Going Buddhist

Going Buddhist

by Peter J. Conradi
     
 
It often takes a crisis to see what a life's shape has been, to show what really matters. For Peter Conradi, the moment came in 1982. This is his account of the new life-journey he embarked on back then. It is a self-help book for cynics, totally unpatronising, full of wise comedy, in which it quickly becomes clear that 'going Buddhist' is neither a quick fix, nor a

Overview

It often takes a crisis to see what a life's shape has been, to show what really matters. For Peter Conradi, the moment came in 1982. This is his account of the new life-journey he embarked on back then. It is a self-help book for cynics, totally unpatronising, full of wise comedy, in which it quickly becomes clear that 'going Buddhist' is neither a quick fix, nor a one-shot deal. The book is dedicated to the memory of his friend and mentor. Iris Murdoch, with whom over many years Conradi discussed the meaning of religion, its place in the world, and the Buddhist pursuit of 'Good'. Drawing on these conversations, and the remarkable letters they exchanged, he seeks to explain the beauty of Buddhism, a religion now more relevant than ever to Westerners, perishing from the nihilism of the age.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
Observing that "Buddhist meditation has been seen as at best a harmless mystical preoccupation, at worst a socially irresponsible self-indulgence," Conradi (Iris Murdoch) offers an idiosyncratic and unpretentious look at his experience as a practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism. Born into "an assimilated Jewish family," Conradi frequently uses conversations and correspondence shared with British novelist Iris Murdoch-a self-described "Christian-Buddhist"-as catalysts to explore such matters as the experience of meditating, going on retreat, Buddhism's introduction to the West, teachings such as the Four Noble Truths and "positive emptiness" and the career of legendary Tibetan Buddhist teacher Chogyam Trungpa. Although the book contends that improving oneself by "going Buddhist" is "neither a quick fix, nor a one-shot deal," Conradi wades with clarity and ease into heady waters and delivers substantive Buddhist reflection in a manner that is both accessible and enjoyable. He accomplishes this through a close attention to detail and a delectable wit (on the promise of reincarnation: "being born once seems to me a sufficient delight"). The text is perhaps too laden with literary allusions, and at times it becomes downright rambly; nevertheless, Conradi provides a substantial, provocative primer that will appeal to the novice and accomplished practitioner alike. (Feb.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal - Library Journal
Conradi, the author of biographies and studies of Iris Murdoch, and most recently of Hitler's Piano Player, has written a fluent, engaging, highly personal account of his 20-year relationship with Buddhism. Conradi does not evade the difficulties and internal contradictions of Buddhism; his book includes reproductions of the famous "Ox-herding pictures," which facilitate insight and meditation. Readers of a literary bent will be pleased by glimpses of Murdoch: snippets of Conradi's discussions of Buddhism with her over many years enliven the text and add to our understanding of both her and Buddhism. For most collections. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781904095637
Publisher:
Short Books, Limited
Publication date:
03/01/2005
Pages:
188
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.27(h) x (d)

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