The Goddess Of Fried Okra

( 11 )

Overview

Grief. Hope. Love. Sword fights. And the crisp glory of fried okra.

Ex-cocktail waitress and "convenience story professional" Eudora "Pea" O'Brien is filled with grief and regret, low on cash and all alone. Headed down the hot, dusty back roads of central Texas, Pea is convinced she'll find a sign leading her to the reincarnated soul of the sister who raised her. A sign that she's found her place in the world ...

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The Goddess Of Fried Okra

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Overview

Grief. Hope. Love. Sword fights. And the crisp glory of fried okra.

Ex-cocktail waitress and "convenience story professional" Eudora "Pea" O'Brien is filled with grief and regret, low on cash and all alone. Headed down the hot, dusty back roads of central Texas, Pea is convinced she'll find a sign leading her to the reincarnated soul of the sister who raised her. A sign that she's found her place in the world of the living again.

At least that's what the psychic promised.

In an unforgettably funny and poignant journey, Pea collects an unlikely family of strays-a starving kitten, a pregnant teenager, a sexy con man trying to go straight, and a ferocious gun dealer named Glory, who introduces Pea to the amazing, sword-wielding warrior goddesses of Texas author Robert E. Howard-creator of the Conan the Barbarian novels-and celebrated in festival every year. Six foot tall, red-headed Pea looks good with a sword in her hand.

Glory, the goddesses, and a grandmotherly café owner become Pea's unlikely gurus as she struggles to learn swordplay and the art of perfect fried okra. She'll have to master both if she's going to find what matters most-her own lost soul.

"Jean Brashear writes with warmth and emotion truth. The depth of her understanding of human nature marks her as a writer to watch, a writer to read and a writer to enjoy." --Debbie Macomber, #1 NY Times Bestselling Author

"THE GODDESS OF FRIED OKRA is a fabulous read. Riveting. Original.
Those characters grabbed my imagination and didn't let go." --Cathy Maxwell, NY Times Bestselling Author

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780984125890
  • Publisher: BelleBooks
  • Publication date: 3/17/2010
  • Pages: 242
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 4, 2010

    Goddesses are ageless

    Brashear had me at the title. Every southern girl worth her grits should know how to cook or at least appreciate fried okra and there is probably a pageant somewhere that crowns an okra queen. But, ah to be a goddess moves us into a different realm. Although Pea put me off a little as she started her journey (a little too frantic in the exit), once this convenience store professional was in her familiar territory (in the cooler to be exact), I was on the trip with her. For what most will consider a light novel, I found the characters at the same time familiar, unique, and flawed in endearing ways. Although Pea did not make it far in miles, she traveled a lifetime and I, for one, found the closure at the end of the story very full circle and satisfying. It made me shut the book for a few minutes and think "what would I do?" and that to me is a book worth not only keeping but passing on. (I have already mailed two copies to old friends.)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 9, 2010

    The reviewer was right

    I saw this review "Eudora Welty meets Sue Monk Kidd and they lunch with Fannie Flagg" (http://justjanga.blogspot.com/2010/04/goddess-of-fried-okra-review.html) and I couldn't agree more! The book is charming, funny and very touching. Pea O'Brien is a character you will never forget, and her band of misfits kept me up all night reading. I had to be sure Pea was okay. This book is going on my keeper shelf, and I'm telling everyone about it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 17, 2011

    Good read

    This book is a mish mash of oddball ideas, unexpected characters, and historical road markers that somehow works. That a 32 year old woman with only six hundred bucks in her pocket should take off for New Mexico in search of her dead sister's reincarnated soul (here we are at oddball) is whacky enough. But then she takes up first with a stray kitten, then a pregnant teenager and finally a con man named Valentine (a few of the unexpected characters). Feeling somehow responsible for all three, Eudora"Pea" O'Brien, hauls them along with her (making regular stops to read markers) without a clue about how they might impact her journey - or her finances. But thank God (or the goddess) for the cranky old car she's driving. The poor thing breaks down just outside of Jewel, Texas, where more oddities, secrets, unexpected characters, and fried okra await this motley crew.
    I did enjoy the read but there are a couple of things I'm not quite sure I liked. One was the abrupt introduction of Valentine, in third person (with the rest of the book in first), and though brief, it kind of put a kink in the smooth reading of the story. The author does it again when this character departs Jewel for a while, then returns, again abruptly, at the wrap up. In addition, the goddess idea wastn't quite fleshed out especially since the fried okra angle was not a big part of the story. Be that as it may, I gobbled up the book and I think you will, too.

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  • Posted November 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    This is an intriguing character study that focuses on Pea

    Years on the road with Mama and Sister running away from bill collectors led to six foot red haired Eudora "Pea" O'Brien swearing she would settle down in one place to root and die. When Mama died, Sister was sixteen and Pea eight. Sister ran off social services do-gooders and used her glaring mojo to send away her no good father Alvin. Instead she raised Pea.

    Now over two decades since mama died, Sister is dead too. Pea is filled with remorse with how she treated her Sister who sacrificed so much for her. She wants to tell her she is sorry and appreciative. Like Sister, Pea believes in reincarnation, but to reconnect she must find Sister's new host body. Pea begins a Texas Odyssey seeking the signs of Sister. Her trek with no money leads to other outsiders joining her quest as they seek to belong too. Soon she finds herself mentored in sword fighting by a reincarnation of Howard's Red Sonja and in the most critical element of southern living, creating fried okra fit for the Goddesses; while also raising a child as Pea has found the glory of a family.

    This is an intriguing character study that focuses on Pea who learns what life is all about with the death of beloved Sister and her Dorothy on the road to Oz trek as she picks up caring misfits in need. None of the support cast is fully developed as their sole purpose is support of Pea. Fans who enjoy a leisurely paced Texas Odyssey will want to accompany Pea and her companions as they journey in real terms just a few miles but metaphorically light-years.

    Harriet Klausner

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 2, 2010

    Delightful and Heart Warming

    This is a delightful and heart warming story about a woman's journey from grief to hope. Pea O'Brien is an unlikely heroine, searching for her place in the world -- and for the sister she's lost. We like her, empathize with her grief, and wish her well as she gathers a group of lost souls -- heals them, heals herself, and creates a new family from strangers. Absolutely delightful!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2011

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    Posted August 5, 2010

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    Posted April 10, 2010

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