Going to the Source, Volume 1: To 1877: The Bedford Reader in American History / Edition 3

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Overview

Many document readers offer lots of sources, but only Going to the Source combines a rich diversity of primary and secondary sources with in-depth instructions for how and when to use each type of source. Mirroring the chronology of the U.S. history survey, each of the main chapters employs a single type of source — from personal letters to political cartoons — while focusing on an intriguing historical episode such as the Cherokee Removal or the 1894 Pullman Strike. A new capstone chapter in each volume prompts students to synthesize information on a single topic from a variety of source types. The wide range of topics and sources across 28 chapters — 6 of them new — provide students with all they need to become fully engaged with America’s history.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312652784
  • Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
  • Publication date: 8/8/2011
  • Edition description: Third Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 340,899
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Victoria Bissell Brown is the L.F. Parker Professor of History at Grinnell College, where she teaches Modern U.S. History, U.S. Women’s History, and U.S. Immigration History. She is the author of The Education of Jane Addams and the editor of the Bedford/St. Martin’s edition of Jane Addams’s Twenty Years at Hull-House. Her articles have appeared in Feminist Studies, The Journal of Women’s History, and The Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society. She has served as a Book Review Editor for The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era and for the Women and Social Movements website.
 
Timothy J. Shannon is professor of History at Gettysburg College, where he teaches Early American and Native American History. His other books include Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier, Atlantic Lives: A Comparative Approach to Early America, and Indians and Colonists at the Crossroads of Empire: The Albany Congress of 1754, which received the Dixon Ryan Fox Prize from the New York State Historical Association and the Distinguished Book Award from the Society of Colonial Wars. His articles have appeared in the William and Mary Quarterly, Ethnohistory, and the New England Quarterly, and he has been a research fellow at the Huntington Library and John Carter Brown Library.

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Table of Contents


*new to this edition

Inside Front Cover: Guide to Using the Book


1. Monsters and Marvels: Images of Animals from the New World

Using the Source: Images of Animals 

     What Can Images of Animals Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Images

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: Images of Animals from the New World

Analyzing Images of Animals

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

2. Tales of Captivity and Redemption: North American Captivity Narratives

Using the Source: Captivity Narratives

     What Can Captivity Narratives Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Captivity Narratives

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: North American Captivity Narratives

Analyzing Captivity Narratives

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

 

3. Colonial America's Most Wanted: Runaway Advertisements in Colonial Newspapers

Using the Source: Runaway Advertisements

     What Can Runaway Advertisements Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Print Advertisements

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: Runaway Advertisements in Colonial Newspapers, 1747-1770

Analyzing Runaway Advertisements

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

4. Germ Warfare on the Colonial Frontier: An Article from the Journal of American History

Using the Source: Journal Articles

     What Can Journal Articles Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Journal Articles

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: An Article from the Journal of American History, March 2000

Analyzing Journal Articles

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

5. Toasting Rebellion: Toasts and Songs in Revolutionary America

Using the Source: Toasts and Songs

     What Can Toasts and Songs Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Songs and Toasts

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: Toasts and Songs of the Patriot Movement, 1765-1788

Analyzing Toasts and Songs

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

6. Debating the Constitution: Speeches from the New York Ratification Convention

Using the Source: The Ratification Debates

     What Can the Ratification Debates Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Political Debates

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: Speeches Debating the Constitution from the New York Ratification Convention, June 21-28, 1788

Analyzing the Ratification Debates

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

7. The Question of Female Citizenship: Court Records from the New Nation

Using the Source: Court Records

     What Can Court Records Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Court Records

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: James Martin (Plaintiff in Error) v. The Commonwealth and William Bosson and Other Ter-tenants, 1805

Analyzing Court Records

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

8. Family Values: Advice Literature for Parents and Children in the Early Republic

Using the Source: Advice Literature for Parents and Children

     What Can Advice Literature Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Advice Literature

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: Advice Literature on Child Rearing and Children's Literature, 1807-1833

Analyzing Advice Literature

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

*9. The Meaning of Cherokee Civilization: Newspaper Editorials about Indian Removal 

Using the Source: Newspaper Editorials

     What Can Newspaper Editorials Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Newspaper Editorials

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: Newspaper Editorials about Indian Removal

Analyzing Newspaper Editorials about Indian Removal

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

*10. Challenging the "Peculiar Institution": Slave Narratives from the Antebellum South 

Using the Source: Slave Narratives

     What Can Slave Narratives Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Slave Narratives

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: Antebellum Slave Narratives

Analyzing Slave Narratives

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

11. Martyr or Madman? Biographies of John Brown

Using the Source: Biographies of John Brown

     What Can Biographies Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Biographies

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: Biographies of John Brown

Analyzing Biographies

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

12. The Illustrated Civil War: Photography on the Battlefield

Using the Source: Civil War Photographs

     What Can Civil War Photographs Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Photographs

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: Photographs of Civil War Battlefields and Military Life, 1861-1866

Analyzing Civil War Photographs

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

13. Political Terrorism during Reconstruction: Congressional Hearings and Reports on the Ku Klux Klan

Using the Source: Congressional Hearings and Reports

     What Can Congressional Hearings and Reports Tell Us?

     CHECKLIST: Interrogating Congressional Hearings and Reports

     Source Analysis Table

The Source: Testimony and Reports from the Joint Select Committee to Inquire into the Condition of Affairs in the Late Insurrectionary States

Analyzing Congressional Hearings and Reports

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

*CAPSTONE: Coming Together and Pulling Apart: Nineteenth-Century Fourth of July Observations 

Using Multiple Source Types on Fourth of July Observations

     What Can Multiple Source Types Tell Us?

     Source Analysis Table

The Sources: Documents and Images Portraying Fourth of July Observations, 1819-1903

Analyzing Sources on Fourth of July Observations

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

Appendix I: Avoiding Plagiarism: Acknowledging the Source

Appendix II: Documenting the Source

 

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