Going Vintage [NOOK Book]

Overview

When Mallory discovers that her boyfriend, Jeremy, is cheating on her with an online girlfriend, she swears off boys. She also swears off modern technology. Inspired by a list of goals her grandmother made in 1962, Mallory decides to "go vintage" and return to a simpler time (when boyfriends couldn't cheat on you online). She sets out to complete grandma's list: run for pep club secretary, host a dinner party, sew a homecoming dress, find a steady, do something dangerous. But the list is trickier than it looks. ...
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Going Vintage

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Overview

When Mallory discovers that her boyfriend, Jeremy, is cheating on her with an online girlfriend, she swears off boys. She also swears off modern technology. Inspired by a list of goals her grandmother made in 1962, Mallory decides to "go vintage" and return to a simpler time (when boyfriends couldn't cheat on you online). She sets out to complete grandma's list: run for pep club secretary, host a dinner party, sew a homecoming dress, find a steady, do something dangerous. But the list is trickier than it looks. And obviously finding a steady is out . . . no matter how good Oliver (Jeremy's cousin) smells. But with the help of her sister, she'll get it done. Somehow.

Lindsey Leavitt perfectly pairs heartfelt family moments, laugh-out-loud humor, and a little bit of romance in this delightful contemporary novel.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A devoted list maker, 16-year-old Mallory is determined to transform her life when she finds out her boyfriend, Jeremy, has a cybergirlfriend who goes by the name “BubbleYum.” As Mallory’s relationship and reputation fall apart publicly on “Friendspace,” she declares she’s “Done with computers and phones... and fake fakeness. I’m talking complete isolation.” She swears off technology to focus on a list her grandmother made in 1962 when she was 16; Mallory vows to run for pep squad secretary, host a fancy dinner, sew a homecoming dress, find a “steady,” and do something dangerous. Mallory’s high-spirited and hilarious younger sister, Ginnie, supports her, as does her ex’s cute, offbeat cousin Oliver, and sparks fly as they build a pep club homecoming float. In the meantime, Mallory’s grandmother, who has just moved into a senior residence, seems distracted and uninterested in revisiting the past—and she may have her reasons. With perceptiveness and several fun plot twists, Leavitt’s (Sean Griswold’s Head) nuanced book is filled with quirky characters that readers will root for and believe in. Ages 12–up. Agent: Sarah Davies, Greenhouse Literary Agency. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Lisa Colozza Cocca
When high school junior Mallory catches her boyfriend, Jeremy, engaging in a cyber-relationship with another girl, she responds in anger on the Internet. When the response from friends and strangers alike becomes overwhelming to her, she swears off technology. Mallory, who loves lists, finds a list of personal goals written by her grandmother when she was Mallory's age. Mallory, who mistakenly thinks everything was easy and simple when her grandmother was a teen, decides to "go vintage" and live the way people did in the early sixties. Luckily, she also finds the clothes her grandmother has saved for fifty years and they happen to fit Mallory. Dressed in the vintage clothes, Mallory trades in her cell phone and laptop for an old rotary phone and plans to forget about Jeremy by completing the goals on her grandmother's list. With help from her younger and seemingly wiser sister, Ginny, her grandmother, and Oliver, a senior boy who happens to be Jeremy's cousin, Mallory achieves many of the goals. Witty and fast-paced, the novel is told through the viewpoint of the spunky, if somewhat dramatic, main character. It is a contemporary romance that will have readers laughing and considering giving up their techno-gadgets. Reviewer: Lisa Colozza Cocca
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up—While the premise of Going Vintage appears to be the usual run-of-the-mill romantic fodder-girl is wildly in love with her boyfriend, boy cheats on girl, girl seeks to find herself-it becomes evident from the opening chapter that Leavitt is exploring new romantic territory here. When Mallory discovers that Jeremy has been cheating on her with "Bubbleyum," a girl he is "married" to in a virtual simulation game, she declares him to be a "tool" and swears off all 21st-century technology. She finds a list her grandmother made during her junior year of high school, in 1962, to guide a personal journey of self-discovery. How hard could it be to sew a homecoming dress, "find a steady," and become Pep Club secretary? Since Mallory can't sew, recently dumped her boyfriend, and doesn't even know what a Pep Club is, she ropes her sister and grandmother into helping her complete the list. Filled with humor and style, this title will capture teens' attention from the first page to the last. The characters are relatable, as are Mallory's situations. It's refreshing that the protagonist's resolve not to let Jeremy back into her life does not waiver and that she doesn't jump into another relationship to get over the old one. A quick, enjoyable read and an enchanting addition to the chick-lit genre.—Tammy Turner, Centennial High School, Frisco, TX
Kirkus Reviews
After discovering her boyfriend has a serious online relationship with another girl, Mallory very publicly dumps him on his social media site. She complicates the situation by deciding to try to fulfill a to-do list her grandmother crafted at the beginning of her junior year of high school in 1962, a time Mallory thinks must have been much simpler than today. That means giving up the 21st-century technology she's accustomed to relying on--going vintage--and also becoming secretary of the pep club (that doesn't exist), sewing a dress for homecoming (she doesn't sew) and finding a steady boyfriend, among other challenges. She's aided by her loyal younger sister, Ginnie, and the growing affection of her ex's cousin, charming Oliver. Adding another level of concern to Mallory's bumpy ride is Ginnie's conviction that their shallow though earnest mother is having an affair and her misguided efforts to fix their parents' marriage. Mallory's appealing, sarcasm-tinged first-person narrative voice sculpts a likable teen mildly reminiscent of Louise Rennison's Georgia Nicolson. Although a far-too-convenient event proves Mallory was wrong about her grandmother's simpler life, that fails to derail an otherwise admirable look at the advantages, and the downsides, of modern technology--and serious relationships. A funny and even thoughtful look at boyfriends, high school angst and the importance of finding oneself. (Fiction. 11-16)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781599909844
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 3/26/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 366,688
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Lindsey Leavitt
LINDSEY LEAVITT is a former elementary school teacher. She married her high-school lab partner and now lives in Nevada with her husband and three little girls. She is also the author of Princess for Hire. lindseyleavitt.com
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 28 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 30, 2013

