God, the Devil, and Harry Potter: A Christian Minister's Defense of the Beloved Novels / Edition 1

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Overview

“The Potter stories, far from being ‘wicked’ or ‘Satanic,’ ... are in fact narratives of robust faith and morality ...

“What Ms. Rowling has furnished us, besides what the Brits call ‘a good read,’ and a whopping good one, ... is a modern interpretation of the gospel, the wonderful news that ‘God was in Christ, reconciling the world to himself’ and making sure that the goodness of creation would never be obliterated by the forces of darkness and evil.”

Since their first publication, J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter novels have brought joy to children and adults alike. Many conservative Christians in the United States, however, have decried the books as wicked, as preaching witchcraft and the occult, and as glamorizing dishonesty. A minister in New Mexico held a “holy bonfire” on the Sunday after Christmas 2001, at which he publicly torched the Potter books, declaring them “an abomination to God and to me.”

John Killinger, a Congregationalist minister and an academic in the field of contemporary literature, beautifully demolishes the objections of right-wing Christians to this bestselling children’s series. He compellingly argues that, far from corrupting children’s morals, the Potter stories actually influence young readers to follow the teachings of Jesus. He cites passage after passage to illustrate how the world of Harry Potter would be inconceivable apart from the strictures of Judeo-Christian theology and the way human existence should be approached by every follower of Jesus. Additionally, he reflects on the possibility that Harry Potter, like Dostoevsky’s Prince Myshkin and others, is a witting or unwitting Christ figure who actually battles the forces of darkness for the souls of the faithful.

All through this extraordinarily well-written, compelling, and very entertaining little book, the author points out that stories like this are worth more than any sermon toward producing people who truly follow the lessons of Jesus.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312308711
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 4/5/2004
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 208
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.28 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

John Killinger, who holds doctorates in both theology and literature, has taught courses in the theological aspects of contemporary literature at Vanderbilt University, the University of Chicago, City College of New York, and Stamford University. An ordained clergyman, he has been a minister in parishes in Virginia and California, and presently serves as the minister of the Little Stone Church, a resort parish on Mackinac Island, Michigan. Among his many publications are several books in the field of literary criticism, including Hemingway and the Dead Gods and The Failure of Theology in Modern Literature. He has also written two novels, Jessie and The Night Jessie Sang at the Opry, which feature Christ as a woman in modern times.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1
1. Mysterious Births and Miraculous Childhoods 15
2. The Struggle Between Good and Evil 35
3. The Game of Life 62
4. The Magical, Mystical World 100
5. Of Ghosts and Goblins and the Life After Death 126
6. And Now Abideth Faith, Hope, and Love 158
About the Author 187
Notes 189
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Reading Group Guide

About the Book: "The Potter stories, far from being 'wicked' or 'Satanic,' ... are in fact narratives of robust faith and morality ...

"What Ms. Rowling has furnished us, besides what the Brits call 'a good read,' and a whopping good one, ... is a modern interpretation of the gospel, the wonderful news that 'God was in Christ, reconciling the world to himself' and making sure that the goodness of creation would never be obliterated by the forces of darkness and evil."

Since their first publication, J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter novels have brought joy to children and adults alike. Many conservative Christians in the United States, however, have decried the books as wicked, as preaching witchcraft and the occult, and as glamorizing dishonesty. A minister in New Mexico held a "holy bonfire" on the Sunday after Christmas 2001, at which he publicly torched the Potter books, declaring them "an abomination to God and to me."

John Killinger, a Congregationalist minister and an academic in the field of contemporary literature, beautifully demolishes the objections of right-wing Christians to this bestselling children's series. He compellingly argues that, far from corrupting children's morals, the Potter stories actually influence young readers to follow the teachings of Jesus. He cites passage after passage to illustrate how the world of Harry Potter would be inconceivable apart from the strictures of Judeo-Christian theology and the way human existence should be approached by every follower of Jesus. Additionally, he reflects on the possibility that Harry Potter, like Dostoevsky's Prince Myshkin and others, is a witting or unwitting Christ figure who actually battles the forces of darkness for the souls of the faithful.

