God's Good World: Reclaiming the Doctrine of Creation

God's Good World: Reclaiming the Doctrine of Creation

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by Jonathan R. Wilson
     
 

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The doctrine of creation has often been neglected in Christian theology. Distinguished evangelical theologian Jonathan Wilson exposes what has been missing in current theological discourse and offers an original, constructive work on this doctrine.

The book unites creation and redemption, showing the significance of God's work of creation for understanding the good

Overview

The doctrine of creation has often been neglected in Christian theology. Distinguished evangelical theologian Jonathan Wilson exposes what has been missing in current theological discourse and offers an original, constructive work on this doctrine.

The book unites creation and redemption, showing the significance of God's work of creation for understanding the good news of redemption in Jesus Christ. Wilson develops a trinitarian account of the life of the world and sets forth how to live wisely, hopefully, peaceably, joyfully, and generously in that world. He also shows how a mature doctrine of creation can help the church think practically about contemporary issues, including creation care, sexuality, technology, food and water, and more.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
As the creation vs. evolution controversy rages on, each side appeals to science to buttress its claims. In this fine work, author Wilson (Living Faithfully in a Fragmented World) insists that the questions are theological rather than scientific. At the outset, Wilson states his premise: that it is impossible to understand the doctrine of creation unless it is placed in the context of the doctrine of redemption. The two ideas, he insists, are mutually dependent—one without the other lacks the integrity and vigor of an authentic spiritual understanding. The author, a theologian at Carey Theological Seminary, approaches his subject from the standpoint of a committed disciple, one who has come to recognize the desperate need of the modern church to reclaim the creation narratives as expressions of Israel’s redemptive experience. “Christians should have a lively, disruptive, alternative account of reality created not by our technology but given by the Triune Creator and Redeemer,” he writes. It is only in the context of this reality that the church can fully comprehend the immensity of God. (Apr.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801038815
Publisher:
Baker Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/15/2013
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.90(d)

Meet the Author

Jonathan R. Wilson (PhD, Duke University) is Pioneer McDonald Professor of Theology at Carey Theological College in Vancouver, British Columbia. He previously taught at Acadia Divinity College and Westmont College and has served as a pastor. He is the author of numerous books, including Living Faithfully in a Fragmented World, A Primer for Christian Doctrine, and God So Loved the World.

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God's Good World: Reclaiming the Doctrine of Creation 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
dgregoryburns More than 1 year ago
I have been waiting for a book like “God’s Good World” for years.  I remember, when in seminary, reading books like the “Goldsworthy Trilogy” and “Creation Regained” and they transformed forever how I looked at redemption.  Well, Jonathan Wilson has brought together through his pen forth the best book I have read that reminds us that to fully grasp Christ’s work of redemption one must begin – as the Biblical narrative itself does – with the doctrine of creation.   I think it was Al Wolters in his influentialCreation Regained (Eerdmans; $15.00) who quipped that a robust doctrine of creation is useful for more than defeating evolutionists, and, in fact, includes the structures and institutions built into the created order (like, say, obviously, family and government or the possibility for art and science, work and recreation) and not just rocks, bears and galaxies. To have a full-orbed and fully fruitful view of creation, we will have to examine all the implications of the reality, and this fine book takes up this challenge wonderfully. The book has, overall received rave reviews from multiple corners of the Church.  Old Testament scholar Tremper Longman said that “In the current discussions concerning the biblical doctrine of creation, we often bypass what is most important to us as Christians as we debate the issues like the age of the earth or the length of creation days. Jonathan Wilson corrects this oversight as he masterfully guides us to a rich appreciation of God as our Creator and Redeemer.”   This is a great book and, in closing, I would like to say that it not only unlocks vital insights about the nature of creation, and the implications of living in a created reality but it points us towards the very character of a God who is a creator.  Solid.  Wise.  Encouraging.