    Going Vintage is a sweet, heartfelt story that will leave reader

    Going Vintage is a sweet, heartfelt story that will leave readers wanting more of Mallory and her lists. 

    Mallory’s life is great. She’s got a great boyfriend and never feels alone. Until she opens Jeremy’s computer to discover that she’s not the only girl in his life. Heartbroken, Mallory swears off technology and pines for the simpler times of 1962 when her grandmother was a teen. 
    Leavitt created a smart and witty character in Mallory. Her voice is refreshing. Unlike some characters, Mallory’s eclectic taste in clothes and even sports bobbleheads give the character more depth than I expected. I really enjoyed her quirks.

    I also applaud Leavitt for the family dynamic. Mallory’s parents are happily married, and her little sister comes across wise beyond her years. It’s nice to see a novel explore the family in such a way that makes you want to become a part of this group of unique and fun people. 
    The plot flows nicely, and the novel is a quick, entertaining read.

    Recommendation: Fans of Sarah Dessen and Miranda Kenneally should definitely add this to their must-read list. 

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 26, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Mallory is completely smitten with her boyfriend Jeremy, but whe

    Mallory is completely smitten with her boyfriend Jeremy, but when she discovers he’s been having a long-distance, virtual love affair with some skank-ho with the screen name BubbleYum, she breaks up with him and humiliates him on Friendspace. A few days later, while cleaning out her grandmother’s house, Mallory discovers a list of things her grandmother hoped to accomplish her Junior year of high school. This makes Mallory wonder what it would have been like to live in the 60′s, where things like being Pep Club secretary, making your own dress for homecoming and hosting a fancy dinner party are at the top of your “to-do” list. Mallory decides to find out. She’ll give up all technology (since it was at the root of her heartache anyway), dress in vintage clothing and try and accomplish everything on her grandmother’s list before homecoming. It seems easy enough, but Mallory didn’t plan on Jeremy being so clingy…. or hitting it off with Jeremy’s cousin, Oliver. Is she strong enough to stick to her laurels, or will these boys throw her off course?