All through this extraordinarily well-written, compelling, and very entertaining little book, the author points out that stories like this are worth more than any sermon toward producing people who truly follow the lessons of Jesus.

Review: "At last! A sensible Christian reading of Harry Potter. ... Remember, even Jesus himself was accused of necromancy by his enemies!" --Harvey Cox, Victor S. Thomas Professor of Divinity, Harvard Divinity School, author of Common Prayers: Faith, Family, and a Christian's Journey Through the Jewish Year

"A great read ... A wonderful antidote to some of the sheer silliness and malice of other religious commentators on the Potter books." --Joseph C. Hough, Jr., President, Union Theological Seminary, New York

"Augustine said that Christian truth is ever ancient and ever new. John Killinger has placed Christian truth in a significant new setting, the struggle of good and evil in the Harry Potter novels. His book is a must-read for all who seek to understand these best-selling novels and how the Gospel intersects with them. Creativity abounds, not just in Rowling's novels, but also in Killinger's analysis." --Dr. William B. Oden, resident bishop of The United Methodist Church, Dallas, Texas

"John Killinger brings the mind of a theologian and the heart of a writer to the task of successfully uncovering deep Christian values and traditions in the Harry Potter stories. For fans of Harry Potter, Killinger's scholarship can only deepen their enthusiasm. For Harry Potter's naysayers, Dr. Killinger's book adds convincing new arguments to the discussion." ---Robert D. Black, executive producer of 30 Good Minutes and president of Chicago Sunday Evening Club

"It is always such a joy to read a book written by John Killinger. He is a breath of fresh air in a world of oppressive conservatism which sees evil in so many good things. His latest book, God, the Devil, and Harry Potter: A Christian Minister's Defense of the Beloved Novels, is a delightfully playful and enjoyable diagnosis of the popular Harry Potter series. I am sure others will find the same refreshing experience as I did in this wonderful defense of Harry Potter against the modern-day Inquisition." --Fr. Joseph F. Girzone, author of the Joshua series and Trinity: A New Living Spirituality

Discussion Questions:

Suggestions for use: If the book is to be discussed in one or two sessions, concentrate on the questions marked by an asterisk. If it is to be discussed in several sessions, most or all of the questions can be addressed. In the latter case, the leader might wish to add to the introductory questions some remarks about J. K. Rowling herself, as gleaned from Lindsey Fraser (ed.), Conversations with J. K. Rowling (Scholastic Press, 2001), Marc Shapiro, J. K. Rowling: The Wizard Behind Harry Potter (St. Martin's Griffin, 2001), or material taken from Harry Potter Internet sites. Alternatively, the leader might wish to acquire and show one of the video interviews with Rowling, such as the one by Leslie Stahl on CBS-60 Minutes.

The Introduction

1. What factors do you think account for the enormous popularity of the Harry Potter stories? Can you think of any other books that have enjoyed such a wild reception or created such a loyal following? If so, are there any parallels between them and J. K. Rowling's novels?

2. The author suggests that children like the Harry Potter novels because they have a simple, direct, good-versus-evil understanding of life, similar to that found in comic books, while adults often have a more blurred and complicated vision of life. Do you agree or disagree with this? Why?

3. The faculty and students at Hogwarts School observe Halloween, Christmas, and Easter, all of which have their origins in Christian history; but, apart from the singing of Christmas carols, there is very little in the Potter stories to connect them with religious or theological substance. Would you have been happier if J. K. Rowling had established a closer connection, or do think this is fairly normal for most schools today?

Chapter One: Mysterious Births and Miraculous Childhoods

1. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone opens with a lot of fanfare about Harry's arrival as a baby at the home of his foster parents, Vernon and Petunia Dursley. Were you entranced or put off by all the hoopla over a child with a jagged mark on his forehead from an earlier encounter with Lord Voldemort? Elaborate.

