Going to Ground: Simple Life on a Georgia Pond

Going to Ground: Simple Life on a Georgia Pond

by Amy Blackmarr
     
 

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Unfulfilled by city life, Amy Blackmarr, then in her mid-thirties, sold her thriving paralegal business and returned to her Georgia roots. She passed five years in her grandfather's remote "old scarecrow of a fishing cabin" beside a South Georgia pond, where she immersed herself in her surroundings and in her writing. With warmth, charm, and humor, Blackmarr mixes

Overview

Unfulfilled by city life, Amy Blackmarr, then in her mid-thirties, sold her thriving paralegal business and returned to her Georgia roots. She passed five years in her grandfather's remote "old scarecrow of a fishing cabin" beside a South Georgia pond, where she immersed herself in her surroundings and in her writing. With warmth, charm, and humor, Blackmarr mixes vignettes from her past with reflections on the present, describing the surprising generosity of strangers; life without hot America. These stories trigger a kind of religious awakening in Ehrlich, who--as she moves tentatively toward reclaiming the heritage she rejected as a young woman--gains a new appreciation of life's possibilities, choices, and limitations.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Some five years ago at age 33, Blackmarr sold her paralegal business in Kansas and returned to Lax, Ga., where she moved into her late grandfather's fishing cabin next to a pond on the family farm. Except for occasional visits from friends, her beloved 93-year-old grandmother and a feisty neighbor, she spent the time by herself, learning to cope with snakes under the sink, mice behind the bookcase, an alligator in the pond and unfamiliar night sounds. In this elegant collection of essays, written during the years she spent in the tin-roofed, tar-papered shack, Blackmarr ruminates on her past and present life, observes the animals and plants around her and luxuriates in the solitude. The graceful pieces are imbued with a sense of calm and delight in naturethe light of a golden November sky, mist "gliding in like herons over the pond." They are also tinged with sadness, for Blackmarr knows that eventually her relatives will sell the property and she will be left with only memories of her rustic retreat. These essays are collected from Blackmarr's broadcasts of "Georgia Gazette" on the Peach State Public Radio Network. (Sept.)
Kirkus Reviews
This elliptical series of descriptive essays offers an experiment of sorts: a graceful descent into the Thoreauvian life of mind and nature.

In Walden, the prototypical "pond tale," Thoreau says he went to the woods so as not to discover, when he came to die, that he had not lived. Blackmarr decided several years ago to quit her Kansas business and move back home to southern Georgia and a fishing-cabin retreat, with two dogs for constant companions; and in a deliberate echo of Thoreau, she says she did not want to wake up regretting, 30 years later, that she had not done the things she'd always wanted to do—in particular, to write and to be near her grandmother, MaRe. Blackmarr's metaphor of discovery and of connectedness to her grandfather's land—her "ground"—is evoked throughout, but most literally in scenes that frame her story: first, her watching her "hard-bodied little gray dog" Max digging a cave in the dirt outside her cabin, and later, her dog Queenie's death and burial. Though not a traditional believer, she nevertheless does occasionally go looking "for God sign, like a good tracker." The author, who herself describes this work as "less narrative than scene, less word than image—less explanation than experience," is only selectively present in this memoir: as writer, hunter, arrowhead collector. That Blackmarr currently lives in a treehouse indicates she has not yet finished her quest.

But when she describes her cabin's view of light glittering on the water, "catching on the wet backs of turtles and in the feathery tops of the pale, tall grasses around the banks," and says "I am my grandmother's voice," readers are likely to hear this as a welcome invocation, and to fall effortlessly under the entrancing spell of her words.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670875672
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/01/1997
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
5.41(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.76(d)

What People are saying about this

Patricia Hampl
The life may be "simple" at Amy Blackmarr's South Georgia Pond, but her compelling voice is rich and nuanced...Each chapter rings with insight.

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