Going Home: Jesus and Buddha as Brothers [NOOK Book]

Overview

Exiled from Vietnam over thirty years ago, Thich Nhat Hanh has become known as a healer of the heart, a monk who shows us how the everyday world can both enrich and endanger our spiritual lives. In Going Home he shows us the relationship between Buddha and Jesus by presenting a conversation between the two. In this unique way we learn how such concepts as resurrection and mindfulness converge. The brotherhood between Jesus and Buddha can teach us to "practice in such a way that Buddha is born every moment of our ...
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Going Home: Jesus and Buddha as Brothers

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Overview

Exiled from Vietnam over thirty years ago, Thich Nhat Hanh has become known as a healer of the heart, a monk who shows us how the everyday world can both enrich and endanger our spiritual lives. In Going Home he shows us the relationship between Buddha and Jesus by presenting a conversation between the two. In this unique way we learn how such concepts as resurrection and mindfulness converge. The brotherhood between Jesus and Buddha can teach us to "practice in such a way that Buddha is born every moment of our daily life, that Jesus Christ is born every moment of our daily life."
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In this short treatise, Vietnamese Buddhist monk Hanh continues the ecumenical dialogue he began in 1995's Living Buddha, Living Christ. The chapters evolved from talks he gave at Plum Village, Hanh's Buddhist retreat center located in the heart of Christian France. In ecumenical fashion, Hanh does not encourage conversion to Buddhism or any other religion but tells followers to bloom where they're planted, cultivating a "mindfulness" in their own religious traditions. Unfortunately, Hanh often seems to imply that for Buddhists and Christians to talk to one another, they must first soft-pedal or ignore those beliefs that make them discrete in the first place. He considers it a waste of time to discuss "whether God is a person or not a person," although the Incarnation question carries profound weight in Christianity; he also asserts that "nothing can come from nothing," although creatio ex nihilo is a fundamental Christian tenet. Buddhism is better understood in these pages, but distinctive Buddhist beliefs can also stand in the way, says Hanh: individuals can become too attached to their own ideas of nirvana, forgetting that "nirvana means extinction of all notions." Despite Hanh's tendency to ignore significant differences between Buddhism and Christianity, his book speaks powerfully about the need for tolerance and love in overcoming those differences. (Sept.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Thich Nhat Hanh, now in his seventies, became a Buddhist monk in Vietnam at the tender age of 16. His unremitting struggles for peace in that war-ravaged land brought exile but also close relationships with Western Christians, such as Thomas Merton and Martin Luther King Jr., who were also opposed to the war. From these early contacts, Thich Nhat Hanh developed an understanding that both Buddhists and Christians have much to gain from encounters between their two traditions. This beautiful and inspiring gift to all seeking a more meaningful spirituality offers the revered teacher's dharma talks, presented to Christian and Buddhist seekers during the Christmas seasons of 1995, 1996, and 1997. These lessons focus on the difficult but essential tasks of developing both personal and cultural peace while further illuminating those deep intersections between Buddhism and Christianity examined in the author's best-selling Living Buddha, Living Christ (LJ 10/1/95). Essential for collections on popular religion.--James R. Kuhlman, Univ. of North Carolina Lib., Asheville Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Following up on his Living Buddha, Living Christ, Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh's newest book explores the connections between Buddhism and Christianity. In a series of pithy addresses, the author, a Vietnamese monk, considers, inter alia, the similarities between the Christian practice of baptism and the Buddhist practice of taking refuge. Thich Nhat Hanh captures his assessment of the two traditions' compatibility in a culinary metaphor: a fan of French cuisine can also love Chinese food. To support his conclusion that there is "no conflict at all between the Buddha and the Christ in me," he sometimes describes Christianity in terms that many Christian readers might not recognize, such as when he asserts that "all of us are Jesus." But the author's overarching point stands: in the late 20th century, both Buddhism and Christianity are struggling to maintain meaningful presences in the world. Rather than see each other as antagonists, Buddhists and Christians should learn from each other, and work together in the pursuit of common goals. Sure to appeal to New Age dabblers, but with enough meat to attract serious students as well, this is a valuable addition to the growing literature on these two religious traditions.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781440673122
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/1/2000
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 342,413
  • File size: 148 KB