*2. The author points out that Dumbledore's name can mean a cockchafer or a beetle and that it is possible to identify him with Egyptian religious symbolism. He also observes that Minerva McGonagall's catlike form is reminiscent of the Egyptian goddess Bast, who sat like a cat keeping watch over the night. If J. K. Rowling intended to write a Christian story, why might she introduce Egyptian mythology almost at the beginning of it? Can you think of any similar attempts in the Gospels themselves to create a sense of universalism at the birth of Jesus?

3. Review the information the author provides about the possible symbolism of the lightning bolt on young Harry Potter's forehead. Do you agree that the mark could be symbolic of Yahweh, the God of the Hebrew religion? Might it also be related to Zeus or Thor, gods whose emblem was the thunderbolt?

4. Are you familiar with "Keeping Up Appearances," the British TV comedy whose protagonists Hyacinth and Richard Bucket (pronounced boo-KAY) the author thinks may have been the models for the Dursleys? Would this connection seem to you frivolous, if it were true, or could it have significance in some serious way? Explain.

*5. In support of his thesis that J. K. Rowling's writing "is not only dependent on the Christian understanding of life and the universe but actually grows out of that understanding and would have been unthinkable without it," the author argues that Harry Potter is a young Christ-figure whose early life is reminiscent of Jesus' childhood. Can you recall some of the parallels he mentions? Do you think Rowling had these in mind as she created her young wizard?

6. The author sees special significance in the Sorting Hat's ambivalence about whether to place Harry Potter in Slytherin House or in Gryffindor House, where he himself elects to go. Do you think the ambivalence symbolizes Harry's relationship to both the darker and lighter elements of life, inasmuch as Slytherin House was founded by Salazar Slytherin and has the serpent as its emblem, while Gryffindor House has the noble lion as its emblem?

7. Owls are often thought to be the most "human" of birds, at the same time that they have a connection to the occult and mysterious. Do you find Rowling's use of them as messengers for the witches and wizards especially fitting in the world of Harry Potter and his friends? Why or why not? Does their appearance on the day of Harry's deliverance to the Dursley household enhance the sense of Harry's importance to the world at large?

Chapter Two: The Struggle Between Good and Evil

*1. The author says there has been "only one great plot engine for all fiction since the coming of Christ, and that is the struggle of good to overcome evil." Is this true in your experience of literature? Recall some of the most important stories you know and test your response on them.

2. The author offers a parenthetical remark about the possibility that Harry Potter's lying in a coma for three days after his battle with Professor Quirrell/Lord Voldemort in Sorcerer's Stone could be an allusion to Christ's three days in the tomb. Do you find any merit in this suggestion? Would such a conclusion reinforce the idea that Harry is a Christ-figure?

3. Reread Matthew 13:24-30, Jesus' parable about the wheat and the weeds. Does it express your own experience of the mixture of good and evil in the world? Is the passage well applied to such a mixture in the Harry Potter stories?

4. Recount the four kinds of evil the author says were encountered by Jesus, and then the ways in which Harry Potter similarly encountered them. Are the parallels valid? Which kind of evil do you think looms most prominently in the four Harry Potter novels we now have?

5. Do Dobby and the house-elves we meet in Chamber of Secrets and Goblet of Fire remind you of any group or groups of people in our own social history? How? Do you admire Hermione for championing them? Is Harry too lackadaisical about their situation? Why or why not?

6. The Basilisk, or great serpent, in Chamber of Secrets reminds us of which being or character in the Bible? Do you think Rowling intends her readers to see a connection between them? Why?

*7. Do you see any parallelism between Harry's descending to the chamber of the Basilisk to save Ginny Weasley and Christ's coming to earth and undergoing crucifixion for the souls of others? Is there Christian symbolism in Harry's plunging a sword, "like St. George," as the author says, into the mouth of the Basilisk?

*8. In the process of killing the Basilisk, Harry is wounded and appears to be dying. But he is revived by Fawkes, Dumbledore's phoenix, whose tears fall into Harry's wound and heal him. The phoenix has always been a symbol of resurrection in Christian circles. Is it too much to assume that J. K. Rowling intended a connection? Discuss.

