Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves: Women in Classical Antiquity / Edition 2

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Overview

"The first general treatment of women in the ancient world to reflect the critical insights of modern feminism. Though much debated, its position as the basic textbook on women's history in Greece and Rome has hardly been challenged."—Mary Beard, Times Literary Supplement. Illustrations.

"The first general treatment of women in the ancient world to reflect the critical insights of modern feminism. Though much debated, its position as the basic textbook on women's history in Greece and Rome has hardly been challenged."--Mary Beard, Times Literary Supplement. Illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The first general treatment of women in the ancient world to reflect the critical insights of modern feminism. Though much debated, its position as the basic textbook on women's history in Greece and Rome has hardly been challenged."—Mary Beard, Times Literary Supplement

"Pomeroy's pioneering study on the status and activities of women in antiquity was, and has remained, a milestone in classical historiography."—Peter Green, Univerity of Texas at Austin

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805210309
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/28/1995
  • Series: Studies in the Life of Women
  • Edition description: REPRINT
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 142,467
  • Product dimensions: 5.14 (w) x 7.95 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Table of Contents

1. Goddesses and Gods
2. Women in the Bronze Age and Homeric Epic
3. The Dark Age and the Archaic Period
4. Women and the City of Athens
5. Private Life in Classical Athens
6. Images of Women in the Literature of Classical Athens
7. Hellenistic Women
8. The Roman Matron of the Late Republic and Early Empire
9. Women of the Roman Lower Classes
10. The Role of Women in the Religion of the Romans

Epilogue: The Elusive Women of Classical Antiquity

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 7, 2014

    Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!

    Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2004

    Great for the classicists!

    Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves is a great book. It deals with women in classical antiquity. Its main focus is Greek and Roman women. The book is split into two parts, the first dealing with the Greek world and the second with the Roman world. Some of the topics they talked about were mythology and how is was tied into society, a woman¿s role in the household as well as the family, what type of women there were, how the state treated them, homosexuality, and many other topics. Sarah B. Pomeroy wrote this book and did a great job at it. Her research was very well done and she was not biased at all. As being a classical student at Monmouth College, I found this book a great deal of help and interest to my major. It not only talked about woman but also about men and children. This book can easily be compared to Lefkowitz and Fant¿s Pandora¿s Daughters. However, Pomeroy talked a lot more about Greek and Roman mythology. She went far into detail about how the Greeks and Romans based their society on their Gods. The two most interesting topics of this book were infanticide and homosexuality. Both were practiced a lot back then and nothing was thought of it unlike today. There are many more interesting facts in this book that would make it well worth reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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