand Narrative; Knowing Jesus Through the Old Testament; Knowing the Holy Spirit Through the Old Testament; The Message of Ezekiel: A New Heart and a New Spirit; and a commentary on Deuteronomy in the New International Bible Commentary Series.<BR/><BR/> In this particular work, Wright pastorally approaches some of the "tough questions" persons may have as they read through the Bible. The title and the opening pages clearly show that God is not always easily understandable by the seasoned Bible scholar and pastor, so the "average pew sitter" should not be frustrated or overwhelmed when he may encounter difficulties, implying to the reader "you are not alone." Wright does make it a point to remind, however, that, though one may not understand God and his actions fully, yet he is worthy of appreciation, worship, and full trust. "[T]o know God, to love and trust him with all one's heart and soul and strength, is not the same as to understand God in all his ways" (13). After all, he is God; we are not.<BR/><BR/> Wright divided his work into four major sections: What about Evil and Suffering? What about the Canaanites? What about the Cross? and, What about the End of the World? In the first section on evil and suffering, Wright dealt with the question every individual faces (from whence and why evil?) in three chapters, discussing the mystery, offence, and defeat of evil. In the second section on the Canaanites, the author offered a consideration of "three dead ends" and "three frameworks" as he wrestled with God's punishment of the Canaanites. Wright focused on the fact that evil impacts God also as he treated Christ's cross work in section three, explaining the why and how of Jesus' atoning death. Last, he considered where we all are headed along with the ultimate remedy to evil and sin, ending with some excellent encouraging remarks for the Christian to persevere. At the back of the book, the interested reader will find a very useful section for further reading organized around the four section topics. This section alone is worth the price of the book.<BR/><BR/> This book is recommended for those who have never considered these tough questions of life or who are only beginning to ask these questions. Wright offers a pastoral encouragement to understand evil and its impact on you and your world, an encouragement to understand the God who does control his universe and will bring it to a glorious positive conclusion, and an encouragement to trust in him whose actions are not always understandable. My only question relates to the section on the Canaanites. This section seems overlong but may well be helpful for some.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 25, 2009

    "The God I Don't Understand" Is An Effective Blend of Education and Inspiration

    The God I Don¿t Understand in the second book I¿ve read by Christopher Wright. (The other being "Knowing the Holy Spirit in the Old Testament.") His approach in both works is wholly authentic. He is an academic. However, he doesn¿t approach the biblical text as if the scholarly and inspirational pursuits of God¿s written word are mutual exclusives. You will be educated and at the same time inspired. He addresses difficult issues (such as the existence of evil and the ordained violence in the Old Testament and at the cross), providing an expanded biblical and historical context on all of them. The questions still remain, however. What he does leave the reader with is a desire not to look back and wonder why, but to look forward and ask what ¿ what can I do for my God to prepare for the Lord¿s return.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 7, 2009

    Beyond our understanding but not beyond our faith, praise, and worship

    If you were to survey every classroom, church and home asking if anyone understood God, inevitably there wouldn't be a soul who would make that claim. It is from this common ground that The God I Don't Understand takes root. By digging into the bible, extracting the truths embedded in the scriptures, Christopher H. Wright tackles the tough questions of faith with loaded evidence. Clearly written by a biblical scholar and teacher, this book brings into focus the God we come to know and understand according to the scriptures. It points to the God who reveals enough of Himself to justify our trust and worship even though there will always be things about Him we can't comprehend. It piles up a hefty stack of credible reasons to believe while leaving plenty of room to humbly accept and appreciate the mystery, confusion and questions that linger. Ironically, by investigating the questions that baffle and bewilder, a pathway to greater understanding opens up.

    Conveniently divided into four sections of reflection: What about Evil and Suffering?, What about the Canaanites?, What about the Cross?, and What about the End of the World?, The God I Don't Understand easily converts into an enriching individual or group bible study. If you've ever wanted to come closer to the God you love but don't always understand, this book is well worth the read. No doubt about it.

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  • Posted February 2, 2009

    Anyone who has ever grappled with the existence of evil and suffering, the mystery of the end of the word, the crucifixion of Jesus, or the destruction of the Canaanites in Joshua will find Wright┬┐s book a welcome voice of reason & faith.

    The God i Don¿t Understand balances the limits of what can be understood about four problematic areas¿1) evil and suffering, 2) Canaanites in the book of Joshua, 3) the crucifixion of Jesus, and 4) the end of the world. Three chapters address each problematic area except for the destruction of the Canaanites in the book of Joshua in which there are only two chapters. Whereas the lack of human understanding in the areas of evil and suffering and the end of the world arise from the human experience and contemplation, the problems with God¿s response to the Canaanites in the book of Joshua and the crucifixion of Jesus emerge from reading the Scriptural accounts. <BR/><BR/>The goal of this book as stated by Wright is to `face up to the limitations of our understanding and to acknowledge the pain and grief this can often cause¿ but also to affirm that `God is ultimately in charge and I can trust him to put things right¿ (23).<BR/><BR/>The tone of this book is pastoral and personal. The integration of the author¿s own faith in the Jesus of Nazareth and his admissions of understanding and lack thereof provides clear direction for `secure¿ Christians who struggle with not totally understanding troublesome aspects concerning the ways of God.<BR/><BR/>Throughout the entire book, Wright¿s exploration of these four troublesome areas contains a balance of his candid attempt to provide answers to thorny questions where Scripture provides assistance and his lack of answers for other questions where mystery prevails over understanding. As an example of the latter, the first chapter, `The Mystery of Evil,¿ concludes with Wright¿s admission that evil does not make sense to any human because sense belongs in the realm of rationality¿that part of the good creation of God and God¿s image in humans. He argues that sense and evil are therefore mutually exclusive. As an example of former, in the second chapter, `The Offence of Evil,¿ Wright surmises that Christians are allowed (even encouraged!) to lament, protest, and be angry at the offensiveness of evil while retaining their trust in God.<BR/><BR/>Wright¿s inquiries into these four areas provide a wonderful discussion partner for anyone (Christian or non-Christian) who grapples with these prickly issues. Wright¿s stance¿understanding what is possible and acknowledging what is not comprehensible from a faith perspective¿is refreshing and welcome in this ongoing debate regarding things that humans do not understand about God that result in anger, puzzlement, gratitude, or hope.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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