9. Are the hideous dementors in Prisoner of Azkaban fitting representations of the depression we all experience from time to time? What do you think about the methods used to avoid or overpower them? Have you yourself ever employed the memories of loved ones to drive away depressing thoughts?

10. Are you familiar with Christian bestiaries, which were popular in the Middle Ages as reminders of God's power over all creation? If you were designing a bestiary for use today, what beasts would you include? Can you see how their existence, even in imagination, bespeaks the glory of God?

11. Does the Triwizard Tournament in Goblet of Fire reflect the international mania for sports in our time? St. Paul, on more than one occasion, used athletic metaphors to encourage his readers to live the Christian life. Do you see anything "Christian" about the Triwizard Tournament or what happened in it?

12. The author observes again, near the end of this chapter, the tangled nature of good and evil. Professors Snape and Karkaroff, who were once marked by Lord Voldemort, now resist him, while Barty Crouch, Sr., an ordinarily just and scrupulous man, becomes his tool. Harry Potter's own blood is a necessary ingredient in the restoration of Voldemort to his old power. Are good and evil this impossible to separate in the world? If so, what is our hope of salvation?

Chapter Three: The Game of Life

*1. Harry Potter is a seeker on the Gryffindor Quidditch team. As the author suggests, this name is often applied today to "persons whose concern for true spirituality leads them from religion to religion and philosophy to philosophy . . . always searching for the essence of a higher humanity." Are you sympathetic to such seekers or do you believe they should settle for a single religious viewpoint? Why?

2. Do you agree with the author's assessment that Harry Potter is a modest, self-effacing hero and that this is part of the reason for his popularity with readers? What was your own response to the self-congratulatory character of Professor Gilderoy Lockhart in Chamber of Secrets? Does Harry's humility help to connect him with the person of Jesus–especially the Jesus of the synoptic Gospels?

*3. Conservative critics often find fault with Harry, Ron, Hermione, and Neville for fudging the truth or disobeying rules when it suits them. Do you personally find this objectionable in them? Does it in any way vitiate the possibility of Harry's being a Christ-figure?

4. In this chapter, the author refers to occasions when Harry disregards personal danger and inconvenience to go to the aid of others. Is this a governing factor in his overall behavior? Do you think Rowling saw it as relating Harry to Christ, or is it merely a coincidence?

5. In the gauntlet of trials that constitute the Triwizard Tournament, Harry risks the championship to help others. Is this a quality found in all heroes or is Rowling consciously relating Harry to Christ? Is it your opinion that the Christian ideal of love and fair play has influenced the entire heroic tradition in Western literature?

6. Reread the part of this chapter in which the author likens Hermione's campaign for "elf rights" to the battle for civil rights in America. Do you think Rowling consciously fashioned Hermione's "cause" after the civil rights struggle? Would it have been too much of a giveaway of Harry Potter's character to have made him the champion of "elf rights"? In the tradition of Christ's followers, have women often been the real defenders of human rights?

*7. Reread the quotation from Jaroslav Pelikan's Jesus Through the Centuries. Do you agree that Harry repeatedly risks his life for others in a Christlike manner? Explain.

8. When Ron willingly sacrifices himself for the others in the living chess game, he appears to have caught the spirit of heroism and self-immolation in Harry Potter. Can you think of Christian apostles or saints who imitated Jesus in a similar fashion?

9. Do you agree with the author that Harry's descent into the chamber of secrets is reminiscent of Jesus' supposed descent into hell during the time between his crucifixion and resurrection? Do you think J. K. Rowling was aware of a possible relationship between the two events?

*10. In Goblet of Fire, which has the Triwizard Tournament as its centerpiece, Rowling enlarges the stage of the earlier novels to include Europeans. The result is an interesting juxtaposition of international viewpoints and vocabularies. Do you see this as a conscious attempt on Rowling's part to focus on the universal nature of good and evil, and on Harry's part in a world-wide drama? Are religion and ethics, as well as technology and economics, becoming more globalized today? Explain.

