Goddesses in Everywoman: A New Psychology of Women [NOOK Book]

Overview

A classic work of female psychology that uses seven archetypcal goddesses as a way of describing behavior patterns and personality traits is being introduced to the next generation of readers with a new introduction by the author.

Psychoanalyst Jean Bolen's career soared in the early 1980s when Goddesses in Everywoman was published. Thousands of women readers became fascinated with identifying their own inner goddesses and using these ...

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Goddesses in Everywoman: A New Psychology of Women

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Overview

A classic work of female psychology that uses seven archetypcal goddesses as a way of describing behavior patterns and personality traits is being introduced to the next generation of readers with a new introduction by the author.

Psychoanalyst Jean Bolen's career soared in the early 1980s when Goddesses in Everywoman was published. Thousands of women readers became fascinated with identifying their own inner goddesses and using these archetypes to guide themselves to greater self–esteem, creativity, and happiness.

Bolen's radical idea was that just as women used to be unconscious of the powerful effects that cultural stereotypes had on them, they were also unconscious of powerful archetypal forces within them that influence what they do and how they feel, and which account for major differences among them. Bolen believes that an understanding of these inner patterns and their interrelationships offers reassuring, true–to–life alternatives that take women far beyond such restrictive dichotomies as masculine/feminine, mother/lover, careerist/housewife. And she demonstrates in this book how understanding them can provide the key to self–knowledge and wholeness.

Dr. Bolen introduced these patterns in the guise of seven archetypal goddesses, or personality types, with whom all women could identify, from the autonomous Artemis and the cool Athena to the nurturing Demeter and the creative Aphrodite, and explains how to decide which to cultivate and which to overcome, and how to tap the power of these enduring archetypes to become a better "heroine" in one's own life story.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061747953
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/13/2009
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 145,869
  • File size: 795 KB

Meet the Author

Jean Shinoda Bolen, M.D., is an internationally known Jungian analyst, clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California at San Francisco, and a former member of the board of the Ms. Foundation for Women. She lives in Mill Valley, California. Contact jean Bolen at jeanbolen.com.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Goddesses as Inner Images

A fragile baby girl was put in my friend Ann's arms, a "blue baby" with a congenital heart defect. Ann was emotionally moved as she held the small infant and looked at her face. She also felt a deep ache in the center of her chest under her breast bone (or sternum). Within moments, she and that baby had forged a bond. After that, Ann visited the child regularly, maintaining contact as long as it was possible. The infant did not survive open-heart surgery. She lived for only a few months, yet she made a profound impression on Ann. At that first meeting, she touched an inner image imbued with emotion that lay deep within Ann's psyche.

In 1966, Anthony Stevens, a psychiatrist and author, studied attachment bonds in infancy at the Metera Babies Centre, near Athens, Greece. What he observed happening between nurses and these orphaned infants paralleled Ann's experience. He found that a special bond was formed between a baby and a specific nurse through mutual delight and attraction, a process that was like falling in love.

Stevens's observations belie the "cupboard love theory," which postulates that bonds gradually form between a mother and a child through caretaking and feeding. He found that no less than a third of the infants became attached to nurses who had done little or no routine caretaking of the child before the bond formed. Afterward, the nurse invariably did much more for the child, usually because she came to reciprocate the attachment but also because the child would often refuse to be tended by any other nurse when "his" nurse was in the vicinity.'

Some new mothers experience animmediate attachment to their newborn; a fiercely protective love and deep tenderness toward this infant wells up in them as they hold the precious, helpless baby to whom they have just given birth. We say that the baby evokes the mother archetype in such women. For other new mothers, however, maternal love grows over a period of months, becoming obvious by the time the baby is eight or nine months old.

When having a baby does not activate "the mother" in a woman, the woman usually knows that she isn't feeling something other mothers feel, or something she herself has felt for another child. The child misses a vital connection when "the mother" archetype isn't activated, and keeps yearning for it to occur. (Although, as happened with nurses at the Greek orphanage, the archetypal mother-child pattern can be fulfilled through a woman who is not the biological mother.) And yearning for that missed attachment can continue into adulthood. One forty-nine-year-old woman, who was in a women's group with me, wept as she spoke of her mother's death, because now that her mother was dead that hoped-for connection could never develop.

Just as "the mother" is a deeply felt way of being that a child can activate in a woman, so also each child is "programmed" to seek "the mother." In both mother and child(and therefore in all humans), an image of mother is associated with maternal behavior and emotion. This inner image at work in the psyche—an image that determines behavior and emotional responses unconsciously—is an archetype.

"The Mother" is only one of many archetypes—or latent, internally determined roles—that can become activated in a woman. When we recognize the different archetypes, we can see more clearly what is acting in us and in others. In this book, I will be introducing archetypes that are active in women's psyches and that are personified as Greek goddesses. For example, Demeter, the maternal goddess, is an embodiment of the mother archetype. The others are Persephone (the daughter), Hera (the wife), Aphrodite (the lover), Artemis (the sister and competitor), Athena (the strategist), and Hestia (the hearthkeeper). As names for archetypes, of course, the goddesses are helpful only when the images fit the woman's feelings, for archetypes do not really have names.

C. G. Jung introduced the concept of archetypes into psychology. He saw archetypes as patterns of instinctual behavior that were contained in a collective unconscious. The collective unconscious is the part of the unconscious that is not individual but universal, with contents and modes of behavior that are more or less the same everywhere and in all individuals.

