Going Coed: Women's Experiences in Formerly Men's Colleges and Universities, 1950-2000

Overview

More than a quarter-century ago, the last great wave of coeducation in the United States resulted in the admission of women to almost all of the remaining men's colleges and universities. In thirteen original essays, Going Coed investigates the reasons behind this important phenomenon, describes how institutions have dealt with the changes, and captures the experiences of women who attended these schools.

Informed by a wealth of fresh research, the book is rich in both ...

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Overview

More than a quarter-century ago, the last great wave of coeducation in the United States resulted in the admission of women to almost all of the remaining men's colleges and universities. In thirteen original essays, Going Coed investigates the reasons behind this important phenomenon, describes how institutions have dealt with the changes, and captures the experiences of women who attended these schools.

Informed by a wealth of fresh research, the book is rich in both historical and sociological insights. In exploring specific cases, the essays illuminate such key issues as the impact of the women's movement and the development of women's studies as an academic discipline, the pressures exerted on institutions by economic necessities and legal challenges, and the strategies women have utilized in adapting to formerly all-male environments. In their conclusion, the editors synthesize some common trends among the case studies and assess what remains to be done to achieve gender equity in higher education.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
The essays in Miller-Bernal and Poulson's book give a terrific introduction to the messy process of integrating colleges and universities.
Feminist Collections

[Miller-Bernal and Poulson] bring into better focus one part of the larger story about educational equality than has previously been scattered. [...] GOING COED is essential reading for all interested in educational arrangements that produce equal opportunities for all students, faculty, and administrators associated wth higher education.
Teachers College Record

Careful organization and wide coverage constitute impressive strengths of this book. . . . Going Coed is a strong and important addition to literature on gender in higher education and to the small corpus on post-World War II educational history.
The Review of Higher Education

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780826514493
  • Publisher: Vanderbilt University Press
  • Publication date: 7/28/2004
  • Pages: 392
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Leslie Miller-Bernal is a professor of sociology at Wells College and the author of Separate by Degree: Women Students' Experiences in Women's and Coeducational Colleges.

Susan L. Poulson teaches history at the University of Scranton. She is now collaborating with Miller-Bernal on a study of how women's colleges have responded to the challenge of coeducation since the 1960s.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Preface

Section I The History of Coeducation

Chapter 1
Introduction 1
Coeducation: An Uneven Progression Leslie Miller-Bernal

Chapter 2
Two Unique Histories of Coeducation:
Catholic and Historically Black Institutions Susan L. Poulson and Leslie Miller-Bernal

Section II Coeducation before the Late 1960s

Chapter 3
To Coeducation and Back Again:
Gender and Organization at the University of Rochester Christine Lundt, Susan L. Poulson, and Leslie Miller-Bernal

Chapter 4
A Historically Black Men's College Admits Women:
The Case of Lincoln University Leslie Miller-Bernal and Susan Gunn Pevar

Section III Conversion to Coeducation in the Ivy League

Chapter 5
A Friendly Rivalry:
Yale and Princeton Pursue Parallel Paths to Coeducation Marcia Synnott

Chapter 6
"Men of Dartmouth" and "The Lady Engineers":
Coeducation at Dartmouth College and Lehigh University Mary Frances Donley Forcier

Section IV Masculine Cultures and Traditions

Chapter 7
Women's Admission to the University of Virginia:
Tradition Transformed Elizabeth L. Ihle

Chapter 8
Coeducation but Not Equal Opportunity Loretta Higgins

Section V Structural Arrangements

Chapter 9
A Religious and a Public University:
The Transitions to Coeducation at Georgetown and Rutgers Susan L. Poulson

Chapter 10
Coeducation after a Decade of Coordination:
The Case of Hamilton College Leslie Miller-Bernal

Section VI Coeducation beyond Liberal Arts

Chapter 11
"Toxic Virus" or Lady Virtue:
Gender Integration and Assimilation at West Point and VMI Diane Diamond and Michael Kimmel

Chapter 12
Women's Movement into Technical Fields:
A Comparison of Technical and Community Colleges Regina Deil-Amen

Chapter 13
Conclusion:
Coeducation and Gender Equal Education Susan L. Poulson and Leslie Miller-Bernal

Contributors

Index

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