    Mallory was a cute and determined character. She seemed fairly average — not overly popular, but not a loner either. Her best friend is her younger sister, Ginnie, and while she has friends at school, there’s no one she’s especially close to. This is mainly because she’s been making out with Jeremy non-stop for the last year and hasn’t had time for friends.

    Ginnie was cute and spunky and a lot more direct and outgoing than Mallory. She plays soccer and is good at pretty much everything she tries.

    The two boys, Jeremy and his cousin Oliver, both serve their purpose to the story, but neither were particularly memorable.

    The writing perfectly suits the story. Mallory is obsessed with making lists, and the book is peppered with them. Several of them made me laugh. The book is told from Mallory’s POV, and the voice was pitch-perfect. The story was light and cute, and the pace fit the book.

    All in all, this was a cute book (in case I haven’t used that word enough). There was nothing wrong with it;  it just wasn’t for me. It’s light and fluffy, but for me, not overly engaging. I liked the idea of “going vintage”. I don’t think I could do it, even though I did manage to live  without cell phones, home PC’s and video games when I was in grade school.

    Don’t get me wrong. This isn’t a bad book, it just wasn’t my cup of tea. It will definitely appeal to those who like their contemporary reads light, their characters spunky and their romance innocent.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 28, 2013

    I have had my eye on this book for a while. It was so cute!! I l

    I have had my eye on this book for a while. It was so cute!! I loved the creative storyline. Getting rid of all technology in todays world? That would be nearly impossible, and we saw how hard it was in the book. It was a really cute idea though, and I loved being able to watch it. 
    Oliver was the sweetest. I am obsessed with him. He joked with her when she needed it, and was sweet and a good listener when she needed it. He was so unexpected to Mallory, but turned out to be just what she needed. 
    I loved Mallory's sister and grandma. They really helped keep the story interesting as it went along. There was a lot of family drama going on. It was cool to see how well it was mixed in with everything else. 
    The ending. I have read quite a few reviews where people have said that they don't think the book provided closure. I however have to disagree. I don't want to give anything away, but I think the way the book ended was perfect. It manages to still be sweet and hopeful, but strong and capable. While at the same time, it is just open ended enough for a possible sequel??? I know I would definitely read this series if she wrote more! 

    I received this book for free in return for an honest review. 

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2013

    Going Vintage was a delightful read full of characters I wanted

    Going Vintage was a delightful read full of characters I wanted to be friends with, except maybe Jeremy.  Mallory was a quirky,often humorous character that gives up technology to go back to a time when things had to have been better, 1962 to be exact.  She discovers a list of goals her grandmother wrote and decides to make them her own.  On this journey, she discovers that life isn't always what it seems, learns a few things about herself and meets a boy who might be just close to perfect..  I loved her sister Ginnie and how close  they were and her relationship with her parents. Once I got into it, I couldn't put it down.  A refreshing contemporary with great characters, clean language and sweet romance that doesn't define the whole story.  It is so much more than that.  Loved it !

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2014

    Amazing

    This book is great if you have ever heard the song "Automatic" by Carrie Underwood, that is like the story of the book. Like they need to make a movie out of this book it is so amazing!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 6, 2014

    Oh my friggin¿ word. This is exactly the YA novel I¿ve been wait

    Oh my friggin’ word. This is exactly the YA novel I’ve been waiting for. No, it’s what I’ve subtly, by means of critical and somewhat snarky reviews, been begging for. Yes, my dear bookworm friends, it has finally arrived. Allow me the opportunity to relish this moment. Deep breath. Okay, I’m probably going to say it more than once, but here goes: this novel here – Going Vintage, written by the exceptionally talented Lindsey Leavitt, is glorious YA perfection! I feel kinda giddy saying it, but it is the plain and simple truth. This book was amazing. It has everything!

