God's Appointed Times: A Practical Guide for Understanding and Celebrating the Biblical Holy Days

God's Appointed Times: A Practical Guide for Understanding and Celebrating the Biblical Holy Days

by Barney Kasdan
     
 

The biblical holy days are not just for Jews. Christians, too, can receive the blessing of these glorious days, the greatest object lessons in the Bible.

God gave each day to teach his people about him and his relationship to them. From the Sabbath, which pictures eternity, to the popular holiday, Hanukkah, mentioned by name only in the gospel of John, the special

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Overview

The biblical holy days are not just for Jews. Christians, too, can receive the blessing of these glorious days, the greatest object lessons in the Bible.

God gave each day to teach his people about him and his relationship to them. From the Sabbath, which pictures eternity, to the popular holiday, Hanukkah, mentioned by name only in the gospel of John, the special times were set apart to bless the people of God.

In this book, Barney Kasdan, leader of Kehilat Ariel of San Diego, one of the largest Messianic congregations in the world, explains every holy day described in Scripture. He teaches about the major and minor holy days, ever mindful that he is writing to both Jews and Christians.

Beginning with the Sabbath, the first holy day revealed in Scripture, he writes about Passover, Firstfruits, Pentecost, Trumpets, the Day of Atonement, The Feast of Tabernacles, Hanukkah-the Festival of Dedication, and Purim, the special day given in the time of Queen Esther.

Each chapter offers historical background, traditional Jewish observance, relevance to the New Testament, prophetic significance, and a practical guide for believers, including recipes, songs, and crafts.

There are other books on the subject of the Feasts of Israel, but this one goes beyond them all. It is written by a Messianic Jew, a Jew who trusts Yeshua. Who better to explain God's Appointed Times?

AUTHOR BIO:

Barney Kasdan is leader of Kehilat Ariel of San Diego, California, one of the largest and most successful congregations in the world. He holds degrees from Biola University (B.A.) and Talbot Theological Seminary (M.Div.). He also completed a year of post-graduate study at the University of Judaism in Los Angeles. Mr. Kasdan is the author if the popular book "God's Appointed Customs".

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781880226544
Publisher:
Messianic Jewish Publishers
Publication date:
07/28/1993
Pages:
135
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.44(h) x 0.44(d)

Read an Excerpt

(Excerpted from chapter 1)

Shabbat The Sabbath

THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

The Lord said to Moses, "Speak to the Israelites and say to them: 'These are my appointed feasts, the appointed feasts of the Lord, which you are to proclaim as sacred assemblies. There are six days when you may work, but the seventh day is a sabbath of rest, a day of sacred assembly. You are not to do any work; wherever you live, it is a Sabbath to the Lord'" (Leviticus 23:1-3).

It might surprise some to see a discussion of the biblical holidays start with Shabbat. After all, this is such a common day. It occurs once a week. The Jewish perspective is different. It is not that Shabbat is so common, but that it is so special, that we are to observe it every seven days. With that in mind, it is perfectly logical to mention the Sabbath at the head of the list. Besides, in the chronology of Leviticus 23, Shabbat comes first.

Shabbat means "to rest," which tells us a large part of the purpose of this important observance-restoration. From the ancient Greeks to the modern corporate executive, mankind tends to become obsessed with work and "getting ahead." There is always more to do. Yet, without proper rest and refreshment, human strength and creativity fail.

In his infinite wisdom, God told the children of Israel to recharge themselves physically, emotionally and spiritually. God demonstrated this principle when he created the universe. For six days he formed the world and everything in it; but, on the seventh day he rested. Consequently, the seventh day, Shabbat, is to be a perpetual reminder of God the creator and our need to find rest in him (Exodus 31:16?17).

Based on the creation account of Genesis, Shabbat lasts from sundown Friday evening to sundown Saturday. God defines a day in the following order: "there was evening, and there was morning." Hence, the Hebrew calendar traditionally starts a day at sunset of the previous evening.

Some Christians might call Sunday the "Christian Sabbath"; however, this is technically incorrect. Sunday is never called the Sabbath in the Bible. In fact, the word "Sunday" never appears in the original text of the Scriptures. It is called "the first day of the week" (see Matthew 28:1 and I Corinthians 16:2, NIV). This is the biblical way of reckoning days of the week. All days are counted in relationship to Shabbat (first day, second day, etc.), giving further evidence of the centrality of this day to Jewish people.

TRADITIONAL JEWISH OBSERVANCE

The traditional Jewish community understands the observance of Shabbat on many different levels. To the classical rabbis, verses such as Exodus 20:8 were to be eminently practical as we "remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy." The implications of this verse have filled volumes of rabbinic commentaries, but the two?fold theme is clear: remember the creator and set the day aside to rest in him. Many beautiful Jewish customs have developed to remind people of these truths. . .

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