Going Live: Getting the News Right in a Real-Time, Online World / Edition 1

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Overview

Live! Breaking story! Up-to-the-minute coverage! We hear these teasers every day. But do they always guide us to real news? With the explosive growth of online news and increased barrage of sensational live shots on TV, getting a story first seems more important than getting it right. In Going Live, veteran journalist Philip Seib warns of the dangers of trivialized news and sloppy ethics in this Onew newsO age. Whether you love or hate the news media, this is an indispensable look at where journalism is heading_and how we can sort out whatOs important and accurate in the news we get in an ever-faster moving stream.
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Editorial Reviews

CHOICE
This thoughtful, readable book covers almost every aspect of what is happening—and Seib expects to happen—to journalism in the 21st century.
The Washington Post
Seib, an experienced newsman . . . manages to say a great deal in a very few pages; Going Live is not merely usefully instructive, it also suggests that the future of American journalism is brighter than pessimists tend to believe.
— Jonathan Yardley
Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly
The type of audience that might be especially interested in this book would be undergraduates in an introduction to mass communication course. The book has the right blend of high profile examples, behind-the-scenes details, and attention to technological issues to make it a useful addition to an undergraduate's personal library.
The Dallas Morning News
Cogent and solidly researched. . . . Evolving journalists especially need to ponder the questions Mr. Seib raises about rushing to judgment in an information age where it always seems to be rush hour.
Booklist
A compelling look at how news gathering is changing, for better and worse.
Fort Worth Star-Telegram
Phil Seib has a great new book.
Richmond Times
A thoughtful and important book of great value both to reporters and to citizens who read their words and hear their broadcasts. Rarely does an academic writer have such a clear grasp of what it means to work in a newsroom, and rarely can one do as well in making such experiences come alive for a reader.
ForeWord Reviews
Going Live is a thoughtful examination of recent changes in the news media. What makes this book so thought-provoking is the author's exploration of the relationships between forms of media.
Television Quarterly
Those in the profession, practitioners and scholars . . . as well as the general public, will want to read this book about where the media are headed. Seib's work is excitingly written as well as solidly based. He sees ahead of the curve, and he doggedly defends the tradtional values of journalism.
Online Journalism Review
Seib offers broad coverage of most of the standard online journalism issues in a skillful combination of good real-world cases and thoughtful (but not lengthy) analysis. A very readable book for a survey course, with excellent fuel for discussions. . . . A good second text for an ethics course.
— Mindy McAdams
Poynter.Org
Listed in Poynter.org's Journalism Resource Center
— Bruce Garrison
Harvard International Journal Of Press/Politics
Detailing the history and consequences of the real-time revolution in journalism, Seib provides an engaing overview of ways that live reporting has affected what we get from the news. Focusing on Internet journalism, live broadcasts, and digital convergence in the news industry, the book's lively prose and colorful anecdotes make this a good choice for introducing general readers and undergraduate students to the issues confronting journalists in an age when the shelf life of a story is measured in minutes rather than days.
Choice
This thoughtful, readable book covers almost every aspect of what is happening—and Seib expects to happen—to journalism in the 21st century.
Harvard International Journal of Press/Politics
Detailing the history and consequences of the real-time revolution in journalism, Seib provides an engaing overview of ways that live reporting has affected what we get from the news. Focusing on Internet journalism, live broadcasts, and digital convergence in the news industry, the book's lively prose and colorful anecdotes make this a good choice for introducing general readers and undergraduate students to the issues confronting journalists in an age when the shelf life of a story is measured in minutes rather than days.
The Washington Post - Jonathan Yardley
Seib, an experienced newsman . . . manages to say a great deal in a very few pages; Going Live is not merely usefully instructive, it also suggests that the future of American journalism is brighter than pessimists tend to believe.
Robert Mong
Philip Seib has produced an important book, one that I hope reaches both general and professional audiences. Every page in this timely book contains something worthwhile for the reader.
Barbara Cochran
