BN.com Gift Guide

God's Bestseller: William Tyndale, Thomas More, and the Writing of the English Bible--A Story of Martyrdom and Betrayal [NOOK Book]

Overview


The English Bible--the most familiar book in our language--is the product of a man who was exiled, vilified, betrayed, then strangled, then burnt.

William Tyndale left England in 1524 to translate the word of God into English. This was heresy, punishable by death. Sir Thomas More, hailed as a saint and a man for all seasons, considered it his divine duty to pursue Tyndale. ...
See more details below
God's Bestseller: William Tyndale, Thomas More, and the Writing of the English Bible--A Story of Martyrdom and Betrayal

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - First Edition)
$7.99
BN.com price

Overview


The English Bible--the most familiar book in our language--is the product of a man who was exiled, vilified, betrayed, then strangled, then burnt.

William Tyndale left England in 1524 to translate the word of God into English. This was heresy, punishable by death. Sir Thomas More, hailed as a saint and a man for all seasons, considered it his divine duty to pursue Tyndale. He did so with an obsessive ferocity that, in all probability, led to Tyndale's capture and death.

The words that Tyndale wrote during his desperate exile have a beauty and familiarity that still resonate across the English-speaking world: "Death, where is thy sting?...eat, drink, and be merry...our Father which art in heaven."

His New Testament, which he translated, edited, financed, printed, and smuggled into England in 1526, passed with few changes into subsequent versions of the Bible. So did those books of the Old Testament that he lived to finish.

Brian Moynahan's lucid and meticulously researched biography illuminates Tyndale's life, from his childhood in England, to his death outside Brussels. It chronicles the birth pangs of the Reformation, the wrath of Henry VIII, the sympathy of Anne Boleyn, and the consuming malice of Thomas More. Above all, it reveals the English Bible as a labor of love, for which a man in an age more spiritual than our own willingly gave his life.


Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The story of William Tyndale's translation of the Bible is familiar. Caught up in the Reformation's efforts to provide ordinary readers with the Scriptures in the vernacular, Tyndale set out to produce a faithful translation of the Hebrew and Greek manuscripts of the Old and New Testament. As journalist Moynahan points out in this exhaustively detailed biography, Tyndale's desire to complete such a translation brought him into conflict with the king and his court, for the fruits of the Reformation had yet to make their way into England. Thus, Tyndale set out on a life of self-imposed exile in Germany and Amsterdam, where he translated and printed his Bible. As his work made its way into England-thanks in large part to Anne Boleyn's advocacy-Sir Thomas More, one of England's most active heretic hunters, attempted in every possible way to have Tyndale tried as a heretic. Moynahan recounts the oft-told story of Tyndale's subterfuge and his remarkable contribution to the history of Bible translation while recreating the political and religious intrigue of early 16th-century England. Moynahan captures well More's hatred of Tyndale, whom he called "a hellhound in the kennel of the devil," as well as Tyndale's burning desire to contribute to God's work through Bible translation, even if it meant death at the stake. As Moynahan points out, Tyndale's translation still exists in the King James Version, since his words account for 84% of its New Testament and 76% of its Old Testament. (Aug.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
It is one of supreme ironies of history that the man who first translated the Bible into English was burnt at the stake as a heretic, and yet his influence echoes in our biblical language today. So great was 16th-century scholar William Tyndale's influence that the Authorized, or King James, Version, whose translation was completed 75 years after Tyndale's death, repeated verbatim 84 percent of his entire New Testament and almost 76 percent of the Old Testament books he had translated. Yet Tyndale remains an elusive individual, for during much of his life he was on the run, persecuted by both the Catholic Church and the English government, whose most zealous enforcer was Sir (now Saint) Thomas More. Despite the difficulties in obtaining primary material concerning Tyndale's own life, Moynahan (The Faith: A History of Christianity), a former foreign correspondent of the London Times, uses his journalistic expertise to tease out a riveting, panoramic story of political and ecclesiastical intrigue, from 1428 until Tyndale's execution in 1536. The story crisscrosses Europe and involves many of the most important church and political leaders of the day. Although it is written in British English and the emphasis centers on political rather than theological controversies, the tale is told with novelistic attention to detail and will have broad appeal in public libraries.-Fr. Charlie Murray, C.S.S., Fordham Univ., New York Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A tale of doctrinal squabble in the ax-happy England of Henry VIII, from which emerges this important life lesson: never piss off a saint. He wasn't a saint then, but Thomas More, author of Utopia and sympathetic hero of A Man for All Seasons, had plenty going for him in his day. He was among the richest and most powerful civil servants in 16th-century England, and for a time he had leave from his king to do pretty much whatever he wanted. One of his favorite hobbies was slaughtering Protestants, writes former London Sunday Times correspondent Moynahan; More "reveled in burnings" and was pleased to put his enemies to "ye fyre ever lastynge." He conceived a special hatred for a minor cleric named William Tyndale, a gifted linguist and prose stylist. Arguing that English "doth correspond with scripture than ever Latin may," Tyndale worked for years on a vernacular Bible, which put him at odds with the clerical establishment on a number of counts. The priests considered the Bible and its interpretation their exclusive province; the laity had no business opening its pages or pondering alternative readings, and when they did (as when one unfortunate tailor suggested that Christ didn't offer his literal body at the Last Supper), they were tortured, burned, or drawn and quartered. Tyndale escaped this dispiriting climate and earned More's renewed hatred by relocating to Germany and the Low Countries, centers of the Lutheran heresy. The author charges that More arranged for Tyndale's arrest and subsequent martyrdom in Belgium just before being arrested and executed himself in 1635, having crossed King Henry one time too many. But Tyndale's legacy endures, Moynahan notes, for the King James Bibleincorporates much of his English, including some of its most beautiful passages. A well-crafted outing for fans of early modern English history or of fiction rooted in scholarly detection and religious intrigue (e.g., The Name of the Rose and the Caedfael mysteries).
Evening Standard [U.K.]
"A triumph...authoritative, vital, passionate...and superbly able to re-create the mentality of a violent and agonized time."
Irish Times
"A thriller, a history, and a biography all rolled into one"
Mail on Sunday [U.K.
"With its double agents and whispered conferences in taverns, [God's Bestseller] is almost worthy of LeCarré...artfully paced."
The Scotsman [U.K.]
"Scrupulously researched, admirably fair-minded, and, above all, extraordinarily readable, Moynahan's biography is a real revelation."
The Times
"Testifies to his unique influence on what might be called the current English of daily life."
From the Publisher
Praise for God's Bestseller