11. Reread 1 John 4:7-12, about love, and the passage from Sorcerer's Stone in which Dumbledore tells Harry Potter, "If there is one thing Voldemort cannot understand, it is love." Is this an effective reminder of the way Rowling views Dumbledore, Harry, and others as related to God and love, while Voldemore and his followers are consigned to evil and lovelessness? Discuss.

12. Do you agree with J. K. Rowling that we are the products of the choices we make? Can you expound on this idea, employing as illustrations the choices made by various characters in her novels? The author of God, the Devil, and Harry Potter says that the good life must be won again and again, and is never "an assumable possession." Do you agree with this? Explain.

Chapter Four: The Magical, Mystical World

1. Recall some of your favorite tricks, enchanted objects, and mechanical gadgets in the Harry Potter stories. Do you agree with conservative critics who say that such things are "unreal" and therefore harmful to children who read about them?

2. The author lists many of the strange and unusual occurrences in the Bible. Is it harmful, in your opinion, for children to study these in Sunday school?

3. Rowling says she has never heard a child say that she has inspired them to become a witch or a wizard, yet her critics say that she glamorizes witchcraft and wizardry. Do you personally think children have difficulty distinguishing between fantasy and reality, and that Rowling's books are a danger to their young psyches?

4. The author mentions some of the spells or curses used in the Harry Potter stories. Perhaps you can remember others. Are such spells and curses examples of wish-fulfillment–of what we'd like to do to other persons? If so, do you believe it is healthy for children to read about them?

*5. The author suggests that Lord Voldemort's pronouncing a Cruciatus Curse on Harry Potter in Goblet of Fire is further evidence of Harry's being a Christ-figure. Do you agree? Is his suffering from this spell a convincing description of how a person might feel when being crucified?

6. Reread the paragraphs in this chapter about Lawrence LeShan's The Medium, the Mystic, and the Physicist. Do you believe there are many experiences that point to the existence of a transcendent or paranormal dimension of life? Have you had such experiences? Does Rowling help to restore a sense of wonder to ordinary existence by reminding us of this other dimension?

Chapter Five: Of Ghosts and Goblins and the Life After Death

1. Do you agree with the author that most people today generally avoid thoughts of death and life after death as much as possible? What are some reasons for such an avoidance? Does the peopling of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry with ghosts, goblins, and poltergeists make it seem unreal to you, or does it add an important dimension to the stories?

2. Have you or an acquaintance had an experience with ghosts or apparitions of any kind? Can you describe it? Is it more or less real than the experiences of Harry and his friends at Hogwarts?

3. Bishop James Pike, author of The Other Side, was considered delusional and heretical when he talked of contacting his dead son. Do you personally believe there can be any contact between the living and the dead? Explain.

4. Some scientists following Einstein believe that time and space are so curved that, if we only knew how, we might actually step into the past or the future. In Prisoner of Azkaban, Hermione's Time-Turner permits her and her friends to reverse the flow of time. Do you believe there are more wonders and mysteries about time and space than we ordinarily admit or understand?

5. The author draws a connection between people's praying to dead saints and Moaning Myrtle's helping Harry in Chamber of Secrets and Goblet of Fire. Do you yourself believe the dead can possibly influence events among the living? Can you cite an experience you or someone else has had of such an occasion?

6. Harry's father, James, becomes his guardian spirit in the form of a great stag that appears when Harry pronounces the words "Expecto patronum." Have you ever felt that you had a guardian angel of some kind? Please share.

7. The idea of a personal resurrection has always been a strong motif in Christian thought. Do you think J. K. Rowling has drawn on this idea by having Harry's parents return to aid him in his battle against Voldemort?

8. Are the boggarts and dementors in the Harry Potter novels apt reminders of the power of darkness and depression in our lives? How do you control them in your own life? Do you think the antidotes recommended in Prisoner of Azkaban are effective deterrents?

