God's Debris: A Thought Experiment

God's Debris: A Thought Experiment

4.7 24
by Scott Adams
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

God's Debris is the first non-Dilbert, non-humor book by best-selling author Scott Adams. Adams describes God's Debris as a thought experiment wrapped in a story. It's designed to make your brain spin around inside your skull.

Imagine that  you meet a very old man who—you eventually realize—knows literally everything.…  See more details below

Overview

God's Debris is the first non-Dilbert, non-humor book by best-selling author Scott Adams. Adams describes God's Debris as a thought experiment wrapped in a story. It's designed to make your brain spin around inside your skull.

Imagine that  you meet a very old man who—you eventually realize—knows literally everything. Imagine that he explains for you the great mysteries of life: quantum physics, evolution, God, gravity, light psychic phenomenon, and probability—in a way so simple, so novel, and so compelling that it all fits together and makes perfect sense. What does it feel like to suddenly understand everything?

You may not find the final answer to the big question, but God's Debris might provide the most compelling vision of reality you will ever read. The thought experiment is this: Try to figure out what's wrong with the old man's explanation of reality. Share the book with your smart friends, then discuss it later while enjoying a beverage.

It has no violence or sex, but the ideas are powerful and not appropriate for readers under fourteen.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

"A thought experiment wrapped in a story...designed to make your brain spin around inside your skull." That's how Scott Adams describes his first non-Dilbert book, published in 2001 and now finally available in paperback. God's Debris is the story of a package, an old man, God, quantum physics, evolution, and a few other things. It is a fable you will remember long after you've lost the book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781449459840
Publisher:
Andrews McMeel Publishing, LLC
Publication date:
12/24/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
132
Sales rank:
203,592
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

What started as a doodle has turned Scott Adams into a superstar of the cartoon world. Dilbert debuted on the comics page in 1989, while Adams was in the tech department at Pacific Bell. Adams continued to work at Pacific Bell until he was voluntarily downsized in 1995. He has lived in the San Francisco Bay area since 1979.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Danville, California
Date of Birth:
June 8, 1957
Place of Birth:
Catskill, New York
Education:
B.A., Hartwick College, 1979; M.B.A., University of California, Berkeley, 1986

