Goddess in the Doorway

Goddess in the Doorway

5.0 5
by Mick Jagger
     
 

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While not technically Mick Jagger's first solo album -- he's hit the studio alone three times before -- this surprising disc marks the first time the Stones frontman has fully stepped out of the shadow of his legendary band. Jagger still struts and preens with the bravado of a stud half his age -- heck, maybe even a third -- on cocksure rockers like "Everybody Gettin…  See more details below

Overview

While not technically Mick Jagger's first solo album -- he's hit the studio alone three times before -- this surprising disc marks the first time the Stones frontman has fully stepped out of the shadow of his legendary band. Jagger still struts and preens with the bravado of a stud half his age -- heck, maybe even a third -- on cocksure rockers like "Everybody Gettin' High" (which features some blistering guitar work from Aerosmith's Joe Perry) and the leering riff-fest "God Gave Me Everything." On the other hand, he seems to be more willing to examine the foibles of middle age on the album's smattering of low-key ballads, most notably the melancholy "Call Me Up" and the reflective pledge "Brand New Set of Rules" (on which he calls on daughters Elizabeth and Georgia May for vocal aid). Goddess in the Doorway also finds Jagger tentatively testing the waters of some genres he's heretofore left unexplored, such as the electronic beats that percolate under the melody of "Gun" and the hip-hop flavor that resonates through the Wyclef Jean-produced "Hide Away"). The disc features a laundry list of guest stars -- performers as disparate as Lenny Kravitz, Bono, and matchbox twenty's Rob Thomas -- which sometimes lends an air of dislocation. The crowded room doesn't, however, distract the listener from the party's host. Remarkably, Mick makes good on his boast made so long ago -- sticking his pen down deep into his heart, he's produced a real flesh-and-blood album. It's only rock 'n' roll, sure, but it's awfully hard not to like it.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Goddess in the Doorway is shiny, impeccably produced mainstream rock, occasionally blessed with Mick Jagger's falsetto or sly turn phase and dominated by his attempt to cover all the bases: slinky dance tunes, some contemporary rhythms, hints of the Stones, tamed raunch, and frothy pop songs.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/13/2008
Label:
Virgin Japan
UPC:
4988006796379
catalogNumber:
68350

Related Subjects

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Mick Jagger   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Harmonica,Percussion,Vocals,Background Vocals,Slide Guitar
Lenny Kravitz   Bass,Drums,Electric Guitar,Tambourine,Background Vocals
Joe Perry   Guitar
Pete Townshend   Guitar
Ruby Turner   Background Vocals
Ian Thomas   Drums
Jim Keltner   Drums
Robert Aaron   Flute,Horn,Keyboards
Kenny Aronoff   Drums,Native American Drums
Bono   Vocals
Lenny Castro   Percussion
Matt Clifford   Synthesizer,Piano,Keyboards,Hammond Organ,Background Vocals,Mellotron,fender rhodes
Mike Dolan   Guitar
Marti Frederiksen   Acoustic Guitar,Drums,Background Vocals,Drum Loop
Milton McDonald   Guitar
Craig Ross   Guitar (12 String Acoustic)
Neil Sidewell   Trombone
Steve Sidwell   Trumpet
Phil Spalding   Bass
Rob Thomas   Background Vocals
Mikal Reid   Trumpet
Chris White   Tenor Saxophone
Wyclef Jean   Electric Guitar,spanish guitar
Paul Clarvis   Percussion
Jerry "Wonda" Duplessis   Bass
Christian Frederickson   Bass
Elizabeth Jagger   Background Vocals
Kyle Cook   Guitar
Steve Knightley   Cello

Technical Credits

Mick Jagger   Producer
Lenny Kravitz   Arranger,Producer
Richard Chycki   Engineer
Matt Clifford   Programming,Producer,Horn Arrangements,String Arrangements,drum programming
Mike Dolan   Engineer
Marti Frederiksen   Producer,String Arrangements
Andy Grassi   Engineer
Martin "Max" Heyes   Engineer,drum programming
Mikal Reid   Loop Programming
Wyclef Jean   Producer
Jerry "Wonda" Duplessis   Producer
Christopher Marc Potter   Producer,Engineer
Kevin Guarnieri   Engineer
Tim LeBlanc   Pro-Tools

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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Goddess in the Doorway 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm not a Mick Jagger solo fan based on his past releases, but this album is a major statement that Mick is alive and rocking! EVERY track is good, if not great. He's finally put it all together solo and once word of mouth gets out, this CD will be a big hit! Buy it, you won't regret it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mick goes back to his roots and delivers the goods. Laying bare his soul, he goes to confession (Brand New Set of Rules), yearns for simpler times passed (Too Far Gone), and tries to get at the female-related demons that seem to haunt him (Visions of Paradise, Don't Call Me Up).
Guest More than 1 year ago
The title track is the best work on this cd, but every single song is great in its own right. Good idea to add Bono, Lenny and Rob to an already great cd. Mick put heart and soul into this one!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am NO Jagger fanatic. I picked this one up because of the 4 star review in ROLLING STONE Magazine, and Mick's kick it out performance of 2 songs on SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE (if you missed it, catch the re-run, and thank me later). This is a ROCK album; no techno-psycho-babble-rap-fusion-etc. It recalls the BEST of the Stones group work in the last 20 years (not the early stuff) WITHOUT sounding like a ''Stones'' album. The best part is how the acoustic rhythm guitar (probably Mick's), gels so fine with the metal-edged electrics -- Extremely hard to pull off. Well done Mick. Wish you could make a Stones album this edgy and fun.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Stones have rested on their laurels for 30 years, arguably not having made a consistenly good record since Exile on Main Street. But Jagger's latest solo venture is also a venture into his heart and soul, a varied collection of rockers and ballads that finds the old man sounding less the jive talker and more the romantically and spiritually yearning rock philosopher. The musical support he gets from Lenny Kravitz, Bono et al. is also superb. ''God gave me everything I want. Come on. I'll give it all to you,'' Jagger screams in what might be the best damn rock song of the year. Thanks for giving it back, Mick.