Chapter Six: And Now Abideth Faith, Hope, and Love

1. Do you agree with the author that the verse from 1 Corinthians, "And now abideth faith, hope, and love, these three; but the greatest of these is love," can be regarded as a brief creedal statement? And do the Potter novels really put us in touch with all three?

2. Are you in accord with psychiatrist Rollo May's statement that people today greatly miss a sense of the numinous or transcendental in their existence? Why is this? How do the Harry Potter stories help to remind us of this other dimension?

3. The author reports the conversation of an adult who said that she enjoys the Rowling novels as much as a child–that she actually feels more youthful when she reads them. Can you imagine why this is so? Is Diane Ackerman's concept of "deep play" part of the reason?

4. C. J. Jung taught the notion of a "collective unconscious" or "racial memory," by which we are supposed to have vague recollections of ancient myths and stories. Do you think part of the extraordinary pull of J. K. Rowling's books stems from the fact that she blends so many allusions to classical stories with the overarching framework of the Christian faith? Would such an approach to world culture be psychologically and emotionally helpful to children today?

*5. Do you agree with the author that Albus Dumbledore is "almost like God presiding over the affairs of the faithful"? Can you give specific evidence of this?

6. Reread the section of Goblet of Fire (especially page 86 in the standard edition) in which Rowling satirizes bureaucracy. Is she an effective satirist? What in her own life do you imagine might have prepared her for creating such a scathing, light-hearted portrait of civil servants?

*7. Since September 11, 2001, there has been an unusual surge of interest in apocalypticism, or the revelation of so-called "last things." The author sees a connection between New Testament apocalypticism and the tone of Rowling's novels–particularly the fear engendered by the appearance of the Dark Mark in Goblet of Fire and the hope inspired by Harry Potter's survival of his initial encounter with Lord Voldemort. Harry, says the author, "is the eschatological figure of the novels, as Christ is of the Gospels, and all depends on him." Is this conclusion warranted?

8. As the author observes, Dumbledore and the good wizards desire a world of love and unity, while Voldemort and his followers specialize in terror and disruption. Would you say that this is the ultimate test of whether Rowling's is a Christian vision of life, or could the same be said as well for other religious views?

About the Author: John Killinger, who holds doctorates in both theology and literature, has taught courses in the theological aspects of contemporary literature at Vanderbilt University, the University of Chicago, City College of New York, and Stamford University. An ordained clergyman, he has been a minister in parishes in Virginia and California, and presently serves as the minister of the Little Stone Church, a resort parish on Mackinac Island, Michigan. Among his many publications are several books in the field of literary criticism, including Hemingway and the Dead Gods and The Failure of Theology in Modern Literature. He has also written two novels, Jessie and The Night Jessie Sang at the Opry, which feature Christ as a woman in modern times.

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Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 1, 2012

    Spells--translation

    I have actually not read this particular book, but a few years ago I read a book like it called (I think) Looking for God in Harry Potter. I remember one thing he said was that the spells are in Latin (for example "accio" is latin for "summon" and "crucio" means several things including "torment")--meaning they aren't just made up words or actual spells. I'm not sure how many people know that fact. (I have also read all the Harry Potter books, even been to a couple midnight releases (movies too) and am working on reading through them again because I CAN)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2004

    Finally! an author with sense

    I whole heartedly agree with the 8th grade reviewer from new york. I myself am a 13 year old catholic christian. I attend church weekly, go to catholic school, and read the Harry Potter books. And, yes, i have had no urges whatsoever to buy a wand and cast spells on those who displease me. I believe Mr. Killinger is awesome, and i fully plan on lending this book to a ton of people. I would also like to add that many people (including myself) have re-read the harry potter novels several times. And, no, it's not to get the spells correct. It's because they are fun, well-written novels by a talented author. So, thanks Mr. killinger, for lending the adults some faith in us younger set.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2004