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

God's Debris: A Thought Experiment 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Given the title, it's no great spoiler to point out that the basic idea underlying Adams' first major publication in the area of philosophy (in a Socratic dialogue no less!!) is pandeism. Pandeism is the belief that God became the Universe, generally through some form of transformative transfer enacting carefully crafted laws of physics. Adams employs a particularly violent take on this theme, which I won't give away here, not will I give away the mechanism Adams suggests for the restoration of the Universe to being God, also an element common to most strains of pandeism. Altogether an enjoyable discourse with characters just deep enough to make you forget that what you're really getting here is a philosophy lesson!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great book, gave it to several friends and we have had many a long discussion about it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Adams packs a lot in what seems to be a short story (I finished the entire book in under 2 hours). Most of the book is a philosphical discussion between a UPS delivery man and an old man (called the Avatar). The discussion is just as good as anything I have read by Plato (I am thinking of The Apology) and basically tries to define who is God and what is his purpose. Towards the end of the discussion, the Avatar gives the deliveryman some great advice about relationships and life. I really enjoyed Adam's preface at the beginning that basically tells you not to expect Dilbert or any comic moments like the Dilbert strips. Adams is excellent deviating from what he is known for.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although at times the story and character became dull, it was an overall good read. It makes you think.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I don't think the purpose of this book is to give the Great Answer to the Big Question it says just that on the back cover. For me, this book was made to make me think, or at least entertain me for a short while. After finishing the book, I came away from it with a smile on my face, because I had found something I was looking for. The way things are today, there are only two 'acceptable' answers to the Big Question. Here is a third answer that makes sense. This is not to say that the this third answer is the real Answer, but it proves the point that what we think we know now is based on what we can do now. There are answers to questions out there that we haven't even asked, simply because we don't know they can be asked. That is what this book says to me. A great read, but don't pick it apart trying to seperate fact from fiction. The fun of the book is that you forget about that distinction. And if you find it boring and useless, just remember that it was less than $15.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A delivery boy delivers a package to an old man and they end up having a philosophical discussion. But don't get me wrong, they may be doing nothing but talking but this book is anything but boring. It had me completely captivated from the first page. As someone who's done some intense thinking from a really young age, it's hard for me to be shocked by any new ideas so although it didn't surprise me with wild new ideas, it was pretty amazing how a few lines actually gave me goose bumps making me feel like I'd had some shocking new revelation. I absolutely loved the amazingly simplistic way in which Scott Adams presents some really complex ideas. This book is SO easy to read , it's an absolute DELITE. As I said, I read it twice in a row! If you love to think and have thought of everything, you'll find this intriguing little book highly entertaining and intellectually stimulating in a refreshingly relaxing way. If you don't like to think too much, you just might love this book even more because it certainly has the power to blow your mind.
Guest More than 1 year ago
God's Debris is a thought provoker. I would definetly recommend! This book was incredibly captivating. It is a theory presented in a story, and intricately ties details in amazing ways. I would recommend it to people of all faiths, all backgrounds, and all scientific beliefs. Further, I would recommend it for reading groups, because it is a book worth discussion.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought this book over a year ago and loaned it to a someone and they have not returned it. they loaned it to someone and they loaned it to someone else. we all know how it goes but this is one of the most thought invoking reads I have ever had the pleasure to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is the most idea provoking book i have ever read. When Adams say this is a god book to sit a discuss witha friend ...that is and understatment. Pick up a few bevrages. You will be talking for hours about the ideas brought about.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have to admit, I have the concentration span of a 1 yr. old at the best of times. This book sucked me in and helped me to relate my own thoughts and ideas to something that made sense. After reading this book I was able to put them together in a way that seemed clear. I read this book in just two hours. I just couldn't stop. It is compelling, humorous at times, and insightful.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I used to tell people i didnt have a favorite book, or movie, because i didnt like to limit myself to favorites when there are so many options...then i read this book and i thought it was wonderful...i started and finished this book in one night at work and i decided that i now have a favorite book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this book entertaining, compelling, and exciting all at once. It is definately a 'thinking' book and challenges our thinking ability in a way I've never encountered. (except for maybe, the Bible) I think this book borders on science fiction, but hate to label it so, for fear of scaring away science fiction critics. It is a sum of philosophy, physics, religion, relationships and the universe all in 132 pages. The 'old man' has a great teaching quality. He uses simple stories, parables, to convey his 'evidence' to the reader. Quite captivating! Even if the theories seemed remote. I look forward to a sequel??!
Guest More than 1 year ago
For those who love Dilbert, please realize that this book has nothing to do with that enjoyable character. There¿s also no humor here. Instead, you will find a fable that presents a unified theory of cosmology, religion, and knowledge. Before you get excited about all that you can learn, realize that this unified theory is deliberately flawed by Mr. Adams to provide you with a thought experiment to locate what is wrong with the argument. So the book is actually a brain teaser in its primary intent. It is a brain teaser that most people will find exceeds their knowledge of probability, physics, religion, philosophy, evolution, psychology and logic. So, to pick it apart you will probably need to assemble a team of people with deep knowledge in those areas. As a result, God¿s Debris is perfect for a serious book club. After understanding what¿s wrong with the arguments in the book, many will probably begin to see more unity in everything that happens based on a better platform of knowledge. That¿s well worthwhile. I found this book fascinating as a puzzle, and enjoyed picking the arguments and misstatements apart. It reminded me of a question on the bar exam from many years ago where I had to write about what the law was in regard to a will written by an illiterate person. Great fun! Mr. Adams warns that this book is for ¿people who enjoy having their brains spun around inside their skulls.¿ He also says that it is ¿a view about God that you¿ve probably never heard before.¿ I certainly agree with both of those points. He also warns that what¿s in the book ¿isn¿t true . . . but it¿s oddly compelling.¿ He also notes that people under the age of 14 should not read it. Although he doesn¿t say why, anyone who reads this book without a foundation in the subjects described may actually believe what¿s proposed by the Avatar. The world has enough false beliefs in it. I applaud Mr. Adams for helping to avoid creating any more. After this book has honed your knowledge and critical thinking skills, I suggest that you take arguments that you read in other books and practice seeing what is wrong with them. All nonfiction books provide thought experiments of that sort! I do hope Mr. Adams will write another of these thought experiments. Overcome the appeal of simplicity to see through to the dynamic reality! Donald Mitchell, co-author of The Irresistible Growth Enterprise and The 2,000 Percent Solution
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you're looking for a watered-down version of fundamental theories that have been around for centuries, then this book is for you! Adams is seriously over-estimating himself when he claims that 'the book will make your brain spin around inside your skull.' The fact that the book is fiction mixed with fact is supposed to be fun, b/c you can try and figure out what's fact and what's made up (or something), which was only frustrating for me. If this book is thought provoking for you, you have obviously never read a book on basic philosophy. I should have been tipped off by the fact that this was the #1 e-book on the planet.