A God Who Hates: The Courageous Woman Who Inflamed the Muslim World Speaks Out Against the Evils of Islam [NOOK Book]

Overview

From the front page of The New York Times to YouTube, Dr. Wafa Sultan has become a force radical Islam has to reckon with. For the first time, she tells her story and what she learned, first-hand, about radical Islam in A God Who Hates, a passionate memoir by an outspoken Arabic woman that is also a cautionary tale for the West. She grew up in Syria in a culture ruled by a god who hates women. “How can such a culture be anything but barbarous?”, Sultan asks. “It can’t”, she concludes “because any culture that ...

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A God Who Hates: The Courageous Woman Who Inflamed the Muslim World Speaks Out Against the Evils of Islam

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Overview

From the front page of The New York Times to YouTube, Dr. Wafa Sultan has become a force radical Islam has to reckon with. For the first time, she tells her story and what she learned, first-hand, about radical Islam in A God Who Hates, a passionate memoir by an outspoken Arabic woman that is also a cautionary tale for the West. She grew up in Syria in a culture ruled by a god who hates women. “How can such a culture be anything but barbarous?”, Sultan asks. “It can’t”, she concludes “because any culture that hates its women can’t love anything else.” She believes that the god who hates is waging a battle between modernity and barbarism, not a battle between religions. She also knows that it’s a battle radical Islam will lose. Condemned by some and praised by others for speaking out, Sultan wants everyone to understand the danger posed by A God Who Hates.


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Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
A Syrian-born psychiatrist argues that "Muslims hate their women . . . because their god does."In 2006, Sultan gave an interview on Al-Jazeera in which she condemned militant Islam as barbaric and predicted its eventual demise. The author writes that she received death threats in response, while Muslim moderates praised her candor. Her first book is a stew of insightful critique and questionable generalizations, informed by her bitter memories of her upbringing in Syria, where, she says, religion sanctioned the treatment of women as little better than dogs. Her psychiatrist's diagnosis is that Islam's birth in a harsh desert environment, where survival was a constant struggle, imbued its adherents with a primal, despairing anger that they've never discarded. She's not the first to argue that the refusal to separate church and state in Muslim countries is a fundamental reason for their political repression and poor living conditions. Nor can her criticism of misogyny in some of those countries be disputed. Yet she drops broad bombshells about Muslims that are sure to be highly controversial. Sultan criticizes Colin Powell because he sees nothing wrong with electing a Muslim president, even though "Islam is not just a religion: It is a political doctrine that imposes itself by force." Though she stresses that she has no "anti-Muslim prejudice," she adds that "Muslims...can be either good or bad, and the best among them do not act in accordance with the teachings of their religion." The author also claims that no Muslim, regardless of education or professed tolerance, "can free himself completely of his suspicions when circumstances bring him into contact with members of these two religions[Christianity and Judaism]." Critics may argue that it's the intent of the believer, not the belief, that matters. Forged in justifiable anger, this flamethrower of a book will hold the reader's attention with its heat, but it occasionally singes targets indiscriminately.
From the Publisher
"An absorbing book, full of Dickensian details."—Forbes

"Wafa Sultan is a great heroine of our times, willing to risk everything to stand up to these immense evils when most people are too fainthearted or politically correct to do so. A God Who Hates should be read closely and studied by the President, European leaders, and all Western policymakers and opinion-shapers — before it is too late."— Robert Spencer, author of the New York Times bestsellers The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades) and The Truth About Muhammad

“Wafa Sultan experienced firsthand the immense contempt of human dignity Islam harbours, and the unimaginable cruelty Muslim women have to endure on a daily basis, resulting from it. Her compelling book is a touching life story filled with bone chilling examples of what it is like to live in a society that is ruled by Islam and how valuable our Western freedom truly is. It is because brave women like Wafa Sultan have the courage to speak out against this doctrine of hate that we in the West have been forewarned. I hope that everyone reads this book and takes note of the important message it contains. We must defend our precious liberties, our Western freedom and never give in to Islam.”— Geert Wilders, member of the Dutch Parliament and leader of the Party for Freedom

"With rare courage and candor, Wafa Sultan throws open the shuttered windows on Islam, letting clean, bright sunshine pour into its darkest corners to illuminate Islam from the inside. This is where she lived it, confronted it, and ultimately rejected its sacralized teachings—on women, on marriage, on children, on Christians, on Jews, on freedom of conscience, on war, on world domination—as a humanity-warping pathology based on hate and fear. Such is the fascinating psychological analysis that is the underpinning achievement of A God Who Hates: With unique insight and unstinting compassion, Wafa Sultan, a trained psychiatrist, employs her expertise to put Islam on the couch. The results of her analysis will startle, engage, deepen and transform every reader’s understanding of Islam forever."— Diana West, author of The Death of the Grown-Up: How America’s Arrested Development is Bringing Down Western Civilization

“Wafa Sultan paints a scorching, unforgettable portrait of Syrian Muslim society, especially the degradation of its women, and lyrically appreciates her adopted American homeland, which she calls “the land of dreams.” But she also worries that Middle East customs are encroaching on the West and writes with passion to awaken Americans to a menace they barely recognize, much less fear.”—Daniel Pipes, Director, Middle East Forum

