God's Glory in Salvation Through Judgment: A Biblical Theology

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Overview

In Exodus 34 Moses asks to see God’s glory, and God reveals himself as a God who is merciful and just. James Hamilton Jr. contends that from this passage comes a biblical theology that unites the meta-narrative of Scripture under one central theme: God’s glory in salvation through judgment.

Hamilton begins in the Old Testament by showing that Israel was saved through God’s judgment on the Egyptians and the Caananites. God was glorified through both his judgment and mercy, ...

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God's Glory in Salvation through Judgment: A Biblical Theology

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Overview

In Exodus 34 Moses asks to see God’s glory, and God reveals himself as a God who is merciful and just. James Hamilton Jr. contends that from this passage comes a biblical theology that unites the meta-narrative of Scripture under one central theme: God’s glory in salvation through judgment.

Hamilton begins in the Old Testament by showing that Israel was saved through God’s judgment on the Egyptians and the Caananites. God was glorified through both his judgment and mercy, accorded in salvation to Israel. The New Testament unfolds the ultimate display of God’s glory in justice and mercy, as it was God’s righteous judgment shown on the cross that brought us salvation. God’s glory in salvation through judgment will be shown at the end of time, when Christ returns to judge his enemies and save all who have called on his name.

Hamilton moves through the Bible book by book, showing that there is one theological center to the whole Bible. The volume’s systematic method and scope make it a unique resource for pastors, professors, and students.

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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher

“I was riveted. Never do I sit down and read sixty pages of ANY book that I get in the mail. But I could not stop—could not stop reading and could not stop rejoicing over God’s Glory in Salvation through Judgment. It is the kind of overview of redemptive history Edwards wanted to write. It’s what I hoped would be written.”
John Piper, Founder, desiringGod.org; Chancellor, Bethlehem College and Seminary

“As readers of Scripture we long to know the message of the Bible as a whole. We do not want to miss the forest for the trees. Unfortunately, there are few books that help us to be faithful to the whole counsel of God. What a delight, then, to read Jim Hamilton’s book where the story line of the Scriptures is unfolded. Hamilton rightly sees that the glory of God is at the center of the scriptural record, demonstrating with careful attention to the biblical text the supremacy of God in both the Old Testament and the New. Scholars, students, and laypeople will all profit from reading this work, which instructs the mind, enlivens the heart, and summons us to obedience.”
Thomas R. Schreiner, James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

“In an era when centers in general no longer hold, Hamilton makes a strong case for the centrality to biblical theology of what C. H. Dodd called the ‘two-beat rhythm’ of biblical history: salvation through judgment. Hamilton discovers this theme in every book of the Bible and argues that it is the heartbeat of God’s ultimate purpose: the publication of his glory. In seeking to do justice to scriptural unity and diversity alike, Hamilton’s work represents biblical theology at its best.”
Kevin J. Vanhoozer, Research Professor of Systematic Theology, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School

“Centered on the important themes of salvation and judgment, Hamilton’s book models well how a thematic approach toward biblical theology might be applied to the whole of Scripture. It is to be warmly welcomed as an invitation to reflect on biblical truth and an opportunity to dialogue on how the unity of the Old and New Testaments may be articulated best.”
T. Desmond Alexander, Senior Lecturer in Biblical Studies and Director of Postgraduate Studies, Union Theological College

“Who said that the search for a center in biblical theology is a dead end? In this bold and courageous book, which deals with the entire Bible, James Hamilton Jr. dons the mantle of an explorer in search of the holy grail of biblical theology. As he journeys through the Bible, there are many sights in the biblical landscape that will arrest the attention of those who accompany him, including the pivotal revelation of God in Exodus 34:6–7. Hamilton’s thoughtful analysis and reflection provide many insights into the biblical text. While you may not agree with all of his conclusions, you won’t come back from your journey with him without a greater sense of God’s majesty and glory. Rather than being a dead end, this is a gateway into a new world.”
Stephen G. Dempster, Professor of Religious Studies, Crandall University

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781581349764
  • Publisher: Crossway Books
  • Publication date: 11/30/2010
  • Pages: 639
  • Sales rank: 709,231
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

James M. Hamilton Jr. (PhD, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is associate professor of biblical theology at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and preaching pastor at Kenwood Baptist Church. He is the author of God's Glory in Salvation through Judgment and the Revelation volume in the Preaching the Word commentary series.

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  • Posted January 6, 2011

    Recommended for anyone interested in Biblical Theology.

    With God's Glory In Salvation Through Judgment, James Hamilton has waded into the centuries-long debate concerning the center of biblical theology. Hamilton responds to many contemporary scholars who have abandoned the quest for a center to biblical theology with the thesis that God's glory in salvation through judgment constitutes that center. While the beginning and ending chapters discuss the nature of the debate, the greatest portion of the book "highlights the central theme of God's glory in salvation through judgment by describing the literary contours of individual books in canonical context with sensitivity to the unfolding metanarrative" (44). However one views the merits of positing THE central theme to biblical theology, Hamilton's chief contribution is in tracking THIS theme throughout the canonical texts. Hamilton makes a strong case that God's glory in salvation through judgment is, at the very least, one of the primary themes of scripture. A comprehensive biblical theology of this theme is therefore an important contribution towards balancing a big-picture understanding while studying particular books. God's Glory In Salvation Through Judgment could therefore serve as a "big-picture" reference tool to anyone studying the themes of God's glory, salvation, or judgment. Many proposed centers of biblical theology have sunk in the quicksand of the wisdom literature. While Hamilton's thesis sputters a bit in the wisdom literature, it fairs far better than many other purposed centers and remains viable. An example of this viability is Hamilton's observation that the book of Job addresses the "mysterious, hidden nature of the justice and mercy of God" (305). Hamilton's interaction with the Song of Songs is not as strong. He makes recourse to the serpent-seed motif of Genesis and the Song of Songs as a picture of the reversal of "the outworkings of the curses on the land and gender relations" (305). This understanding is problematic because the biblical writer does not employ many lexical links that would clue the reader into this intended connection. Although Hamilton similarly imports the serpent-seed motif of Genesis elsewhere, only in Song of Songs is it an important support for his thesis. The only other problematic aspect of Hamilton's work is he often seems to uncritically accept suggested chiastic structures when outlining a particular book. The most glaring example is in the book of Revelation (544). Although the questionable chiastic structure supports his thesis, in a book such as Revelation God's glory in salvation through judgment is so strong that even reservedly offering such a questionable chiasm detracts from his argument. The above weaknesses aside, Hamilton fastidiously avoids side issues and continually draws the data back to the proposed theme. The result is not only a strong argument but a cohesive work despite its large scope. Readers will benefit from Hamilton's contribution to biblical theology even if they are not fully convinced of his proposed center. Hamilton powerfully argues that God's glory in salvation through judgment permeates the canon of scripture.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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