    Harry Potter is great!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Finally, this book is so true and I am so glad that someone finally wrote it. Harry Potter is no bad, infact it is the best. I think if people want to know the truth then they should read this books and all the Harry Potter books. This book is right about everything concerning this issue and I recommned it ot anyone who wnats the truth about what to think in this very heated debate.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2003

    I love the books

    i am 14 and i love the books they are the best you get to go to his world and explore with him they are wonderful my brother who is 6 loves them i read them to him and he loves them ohhh and did i mention i am a very strong christian and so is my family and as i said we all love them, they are wonderful and the neat thing is my last name is Potter and well the people who think Harry Potter is filthy piece of you know what whatever( i have been an extra in the movie to so thats probably why i have this opinion, or however you spell it hehe) and to finish this note i love you people who gave harry potter a chance even thoe your relitives or perants or just friends did not approve. farewell!!!!! -Potter

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2003

    Thank You So very very Much!!

    I'm a christian and i love the Harry Potter books. I don't think these are a bad books just because it has witchcraft or any of that sort of things. I love the books because it sort of put things in a diffrent view on somethings some how. Some of my friends don't like Harry Potter but thats ok becuase they don't have to like it if they don't want to but am not going to stop reading them just people think that the books are a bad thing to read which they are not but i will respect there opinon about the books and i just won't read the books around them that all. The Harry Potter books do have to do with good and evil. it is sort of like Harry is like jesus and Voldemort is satan.I like the books not just becuase it has to do with good and evil but it give you an a really good imagenation for life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2003

    The consevitives are crazy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Harry Potter books are just a modern 'cops&robbers' good vs. evil. Yes there are some questioning things in these books,but through out time poeple have tryed to discredit others to put the spotlight on themselves by digging up any and everything they could that might sound bad and blow it rediculously out of proportion.I am 14 a skateboarder and a cristian,and like it or not I think the conservitives are crazy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2003

    Harry Potter, Not DEMONIC!!!

    I am a Christian, Iam 17 years old, and i read Harry Potter more than my school books. People believe Harry is satanic and demonic, but not once have i come accross anything to do with the devil. Harry's world is imaginitive, and not real, so why do people go the wrong way and make bad comments on something that doesnt exist? This book is to prove them wrong!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2003

    Thank you!

    I am tired of listening to people saying that Harry Potter is promoting whichcraft and the Devil. Mostly everyone who reads the series is doing it because they are exellent novels. Hardly anyone does because they want to do whichcraft. My best friend is a conservative Christian too, and loves the Harry Potter books and goes to church weekly. It is very possible to be a good chritian and still be a Harry Potter fan. It's not like after reading it we'll go out and start practicing whichcraft. Thank you for this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2003

    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU

    THANK YOU! I LOVE YOU! SOMEONE ACTUALLY ON OUR SIDE!! PLEASE GO TALK TO MR. ABANES

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2003

    Thank You

    Most people don't like Harry Potter because it supposedly is Santanist. Well I think it's good that a Christian is standing up and saying that's wrong. I'm only 14 and I'm a Christian and I've read the books eight times each and I've never come across anything that would was remotely related to the devil!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2003

    Its about time!

    Its about time a christian came to their senses. I prase this man. No child thinks that harry potter influences the devil or that thease spells are real. i should know. im a huge fan and im 13. ive read harry potter every since it first came out. this man it truly a god sent. its time ONE christian stopped saying that all harry potter is is evil and in my oppinion all of those christians are hipicrits. thank you so SO much for being on our side minister!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2002

    PW is right

    Publisher's Weekly pegged this book right. Nice try, but rather weak in logic. Bridger's book "The Spirituality of HP" from Doubleday might be a good start at a lower price. But for the most powerful analysis of the HP books as moral/Christian stories read "The Hidden Key To Harry Potter". Just released, this book is going to be a big hit with Potter fans in 2003. Very entertaining and fun to read, but also a substantial literary evaluation. Traces the meaning of latin words and names and the major themes of JK Rowling. As an added feature, Granger makes predictions about what will happen in the last three HP books.

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