Godly Clergy in Early Stuart England: The Caroline Puritan Movement, c.1620-1643

Godly Clergy in Early Stuart England: The Caroline Puritan Movement, c.1620-1643

by Tom Webster
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0521461707

ISBN-13: 9780521461702

Pub. Date: 11/01/1997

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Religion, and Puritanism in particular, was a crucially important influence in seventeenth-century England. This book attempts to trace the way in which Puritan clergymen saw themselves and the world in which they lived. It goes on to discuss the changes they wanted to make to the Church of England in terms of services and in terms of how they wanted to replace

Overview

Religion, and Puritanism in particular, was a crucially important influence in seventeenth-century England. This book attempts to trace the way in which Puritan clergymen saw themselves and the world in which they lived. It goes on to discuss the changes they wanted to make to the Church of England in terms of services and in terms of how they wanted to replace bishops. By looking at such matters through the networks of friendship and alliances made by the ministers, a new picture emerges of the role played by Puritans in the decades leading up to the English Civil War.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521461702
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
11/01/1997
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Early Modern British History Series
Pages:
370
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.94(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; List of abbreviations; Introduction; Part I. Society, Clerical Conference and the Church of England: 1. Clerical education and the household seminary; 2. Profitable conferences and the settlement of godly ministers; 3. Fasting and prayer; 4. Clerical associations and the Church of England; Part II. The Godly Ministry: Piety and Practice: 5. The image of a godly minister; 6. Religiosity and sociability; Part III. 'These Uncomfortable Times': Conformity and the Godly Ministers 1628–38: 7. Thomas Hooker and the conformity debate; 8. Trajectories of response to Laudianism; 9. The ecclesiastical courts and the Essex visitation of 1631; 10. Juxon, Wren and the implementation of Laudianism; 11. The diocese of Peterborough: a see of conflict; 12. The metropolitical visitation of Essex and the strategies of evasion; Part IV. 'These Dangerous Times': The Puritan Diaspora 1631–42; 13. John Dury and the godly ministers; 14. Choices of suffering and flight; 15. The 'non-separating Congregationalists' and Massachusetts; 16. Thomas Hooker and the Amesians; 17. Alternative ecclesiologists to 1642; 18. Conclusion.

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