    Before I break into song and dance, allow me two minutes to just give it to you straight without any frills, bells or whistles. THIS is what you should read next, no matter whether you’re a tween, teen, young adult, new adult, middle-aged bored housewife or smack bang in the middle of your golden years. You’ll love this book because you should and because if you don’t, you are soulless. There, I said it. It has characters that are so spectacularly real and authentic it breaks my heart that they’re only fictional. It has a story with a heartbeat that just wrenches all the feels out of you. But the real deal breaker for me – like it is with every rom com I read - is that it is insanely, ridiculously funny! I can’t sum it up any better than that, but still I’ll try.

    I loved, adored, worshipped practically every character in this book. Mallory has one of the strongest female voices I’ve ever come across in YA romance and I felt an almost instant connection to her. She is hilarious, realistic, curious, intelligent, insightful, decisive, and emotionally strong. She’s not popular, but neither is she unpopular, and she doesn’t even try to fit in because that would mean not being her true self. I was in awe of how she dealt with her boyfriend’s betrayal and their eventual break-up. Going Vintage is not only a story about surviving betrayal and the end of a relationship, but it’s also about getting over it and moving on by whichever means necessary. It’s a romance without all the mush and without the constant and never-ending make-out and swoon sessions so prevalent in most teen novels. Even though very little descriptions are offered as to the characters’ physical appearances, I had no trouble sketching them in my mind’s eye as they came alive on each and every page of this magnificently riveting book. The most redeemable quality of Going Vintage for me is the absolutely no frills, no fuss, unpredictable and surprising ending which made me bump my fist in the air and proudly shout a triumphant, “oh yeah”!

    I just have to say it again: this work of art had everything in it that I’ve been begging to see in a flipping phenomenal YA novel. It has pizzazz and all around goodness and rainbows and butterflies. I even liked the cheating boyfriend because the author didn’t make him into an arrogant bad-ass, but just a confused boy (who also confused the heck out of me because I wanted to dislike him, but alas…). And no hot blooded female reading this book will be able to resist Oliver’s charm. I’ll bet my last Orea cookie on that. Plus, Mallory’s grandmother is a riot and a sweetheart all in one; not forgetting Mallory’s wise-for-her-age little sister whose larger than life personality cannot be ignored, and Mallory’s awkward, but quirky parents, and the close relationship Mallory has with all these people. Even her weird friends found a spot in my heart.

    Going Vintage is a book I’ll read again and again just to make sure I didn’t miss a thing the first time around. It has a fantastic story that would make older readers (much older readers) reminisce about being a teen in the sixties, and it would have younger readers heaving a sigh of relief that they live in the era they do. Imagine a life – even just two weeks - without cyber social networking platforms, no cell phones, no internet, no GPS and no microwaves. Well, let me not say anymore as I’m on the verge of including spoilers because I have so much more I want to say. My point is, folks, I want you to read this book. But if you still think this is not for you, then at least get it for your daughter or granddaughter. Fans of books by Meg Cabot, Eileen Cook and Claire LaZebnik will get a kick out of Going Vintage. I, for one, can’t wait for this author’s next book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 28, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Best Bits: I absolutely loved the premise of this one. I have ce

    Best Bits: I absolutely loved the premise of this one. I have certainly had my moments where I'd like to throw my phone away and swear off the internet. Sadly, unlike Mallory, I'm not brave enough to go through with it. This technological ban occurs after she discovers her boyfriend has an online girlfriend in a role-playing game, and declares that she's had it with all the calls/texts/internet drama that comes afterwards. Another favorite: Oliver (Mallory's ex-boyfriend's cousin). He's old-school dreamy. He sings her songs, calls her on the landline, and says criminy. What isn't to love? Ginnie, Mallory's sister, is awesome, too. She has her own things going on in her life, but it's great when she ensures that Mallory sticks to her vintage life by removing certain contraband items from her room.