"Testifies to his unique influence on what might be called the current English of daily life."-The Times [U.K.]

"A thriller, a history, and a biography all rolled into one"-Irish Times

"A triumph...authoritative, vital, passionate...and superbly able to re-create the mentality of a violent and agonized time." -Evening Standard [U.K.]

"Scrupulously researched, admirably fair-minded, and, above all, extraordinarily readable, Moynahan's biography is a real revelation."-The Scotsman [U.K.]

"With its double agents and whispered conferences in taverns, [God's Bestseller] is almost worthy of LeCarré...artfully paced."-Mail on Sunday [U.K.]

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781466866508
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 3/18/2014
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 1,179,881
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author


Brian Moynahan is a former history scholar of Cambridge University. He was a foreign correspondent, and latterly the European editor, of the London Sunday Times. As a foreign correspondent, he reported in the United States from Texas, New York City, Los Angeles, Florida, Massachusetts, and Washington, D.C. He also spent time with U.S. forces in Vietnam 1964-68 and in the Middle East. He lives in England.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface: On the Burning of Heretics
1 Youth 1
2 Decision 22
3 London 36
4 The New Testament 53
5 Printing 63
6 'Lyfe, love, faveour, grace, blessinge...' 76
7 Auguries 87
8 'A filthy foam of blasphemies...' 100
9 The Fish Cellar 114
10 Wicked Mammon 131
11 Manhunt 142
12 Obedience 152
13 The Flight to Hamburg 167
14 Eye for Eye, Tothe for Tothe 188
15 The Shorte Fyre 204
16 'My name is Tyndale' 223
17 The Confutation 242
18 'The Lord forgive Sir Thomas More!' 255
19 'Let not your body faint' 267
20 'A fellow Englishman, who is everywhere and nowhere' 292
21 Judas 313
22 The Paymaster 329
23 'Though I gave my body even that I burned...' 355
24 Aftermath 380
Sources 391
Notes 404
Index 407
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2003

    Great Story Well Told

    The story of William Tyndale and the writing of the English Bible is a fascinating one, and in Moynahan's hands the story is quite well told. The author does go off on tangents every now and then, often at the expense of the drama of the story. Still, the long distance showdown between Tyndale and More grows steadily in tension. Nice to see More take some knocks as well.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)