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God's Hazard
     

God's Hazard

by Nicholas Mosley
 

Paradoxes of Peace continues the meditation of Mosley's Time at War, at the end of which he wrote that humans find themselves at home in war because they feel they know what they have to do, whereas in peace they have to discover this. But what should inform them--custom? need? duty? ambition? desire? Forces pull in different directions--fidelity versus

Overview

Paradoxes of Peace continues the meditation of Mosley's Time at War, at the end of which he wrote that humans find themselves at home in war because they feel they know what they have to do, whereas in peace they have to discover this. But what should inform them--custom? need? duty? ambition? desire? Forces pull in different directions--fidelity versus adventurousness, probity versus fun. During the war, Mosley found himself having to combine fondness for his father, Oswald Mosley, with the need to speak out against his post-war politics. In times of peace, his love for his wife and children, too, seemed riddled with paradoxes. He sought answers in Christianity, but came to see organized religion as primarily a social institution. How does caring not become a trap?

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

An utterly fascinating piece of British literature, "Paradoxes of Peace" is a fine and highly recommended entry into any philosophical collection.' -The Free Library

Dalkey Archive Press

Publishers Weekly

English novelist Mosley (Hopeful Monsters) explores the nature of free will in this playful but often frustrating allegory of God's exasperation with the humans he created. In the Garden of Eden, the Old Man must figure out how to eject his children, Adam and Eve, from home in a way that allows them to get on with their lives, but also not resent the Old Man and his wife, Lilith. Adam is a writer whose narrative becomes his creative maneuvering out of the Garden and into the chance encounters and lucky turns that life offers. Adam's daughter, Sophie, and her two friends, Aisha and Amelie, are the plucky protagonists of these subsequent adventures, traveling to the Middle East, where they learn firsthand of the hostilities between nations, people and religions that render the world perilous and unstable. The God-given human freedom that these characters enjoy inevitably comes with risks, though each of the young women helps repair some of the ancient rancor. Mosley's tale of deep ideas meanders pleasantly, but frequently veers out of his control. (Mar.)

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New York Times
When unmistakably brilliant writing is combined with natural insight, the result is likely to be most impressive. Nicholas Mosley writes realistically, with an admirable craft and surging talent.
Tom LeClair
Dalkey Archive has in the English author Nicholas Mosley a throwback, a modernist mastodon whose project for fiction surpasses in grandiosity that of any American writer I know.
Washington Post
Robert Nye
Mosley is that rare bird: an English writer whose imagination is genuinely inspired by intellectual conundrums.
Guardian
Robert Scholes
Nicholas Mosley is a brilliant novelist who has received nothing like the recognition he deserves—either at home in England or in this country.
Saturday Review
Library Journal

This latest from Mosley (The Hesperides Tree) tells the story of Adam, a writer concerned with the characterization of God in the book of Genesis as a punishing father figure. In an attempt to understand this portrayal, Adam rewrites the story of Genesis in relation to his daughter Sophie. Much like Mosley's other works, this novel poses serious philosophical issues, exploring the paradoxical issue of human freedom and determinism in depth. Each character struggles to search for new understanding within existing circumstances. Through this sense of the manifold possibilities yet to be discovered, Mosley gives the reader a glimpse into a world rich with complexity and chance. As a corollary, his fiction is sardonically vague and resistant to simplistic interpretation. Overall, Mosley asks the same thing of his readers as he does of the characters in his novel: to question certainty with what they've learned from experience. Recommended for all public libraries, particularly where philosophical and experimental fiction is appreciated.
—Joshua Finnell

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781564785404
Publisher:
Dalkey Archive Press
Publication date:
03/26/2009
Series:
British Literature Series
Pages:
199
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.57(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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Meet the Author

Born in London, Mosley was educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford and served in Italy during the Second World War, winning the Military Cross for bravery. He succeeded as 3rd Baron Ravensdale in 1966 and, on the death of his father on 3 December 1980, he also succeeded to the Baronetcy. His father, Sir Oswald Mosley, founded the British Union of Fascists in 1932 and was a supporter of Benito Mussolini. Sir Oswald was arrested in 1940 for his antiwar campaigning, and spent the majority of World War II in prison. As an adult, Nicholas was a harsh critic of his father in "Beyond the Pale: Sir Oswald Mosley and Family 1933-1980" (1983), calling into question his father's motives and understanding of politics. Nicholas' work contributed to the 1998 Channel 4 television programme titled 'Mosley' based on his father's life. At the end of the mini-series, Nicholas is portrayed meeting his father in prison to ask him about his national allegiance. Mosley began to stammer as a young boy, and attended weekly sessions with speech therapist Lionel Logue in order to help him overcome the speech disorder. Mosley says his father claimed never really to have noticed his stammer, but feels Sir Oswald may have been less aggressive when speaking to him than he was towards other people as a result.

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