    Nit Picks: The hardest thing for me was getting involved in all the various side-stories. Things are happening with her grandmother, who inspired the vintage lifestyle, and her parents are arguing. Not to mention continued drama with Jeremy at school, a budding romance with Oliver, and completing the list she's created to have an excellent Junior year. It made it a little hard to invest in each story. I wanted to learn more about what was going on with her grandmother, cared less about her parents. I probably shouldn't admit this, but I didn't like Mallory's mother at all. Even after she was redeemed at the end of the book, I had no sympathy for her.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2013

    Write more books Lindsey

    I seriously hope your working on something your a great author i reccomend it to anyone and everyone

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    Best Book Ever!

    I love this book so much, it's hilarous, sweet and suprisingly had the best fictional family I've ever seen. Great book, couldn't put it down!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 19, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Going Vintage by Lindsey Leavitt is a story almost everyone livi

    Going Vintage by Lindsey Leavitt is a story almost everyone living in this age of technology can relate to. It tells the story of Mallory, a girl who just found out her boyfriend has been having a secret relationship with a girl over an Internet game. But when she dumps him for being a virtual cheater she's the one who is publicly bashed on the Internet, causing her to swear off technology. It's a look at what it really means to disconnect from society. Is going vintage Mallory's way of disconnecting, or was she, even with her cell phone, email, and social networks, already disconnected from society?




    One of my favorite things about Going Vintage is the emphasis on family that you don't usually see in YA novels. A YA heroine's family is usually absentee, annoyingly infringing to the point of avoidance, or mentioned a few times in passing but never really introduced. Not the case for Mallory's family. Her little sister Ginnie is her best friend and her partner in her sixties shenanigans. Her parents, as much as she wants to avoid them at times, are still always present and their relationship plays a big role in the novel. Then there's Mallory's grandmother, the whole inspiration for her going vintage in the first place. The family bonds forged and fights had are right at the center of this novel and it's actually a lot of fun to read about.




    The romance in Going Vintage is one of those slow growing, ever changing kinds. It starts out as merely a friendship between Mallory and her ex's cousin, Oliver, but it's no surprise when things start to get more serious for these two. It's not an "Oh my God, he's so hot" or "She's so beautiful I can't take my eyes off of her" type romance. It's more like a meeting of two kindred souls who could become more to each other in the future. It was sweet and beautiful and refreshing to read.




    I really love the way every chapter starts with one of Mallory's lists. They were entertaining to read and usually very telling of what was coming up in a chapter. They left me wanting to come up with a list or two of my own.




    Going Vintage is a lighthearted, yet still poignant novel that takes a look at the ways technology has changed our society, and the ways it hasn't. Lovers of contemporary will fall in love with Mallory's quirky style and Leavitt's quirky sense of humor.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2013

    AMAZING

    AMAZING

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2015

    Amazing

    So good. I love oliver

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  • Posted January 19, 2015

    My Thoughts: I am the type of person who grew up loving "v

    My Thoughts:

    I am the type of person who grew up loving "vintage" things, only I didn't view them as vintage. Listening to records? Absolutely normal in my house. In fact, I have a record player and about 30 or so records of my own now. So the idea of this story--living simply--was one I liked immediately.

    Mallory amused me so much with her commentary and the things she said to people. I find that it's hard to come across protagonists that are truly funny. Some can be "funny" except it's more of an annoying or forced kind of funny. With Mallory, she was just freaking FUNNY. And it was the little things too. One thing in the beginning when she was still dating Jeremy: she would make excuses to NOT kiss him. It was that whole situation that got me invested in the story.

    When Mallory starts working on the list, it isn't as "simple" as expected. The times have changed, obviously, so trying to not go online or use a cell phone makes interacting with people difficult, especially when they have no idea what you're doing. Her sister, Ginnie, is extremely helpful and frustrating at the same time when it comes to Mallory's quest. And then there's Oliver--dear, sweet Oliver--who is there for her despite her fears of the possibility of being with Jeremy's cousin.

    Going Vintage was a very adorable story. All the characters melded well together, everyone in the family and at school. The romantic aspect between Mallory and Oliver was only a little snippet of the story but the build up and tension made it worthwhile. In the end, Lindsey Leavitt didn't just wrap it up in a bow, it had a realistic ending. It is definitely worth reading.