Meet the Author

Thich Nhat Hanh has been living
in exile from his native Vietnam since the age of forty. In that year of 1966, he was
banned by both the non-Communist and Communist governments for his role in
undermining the violence he saw affecting his people. A Buddhist monk since the age of
sixteen, Thay ("teacher," as he is commonly known to followers) earned a reputation as a
respected writer, scholar, and leader. He championed a movement known as "engaged
Buddhism," which intertwined traditional meditative practices with active nonviolent
civil disobedience. This movement lay behind the establishment of the most influential
center of Buddhist studies in Saigon, the An Quang Pagoda. He also set up relief
organizations to rebuild destroyed villages, instituted the School of Youth for Social
Service (a Peace Corps of sorts for Buddhist peace workers), founded a peace magazine,
and urged world leaders to use nonviolence as a tool. Although his struggle for
cooperation meant he had to relinquish a homeland, it won him accolades around the
world.



When Thich Nhat Hanh left Vietnam, he embarked on a mission to spread Buddhist
thought around the globe. In 1966, when Thay came to the United States for the first of
many humanitarian visits, the territory was not completely new to him: he had
experienced American culture before as a student at Princeton, and more recently as a
professor at Columbia. The Fellowship of Reconciliation and Cornell invited Thay to
speak on behalf of Buddhist monks, and he offered an enlightened view on ways to end
the Vietnam conflict. He spoke on college campuses, met with administration officials,
and impressed social dignitaries. The following year, Nobel Peace Prize winner Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr., nominated Thich Nhat Hanh for the same honor. Hanh's
Buddhist delegation to the Paris peace talks resulted in accords between North Vietnam
and the United States, but his pacifist efforts did not end with the war. He also helped
organize rescue missions well into the 1970's for Vietnamese trying to escape from
political oppression. Even after the political stabilization of Vietnam, Thich Nhat Hanh
has not been allowed to return home. The government still sees him as a threat-ironic,
when one considers the subjects of his teachings: respect for life, generosity, responsible
sexual behavior, loving communication, and cultivation of a healthful life style.



Thay now lives in southwestern France, where he founded a retreat center twelve
years ago. At the center, Plum Village, he continues to teach, write, and garden. Plum
Village houses only thirty monks, nuns, and laypeople, but thousands from around the
globe call it home. Accommodation is readily available for short-term visitors seeking
spiritual relief, for refugees in transit, or for activists in need of inspiration. Thich Nhat
Hanh gathers people of diverse nationalities, races, religions, and sexes in order to expose
them to mindfulness-taking care in the present moment, being profoundly aware and
appreciative of life.



Despite the fact that Thay is nearing seventy, his strength as a world leader and
spiritual guide grows. He has written more than seventy-five books of prose, poetry, and
prayers. Most of his works have been geared toward the Buddhist reader, yet his
teachings appeal to a wide audience. For at least a decade, Thich Nhat Hanh has visited
the United States every other year; he draws more and more people with each tour,
Christian, Jewish, atheist, and Zen Buddhist alike. His philosophy is not limited to
preexistent religious structures, but speaks to the individual's desire for wholeness and
inner calm. In 1993, he drew a crowd of some 1,200 people at the National Cathedral in
Washington DC, led a retreat of 500 people in upstate New York, and assembled 300
people in West Virginia. His popularity in the United States inspired the mayor of
Berkeley, California, to name a day in his honor and the Mayor of New York City
declared a Day of Reconciliation during his 1993 visit. Clearly, Thich Nhat Hanh is a
human link with a prophetic past, a soft-spoken advocate of peace, Buddhist community,
and the average American citizen.
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Table of Contents

Introduction
1 The Birth of Understanding 1
2 Going Home 39
3 Let the Child Be Born to Us 66
4 Seeking the Dharma Body, the Body of Truth 109
5 The Meaning of Love 144
6 Jesus and Buddha as Brothers 171
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 9 of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2006

    Interesting

    I know a lot about Christian and Buddhist issues this book is a great reference. It was a wonderful experience to see my beliefs described in this book...in the right words.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful Book Regarding Jesus and Buddha

    This is a wonderful book regarding the relationship between Buddhism and Christianity by Thich Nhat Hahn. The literature is very stimulation to the mind. It relaxes the soul and sends a feeling of tranquility. One must read this text to understand the practice and principles stated by Hanh. This is a must read and comes highly recommended.
    "Epulaeryu Master."

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2007

    Simply Awesome

    The greatest explanation for being able to be botha Christian and a student of Buddhism at the same time. Hanh has been my favorite author for some time and has been a joy to read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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