Going to Meet the Man

Going to Meet the Man

5.0 7
by James Baldwin
     
 

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"There's no way not to suffer. But you try all kinds of ways to keep from drowning in it." The men and women in these eight short fictions grasp this truth on an elemental level, and their stories, as told by James Baldwin, detail the ingenious and often desperate ways in which they try to keep their head above water. It may be the heroin that a

Overview

"There's no way not to suffer. But you try all kinds of ways to keep from drowning in it." The men and women in these eight short fictions grasp this truth on an elemental level, and their stories, as told by James Baldwin, detail the ingenious and often desperate ways in which they try to keep their head above water. It may be the heroin that a down-and-out jazz pianist uses to face the terror of pouring his life into an inanimate instrument. It may be the brittle piety of a father who can never forgive his son for his illegitimacy. Or it may be the screen of bigotry that a redneck deputy has raised to blunt the awful childhood memory of the day his parents took him to watch a black man being murdered by a gleeful mob.

By turns haunting, heartbreaking, and horrifying—and informed throughout by Baldwin's uncanny knowledge of the wounds racism has left in both its victims and its perpetrators—Going to Meet the Man is a major work by one of our most important writers.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
As might be expected for this collection of short stories, Dion Graham's reading requires him to master an array of voices: hellfire-preaching ministers, deliciously profane Harlem locals, to kittenish women. Graham ranges from tremulous exertion to sudden flashes of rage, his reading flecked by an exhaustion that creeps in at the margins of Baldwin's prose. Baldwin's protagonists are weary of a world that allows them no respite from racism and hatred, and Graham echoes that weariness, his voice hushed and low, its register reflecting their struggle to survive. (Mar.)
Library Journal
Available for the first time on audio, Baldwin's 1965 short story collection is timeless in its treatment of youthful innocence, prejudice, addiction, loneliness, fear, and human suffering. "Rockpile" and "The Outing" will seem familiar to those acquainted with his first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain; the third story, "Man Child," features a very chilling ending that will catch them off guard. The four subsequent tales—"Previous Condition," "Sonny's Blues," "This Morning, This Evening, So Soon," and "Come Out the Wilderness"—return listeners to a more familiar world with elements of frustration, anger, loneliness, and the desire for love. But the most resonant story by far is the final, titular one, which contains graphic descriptions of a lynching and is a catalyst for strong emotions. Actor/Audie Award winner Dion Graham (see Behind the Mike, LJ 11/1/09) is masterly in his rending of the vast array of characters in these eight disparate tales. Highly recommended for all audiences.—Valerie Piechocki, Prince George's Cty. Memorial Lib., Largo, MD

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780679761792
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/28/1995
Series:
Vintage International Series
Edition description:
Reissue
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
241,802
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author


James Baldwin (1924-1987) was educated in New York. He is the author of more than twenty works of fiction and nonfiction, including Go Tell It on the Mountain, Notes of a Native Son, Another Country, and Blues for Mister Charlie.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
August 2, 1924
Date of Death:
December 1, 1987
Place of Birth:
New York, New York
Place of Death:
St. Paul de Vence, France
Education:
DeWitt Clinton High School, New York City

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Going to Meet the Man 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
AK95 More than 1 year ago
I'll keep this short, Mr. Baldwin has crafted an American masterpeice that should be required reading for any English major. Six out of the eight stories are some of the finest samples of writing that you're ever going to come across. "Sonny's Blues" is poignant and authentic from the tragic start to the unforgettable ending. "Manchild" is simple and yet haunting. For anyone that considers themselves to be a fan of literature: read this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
christy_wooke More than 1 year ago
Amazing. Touching, yet brutal. These short stories explore the hurt and suffering we endure ourselves, and inflict onto fellow man. Intense.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I ACQUIRED THE BOOK IN 1988 THROUGH A SUCCESSION OF OWNERS WHO HAD NO IDEA WHAT A RARE JEWEL THEY HAD IN THEIR COLLECTION. INSIDE THE FRONT PAGE IS A DEDICATION. THE DEDICATION READS AS FOLLOWS : "TO DAD WITH LOVE AND GRATITUDE FOR A FOUNDATION OF FREE THINKING AND THE RIGHT TO DISAGREE EVEN WITH YOU." LOVE, MAEVA AND PETER DATED CHRISTMAS 1965. THERE ARE NO WORDS THAT CAN ACCURATELY CONVEY MY FEELINGS FOR THE COLLECTION OF STORIES! I WOULD URGE ANYONE THAT IS A TRUE BELIEVER AND LOVER OF TRUE LITERATURE TO READ THIS TITLE AS WELL AS THE REST OF BALDWIN'S WORK.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a collection of 8 well-written and gripping short stories that deal with love, hate, fear, prejudice and the suffering of the human condition. Some of the highlights include the stories 'Sonny's Blues', 'Previous Condition' and the chilling title story, 'Going to Meet the Man'. James Baldwin writes these stories with honesty and intensity. Be sure to read James Baldwin's other works too. He's really a very insightful and prolific writer.