Philip Seib paints a vivid picture of the changing media landscape and the implications for the future. He raises important questions about what role journalists will play and very soundly concludes that, in spite of all the changes wrought by new technology, traditional journalistic values must be relied upon and applied.
Mark Stencel
At a time when front-page news can't keep up with homepage news, Philip Seib has taken the time to carefully consider the impact of technology, competition, and business pressure on the continuous deadlines that almost all journalists now face. Like an airborne TV camera crew, Seib follows the high-speed chase for real-time news, but with all the perspective and detail that consumers should rightly expect from any editorial coverage they read or watch—in print, on the air, and online.
Online Journalism Review - Mindy McAdams
Seib offers broad coverage of most of the standard online journalism issues in a skillful combination of good real-world cases and thoughtful (but not lengthy) analysis. A very readable book for a survey course, with excellent fuel for discussions. . . . A good second text for an ethics course.
Poynter.Org - Bruce Garrison
Listed in Poynter.org's Journalism Resource Center
Richmond Times-Dispatch
A thoughtful and important book of great value both to reporters and to citizens who read their words and hear their broadcasts. Rarely does an academic writer have such a clear grasp of what it means to work in a newsroom, and rarely can one do as well in making such experiences come alive for a reader.
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
The type of audience that might be especially interested in this book would be undergraduates in an introduction to mass communication course. The book has the right blend of high profile examples, behind-the-scenes details, and attention to technological issues to make it a useful addition to an undergraduate's personal library.
Booknews
Seib (journalism, Marquette University) warns of the dangers of trivialized news and shoddy ethics. He assesses the current state of journalism and considers the future of the profession, while offering advice on understanding the news we see. Specific chapters focus on the impact of live coverage, the effect of recent technological changes on print media, and ethics. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Kirkus Reviews
Seib (Campaigns and Conscience, not reviewed) examines the professional, commercial, and ethical pressures on the news media exerted by technologies that make the delivery of information both instantaneous and global. The author worries about the news media's pervasive preference for reporting events as they are happening:"Going live," he says,"is exciting and dramatic. But is it good journalism?" His answer, of course, is primarily negative. Unfolding news is news that by definition has not emerged from an editorial process and thereby makes difficult if not impossible the application of the standards of impartiality that have long been the hallmarks of principled journalism. A number of Seib's questions are patently rhetorical—e.g.,"Should emphasis on speed of delivery override judgments about relevance and taste?" Nonetheless, he raises enough serious questions about the rapidly changing news business to sober anyone but Matt Drudge (who appears throughout as a sort of cyber-bogeyman whose gleeful disregard for traditional journalistic ethics Seib finds most reprehensible). One of the author's principal objectives is to outline the concept of"convergence"—what he considers the inevitable fusion of print, cable television, and Internet news media. He sketches the obvious advantages to consumers of this imminent merger (improvements in"interactivity" and in the dissemination—via online links—of vast amounts of supplementary information) but warns that editorial discretion must play a more prominent role than it currently does among electronic news outlets. He also identifies new responsibilities that citizens must assume in the information age. Thereisanoccasional"gee-whiz" tone in much of Seib's descriptions of the (unquestionably exciting) possibilities of online news. And current events sometimes undercut him, as well: He declares, for instance, that exit polling has become so precise in presidential elections that 1948-like embarrassments (Dewey Defeats Truman!) are no longer much of a worry. An urgent and cogent (if somewhat breathless) reminder that journalistic ethics must attempt to keep pace with the explosive technological revolution.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742509016
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/28/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 0.53 (d)

Meet the Author

Philip Seib is a professor of Journalism and Public Diplomacy in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California. He is also a veteran television and newspaper journalist.
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 The World Is Watching Chapter 2 The Allure and Impact of Live Chapter 3 From Broadcast to Cable to Web Chapter 4 Newspapers’ New World Chapter 5 Adventures in Convergence Chapter 6 The Ethics Minefield Chapter 7 Sailing the Uncharted Sea
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