    My Rating: Very Good

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  • Posted November 9, 2014

    :) \

    :)
    \

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2014

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  • Posted September 19, 2014

    good book

    good book

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  • Posted July 16, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Fun, Quirky, and Quick Read

    Seriously, where has this book been my whole life and why haven’t I read it sooner? I’ve read other books by Lindsey Leavitt, but this book was just what I was looking for. Funny, sweet and heartwarming, Going Vintage shows that its hard to be a teen, no matter what era.

    The premise of this book is simple, but makes for a cute read. After Mallory discovers that her boyfriend has been cybercheating on her, Mallory decides it is time for a change. When Mallory discovers a list of goals her grandmother had in 1962, Mallory decides it is time to demodernize. Going vintage for Mallory has its ups and downs, and along the way Mallory learns a lot about herself and those around her.

    I loved how much Mallory grew throughout the course of the entire novel. In the beginning, Mallory was soley focused on her boyfriend. When she breaks up with him, she does not really know who she is or what to do. While deciding to try to live its the 1960s seems a bit drastic, for Mallory, it fits. She’s a bit different, marching to the beat of her own drum, and sticking to something she believes in. She was sarcastic and funny and I loved her voice. Mallory is obsessed with keeping lists, part of the reason why she becomes fascinated with her grandmother’s own list, and I loved that each chapter would begin with one of her lists.

    The secondary characters really helped to complement Mallory and round out the story. I loved Mallory’s entire family. Her dad and her mom had their own little side story that ended up working nicely into the plot. I loved that her dad’s job was sort of “Storage Wars”-esque, while Mallory’s mom was busy running, and hiding, savings blog. I really liked her parents and their story. Mallory’s sister Ginnie was so cute. She was very different from Mallory, but the pair complemented each other well. Their relationship was spot on. Mallory’s Grandma was the character who surprised me the most. Her list from junior year of high school is what drives Mallory and I loved learning about the women behind it. She’s not exactly what you would expect, and she proves that high school back in the 60s was just as difficult as it is today.

    The romance in the book was very cute. Oliver Kendall, who just happens to be Mallory’s ex-boyfriend’s cousin, proves to be a good match for Mallory. The scenes between the two of them were so fun to read; I couldn’t help from grinning. While they have their misunderstandings, their relationships works really well. Going Vintage isn’t primarily a rom-com book, but the romance fits in well with the plot.

    Despite the fact that giving up all modern technology to accomplish outdated goals (what is pep club anyways?) is a bit of an outlandish idea, Lindsey Leavitt makes the book work. The book could have easily been very cheesy and full of fluff, but Leavitt manages to expertly weave a tale that tackles the difficulties of being a teenager and finding yourself. This book was heartfelt and showed that high school is never perfect; every teenager, no matter what decade, faces their own unique challenges.

    This is my second book by Lindsey Leavitt that I’ve read, but I will definitely be checking out any of her other books. She has an incredible talent of telling entertaining stories, that also deal with real issues facing teens. Going Vintage is a cute and fun read that delivers a heartfelt story about the difficulties of being a teenager. If you are looking for a quick and enjoyable read this summer,

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    Fast.Witty.Refreshing.LOVED IT!

    Mallory's social life is about to take an unexpected turn when she first, finds out her boyfriend is cyber-cheating on her, swears off technology, then tries to accomplish ever goal on an out-of-date checklist. The checklist includes things like joining a pep-squad, finding a boyfriend, and sewing her own homecoming dress! Amidst all of this Mallory tries to sort out her feeling for her ex and her ex's all-too-charming cousin who just so happens to be president of the pep-squad!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2013

    Spelling nazi

    I hate how people just put amazing and dont tell why its amazing and dont get me going on people who do not check spelling or grammar i just cant stand it

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2013

    great plot

    It had a great plot but i thought mallory was being stuborn in the middle. I mean jeremy explained and tried really har to make things right but she just listened to what she thought.

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