Myths and fairytales are expressions of archetypes, as aremany images and themes in dreams. The presence of common archetypal patterns in all people accounts for similarities in the mythologies of many different cultures. As preexistent patterns, they influence how we behave and how we react to others.

THE GODDESSES AS ARCHETYPES

Most of us were taught about the gods and goddesses of Mt. Olympus at some time in school and have seen statues and paintings of them. The Romans worshipped these same deities, addressing them by their Latin names. The Olympians had very human attributes: their behavior, emotional reactions, appearance, and mythology provide us with patterns that parallel human behavior and attitudes. They are also familiar to us because they are archetypal; that is, they represent models of being and behaving we recognize from the collective unconscious we all share.

The most famous of them were the Twelve Olympians: six gods, Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Apollo, Ares, Hephaestus, and six goddesses, Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Artemis, Athena, and Aphrodite. One of the twelve, Hestia (Goddess of the Hearth) was replaced by Dionysus (God of Wine), thus changing the male/female balance to seven gods and five goddesses. The goddess archetypes I am describing in this book are the six Olympian goddesses—Hestia, Demeter, Hera, Artemis, Athena, and Aphrodite—plus Persephone, whose mythology is inseparable from Demeter's.

I have divided these seven goddesses into three categories: the virgin goddesses, the vulnerable goddesses, and the alchemical (or transformative) goddess. The virgin goddesses were classified together in ancient Greece. The other two categories are my designations. Modes of consciousness, favored roles, and motivating factors are distinguishing characteristics of each group. Attitudes toward others, the need for attachment, and the importance of relationships also are distinctly different in each category. Goddesses representing all three categories need expression somewhere in a woman's life—in order for her to love deeply, work meaningfully, and be sensual and creative.

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Table of Contents

Foreward by Gloria Steinem

Acknowledgements

Introduction: There Are goddesses in Everywoman

1.    Goddess es as Inner Images

2.    Activating the Goddesses

3.    The Virgin Goddesses: Artemis, Athena, and Hestia

4.    Artemis: Goddess of the Hunt and Moon, Competitor and Sister

5.    Athena: Goddess of Wisdom and Crafts, Strategist and Father's Daughter

6.    Hestia: Goddess of the Heath and Temple, Wise Woman and Maiden Aunt

7.    The vulnerable Goddesses: Hera, Demeter and Persephone

8.    Hera: Goddess of Marriage, Commitment Maker and Wife

9.    Demeter: Goddess of Grain, Nurturer and Mother

10.    Persephone: The Maiden and Queen of the Underworld, Receptive Woman and Mother's Daughter

11.    The Alchemical Goddess

12.    Aphrodite: Goddess of Love and Beauty.    Creative Woman and Lover

13.    Which Goddess Gets the Golden Apple?

14.    The heroine in Everywoman

Appendix:     Who's Who in Greek Mythology
                     Cast of Characters (list describing the gods and goddesses)
                     Goddess Chart
                     Summary in chart form
                     Notes
                     Bibliography
                     Index

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 17 of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2012

    Interesting

    I first heard about this book when i read Jane Lynch's book Happy Accidents. I really enjoyed reading this, there were a lot of things I didn't know about the goddesses. I would recommend this to anyone with an open mind.

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  • Posted June 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Your Archetypal Power for Women

    Archetypes are a powerful tool for self-knowledge because they tap into the universal collective language we all share. Learning to become more aware of your own archetypes can help you see yourself, the bigger picture and is a good place to start creating solutions for yourself and others. Finding out which Goddess sits at the head of your table is also a very good way to balance your own personality so you are able to find a voice for lesser known parts (Goddesses) of your inner self. I high recommend this book in every woman's collection for insight into strengths and weaknesses and personal empowerment.

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  • Posted March 2, 2010

    ENLIGHTEN THE FEMININE AND BE AWAKENED.

    THIS IS THE TRUTH OF ALL WOMEN.FINALLY WE ARE ALL VALIDATED BY OUR THOUGHTS,FEELINGS AND THE WONDERMENT THAT IS OUR FEMININE SELVES.IF ANYONE CHOOSES TO DELVE DEEPER INTO THE PSYCHE WE WILL LEARN TO ADAPT AND BEND LIKE FLOWERS TOWARD NATURAL LIGHT.FEAR IS COMPLETELY DESTRUCTIVE AND HAS NO PLACE IN OUR LIVES.WE DO NOT REQUIRE MAGAZINES TO TELL US HOW TO FEEL,EAT, WHAT TO WEAR.BASICALLY "BE ON TREND".WOMEN'S LITERATURE CAN BUILD US UP SUCH AS THIS TOUR DE FORCE OR TELL US WE HAVE FEET OF CLAY AND LISTEN TO OTHERS INSTEAD OF OUR OWN INSTINCTUAL TRUTHS. THIS IS A GIFT WITH HAND OPENED,CLASP AND TO THINE SELF LEARN ONE'S OWN TRUTHS OF SELF.ALSO READ,DESCENT TO THE GODDESS.PLUS ANYTHING BY DR. MARION WOODMAN.BE ENRAPTURED!

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  • Posted February 21, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great for Women's Studies

    I read this book many years ago and shared it with friends, my copy is falling apart but will live on. I bought a copy of my sister as she turned 50 this year. I love all of Jean Shinoda Bolen's works and her expertise in her field.

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