 “Like thousands of others, I first encountered Wafa Sultan on a stunning YouTube video.  Here was a woman on Al-Jazeer a TV, eloquently and courageously defending Western civilization, individualism and reason against the barbarity and mysticism of radical Islam.  Her performance was mesmerizing.  She was articulate, self-confident, and outspoken.  She stunned the audience, the interviewer and the pathetically out-matched Imam who opposed her.  Now Wafa Sultan has written her life story in this powerful book. She exposes the ugliness that is Muslim society in theMiddle East, while unapologetically defending the Western values she adopted when rejecting the religion of Islam.  If you want to understand this courageous woman, who continues to fight for her beliefs in spite of death threats, and to understand her views on the conflict between Islam and the West, this is a must read.”—Yaron Brook, Ph.D., President and Executive Director, The Ayn Rand Institute

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429984539
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 4/26/2011
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 342,024
  • File size: 258 KB

Meet the Author

WAFA SULTAN is a Syrian-born American psychiatrist included on Time Magazine's list of the 100 Most Influential People in the World in 2006. She created a firestorm on Al-Jazeera as the first Arab Muslim woman on that network who demanded to be heard.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix

1 A God Who Hates 1

2 The Women of Islam 11

3 Finding Hope for the Men of Islam 27

4 A Quest for Another God 39

5 The Nature of God in Islam 51

6 Muslim Men and Their Women 71

7 First Step to Freedom 91

8 "Who is that woman on Al Jazeera?" 111

9 Islam Is a Sealed Flask 155

10 Islam Is a Closed Market 179

11 Every Muslim Must Be Carefully Taught 191

12 Clash of Civilizations 203

13 Living in the "New" America: Thinking About Colin Powell and President Barack Hussein Obama 233

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 29 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(4)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

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(9)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 19, 2010

    Cultural Power

    Keen awareness of the affects cultural beliefs have on individuals & how the person behaves, moves and interacts within the world. A must read for everyone.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2009

    Wafa Sultan's Book Provides Insights into Radical Islamic Terrorism

    As we try to wrestle with and understand the recent tragedy at Fort Hood, might I recommend a book that I just completed last night. The title is: "A God Who Hates," authored by a female psychiatrist who was born and raised a Muslim - her name is Wafa Sultan. I devote much of my time to reading about terrorism and those nation-states, organizations, and individuals who commit themselves to supporting and/or carrying out acts of terrorism - particularly the radical Islamic variety - and our efforts to counter it. Of all the books I have read on the subject recently, hers is one of the more enlightening and truthful that I have come across. The book is available at any Barnes and Noble bookstore, online, etc. She was born and raised in Syria, educated as a medical doctor, and emigrated to the United States in 1988. Her book gives reader's an insider's view of the Islamic culture that she was raised in and her professional training as a psychiatrist provides her observations as to why she believes terrorism has been embraced by so many adherents of that culture. She does not downplay the real danger that we are facing from these adherents. She does not engage in political correctness.

    Here is a quote from her book:
    "The Koran says: 'Allah has purchased of the faithful their lives and worldly goods and in return has promised them the Garden. They will fight for His cause, slay and be slain.' (9:111) And so it is the Muslim's objective in war either to kill his enemy or to be killed by him, and he considers himself to have won whichever turns out to be the case. If the Muslim kills the enemy he has won, but if his enemy kills him, the Muslim's victory is even greater, as this action on his enemy's part has served only to allow the Muslim to meet his God all the sooner."

    As you might imagine, she has placed her very life in danger by speaking out as she has. Her book is a story of personal courage in the face of evil. By writing this book, she decided to do something about it.

    "The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it"
    -Albert Einstein

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2009

    Absolutely Amazing

    This provocative memoir is a must read of the year. I couldn't put it down until I had finished. Simply amazing.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2011

    Wish I could buy this for required reading for all.

    Thank You Wafa for writing this book. Your first hand experience validates your writing. I have already passed on my book and plan to not only buy additional copies, but to email and recommend to my Pastor as well as famiy, friends and acquaintances. I must also recommend the new revised addition by Hal Lindsey's, "The Everlasting Hatred,The Roots of Jihad", (just released) which gives deep historical understanding why the Muslims want to build a mosque by ground zero. It traces the history, from the beginning. The most significant thing Wafa says in the last couple of chapters is that there is a difference between what the Arab version of Islam reads compared to the West's interpretation, which is why everyone should read this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2011

    biased

    a setback for coexisting

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 10, 2011

    A god who hates

    Informative and a good read!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2010

    The God Who Hates

    I found this book to be extremely enlightening. It is very difficult for the Western mind to wrap itself around the philosophy found in Arabic Islam. This book clearly paints the picture of the thought process and its ramafications. It is fascinating, sad and unsettling but very informative and I think all of Western thought should read this book. I also feel that Wafa Sultan is a very brave woman and I wish her well and that the good Lord would protect her.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2012

    Too biased

    The muslims that I know are wonderful people, and it's only the extremists are the ones that feel that way.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2012

    Xyc

    Xxgxgxs

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2012

    -10000000000000000 stars

    God dont hate true belives. Dont u think HATE is a stroge word

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 28, 2011

    Good...not Great

    This is a good book; however I felt like the author was still biased and showed too much emotion and resentment for Islam. It didn't allow her to be seen as the best source of information against Islam. Her personal feelings were all too apparent in her opinion of the repression of the culture in which she grew up.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted July 29, 2011

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    Posted April 20, 2011

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    Posted April 14, 2011

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    Posted April 3, 2013

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    Posted August 3, 2010

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    Posted March 18, 2010

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    Posted March 28, 2011

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    Posted September 11, 2012

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    Posted March 5, 2010

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